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pg 256OCTOBER

1. Early to my Lord to White-hall; and there he did give me some work to do for him and so with all haste to the office.

Dined at home, and my father by chance with me. After dinner he and I advised about hangings for my rooms, which are now almost fit to be hung,1 the painters beginning to do their work today.2

After dinner he and I to the Miter, where with my uncle Wight (whom my father fetched thither), while I drank a glass of wine privately with Mr. Mansell (a poor Reformado of the Charles) who came to see me.

Here we stayed and drank three or four pints of wine and so parted.

I home to look after my workmen; and at night to bed.

The Comissioners are very busy disbanding of the army, which they say doth cause great robbing.3 My layings out upon my house in Furniture are so great that I fear I shall not be able to go through them without breaking one of my bags of 100l, I having but 200l yet in the world.

2. With Sir W. Pen by water to White-hall – being this morning visited before I went out by my brother Tom, who told me that for his lying out-of-doors a day and a night my father hath forbid him to come any more into his house – at which I was troubled and did soundly chide him for doing so; and upon confessing his fault, I told him I would speak to my father.

pg 257At White-hall I met with Captain Clerke and took him to the Legg in King-streete and did give him a dish or two of meat, and his purser that was with him, for his old kindness to me on board.1 After dinner I to Westminster-hall, where I met with Mrs. Hunt and was forced to wait upon Mr. Scawen at a committee to speak for her Husband, which I did.2 After that met with Luellin and Mr. Fage and took them both to the Dogg and did give them a glass of wine. After that at Wills I met with Mr. Spicer; and with him to the abby to see them at vespers there, where I find but a thin congregacion allready. So that I see religion, be it what it will, is but a humour, and so the esteem of it passeth as other things do. From thence with him to see Robin Shaw, who hath been a long time ill and I have not seen him since I came from Sea. He is much changed, but in hopes to be well again. From thence by Coach to my father's and discoursed with him about Tom and did give my advice to take him home again, which I think he will do in prudence rather then put him upon learning the way of being worse.

So home; and from home to Major Hart, who is just going out of towne tomorrow and made much of me and did give me the oaths of Supremacy and allegiance – that I may be capable of my arreares.3

So home again, where my wife tells me what she hath bought today; viz, a bed and furniture for her chamber, with which, very well pleased, I went to bed.

3. With Sir W. Batten and Pen by water to White-hall, where a meeting of the Dukes of Yorke and Albermarle, my Lord Sandwich and all the Principal Officers, about the Winter gard; but we determined of nothing.

From thence to my Lord's, who sent a great iron chest to White-hall; and I saw it carried into the King's closet, where I saw most incomparable pictures. Among the rest, a book open pg 258upon a deske which I durst have sworn was a reall book, &c.1

Back again to my Lord and dined all alone with him, who doth treat me with a great deal of respect. And after dinner did discourse an houre with me and advise about getting of some way to get himself some money to make up for all his great expenses – saying that he believed he might have anything that he would ask of the King.

This day Mr. Sheply and all my Lord's good[s] came from sea – some of them laid at the Wardrobe and some brought to my Lord's house.

From thence to our office, where we met and did business: and so home and spent the evening looking upon the painters that are at work in my house.

This day I heard the Duke speak of a great design that he and my Lord of Pembrooke have, and a great many others, of sending a venture to some parts of affrica to dig for gold=ore there. They entend to admit as many as will venture their money, and so make themselfs a company. 250l is the lowest share for every man. But I do not find that my Lord doth much like it.2

At night Dr Fairebrother (for so he is lately made of the Civil law) brought home my wife by Coach, it being rainy weather, she having been abroad today to buy more furniture for her house.

4. Thursday. This morning I was busy looking over papers at the office all alone. And being visited by Lieutenant Lambert of the Charles (to whom I was formerly much beholden to),3 pg 259I took him along with me to a little alehouse hard by our office, whither my Cozen Tho. Pepys the Turner had sent for me to show me two Gentlemen that had a great desire to be known to me, the one his name is Pepys, of our family, but one that I never heard of before, and the other a younger son of Sir Tho. Bendishes,1 and so we all called Cosins.

After sitting awhile and drink[ing], my two new Cosins, myself and Lieutenant Lambert went by water to White-hall; and from thence I and Lieutenant Lambert to Westminster Abbey, where we saw Dr Fruen2 translated to the Archbishopric of Yorke.

Here I saw the Bishops of Winchester, Bangor, Rochester, Bath and Wells, and Salisbury,3 all in their habitts, in King Henry the 7ths chappell. But Lord, at their going out, how people did most of them look upon them as strange Creatures, and few with any kind of love or Respect.

From thence we two to my Lord's, where we took Mr. Sheply and W. Howe to the Rayne Deare and had some oysters, which were very good, the first I have eat this year. So back to my Lord's to dinner; and after dinner Lieutenant Lambert and I did look upon my Lord's Modell,4 and he told me many things in a ship that I desired to understand.

From thence by water, I (landing Lieutenant Lambert at Black-friars) went home and there by promise met with Rob. Shaw and Jack Spicer, who came to see me; and by the way I met upon Tower hill with Mr. Pierce the surgeon and his wife and took them home and did give them good wine, ale, and anchoves. And stayed them till night, and so adieu.

Then to look upon my paynters that are now at work in my house. At night to bed.

pg 2605. Office day. Dined at home; and all the afternoon at home to see my paynters make an end of their work, which they did today to my content; and I am in great joy to see my house likely once again to be cleane. At night to bed.

6. All this morning Collonell Slingsby and I at the office getting a Catch ready for the Prince de Ligne to carry his things away today, who is now going home again.1

About noon comes my Cosen H. Alcock, for whom I wrote a letter for my Lord to sign to my Lord Broghill for some preferment in Ireland, whither he is is now a-going.

After him comes Mr. Creed, who brought me some books from Holland with him, well bound2 and good books, which I thought he did entend to give me, but I find that I must pay him.

He dined with me at my house; and from thence to White-hall together, where I was to give my Lord an account of the Stacions and Victualls of the fleet in order to the choosing of a fleet fit for him to take to sea to bring over the Queene.3

But my Lord not coming in before 9 at night, I stayed no longer for him, but went back again home and so to bed.

7. Lordsday. To White-hall on foot, calling at my father's to change my long black Cloake for a short one (long cloaks being now quite out); but he being gone to church, I could not get one, and therefore I proceeded on and came to my Lord before he went to Chappell; and so went with him, where I heard Dr. Spurstow4 preach before the King a poor dry sermon; but a very good Anthemne of Captain Cookes afterwards.

Going out of the Chappell, I met with Jack Cole my old friend (whom I had not seen a great while before), and have promised to renew acquaintance in London together. To my Lord's and dined with him; he all dinner time talking French to me and telling me the story how the Duke of Yorke hath got my Lord Chancellors daughter with child, and that she doth lay it to him, pg 261and that for certain he did promise her marriage and had signed it with his blood, but that he by stealth had got the paper out of her Cabinett. And that the King would have him to marry her, but that he will not.1 So that the thing is very bad for the Duke and them all; but my Lord doth make light of it, as a thing that he believes is not a new thing to the Duke to do abroad.a Discoursing concerning what if the Duke should marry her, my Lord told me that among his father's many old sayings that he had writ in a book of his,2 this is one: that he that doth get a wench with child and marries her afterward it is as if a man should shit in his hat and then clap it upon his head.

I perceive my Lord is grown a man very indifferent in all matters of Religion, and so makes nothing of these things.

After dinner to the Abby, where I heard them read the church-service, but very Ridiculously, that endeed I do not in my mind like it at all. A poor cold sermon of Dr. Lambs, one of the Prebends, in his habitt, came afterwards; and so all ended. And by my troth a pitiful sorry devocion it is that these men pay.

So walked home by land. And before supper I read part of the Maryan persecution in Mr. Fuller.3 So to supper, prayer, and to bed.

8. office day. And my wife being gone out to buy some household stuff, I dined all alone. And after dinner to Westminster, in my way meeting Mr. Moore coming to me, who went back again with me, calling in several places about business: at my father's about gilded leather for my dining room, at Mr. Crews about money, at my Lord's about the same; but meeting not Mr. Sheply there, I went home by water and Mr. Moore with me, who stayed and supped with me till almost 9 at night. We love one another's discourse, so that we cannot part when we do meet.

pg 262He tells me that the profit of the Privy Seale is much fallen – for which I am very sorry. He gone, and I to bed.

9. This morning, Sir W. Batten with Collonell Birch to Deptford to pay off two ships.1 Sir W. Pen and I stayed to do business, and afterward together to White-hall, where I went to my Lord and found him in bed not well. And saw in his chamber his picture,2 very well done; and am with childa till I get it copyed out, which I hope to do when he is gone to sea.

To White-hall again, where at Mr. Coventrys chamber I met with Sir W. Pen again, and so with him to Redriffe by water and from thence walked over the fields to Deptford (the first pleasant walk I have had a great while); and in our way had a great deal of merry discourse, and find him to be a merry fellow and pretty good-natured and sings very bawdy songs.

So we came and find our Gentlemen and Mr. Prin at the pay.

About noon we dined together and were very merry at table, telling of tales.

After dinner to the pay of another ship3 till 10 at night. And so home in our barge, a clear Moone-shine night and it was 12 a-clock before we got home – where I find my wife in bed and part of our chambers hung today by the Upholster; but not being well done, I was fretted, and so in a discontent to bed.

I find Mr. Prin a good honest, playne man, but in his discourse not very free or pleasant.

Among all the tales that passed among us today, he told us of one Damford, that being a black* man did scaldb his beard with mince-pye, and it came up again all white in that place and so continued to his dying day. Sir W. Pen told us a good jest about some Gentlemen blinding of the drawer, and who he cached was to pay the recko[n]ing. And so they got away, and the master of the house coming up to see what his man did, his man got hold of him, thinking it to be one of the Gentlemen, and told him that he was to pay the reckoning.

pg 26310. office day all the morning. In the afternoon with the Upholster seeing him do things to my mind; and to my content he did fit my chamber and my wife's. At night comesa Mr. Moore and stayed late with me to tell me how Sir Hards: Waller (who only pleads guilty), Scott, Cooke, Peters, Harrison, &c. were this day arraigned at the bar at the Sessions-house, there being upon the bench the Lord Mayor, Generall Monke, my Lord of Sandwich, &c.; such a bench of noblemen as hath not been ever seen in England.1

They all seem to be dismayed and will all be condemned without Question. In Sir Orland. Brigeman's charge, he did wholly rip up the unjustnesse of the war against the King from the beginning, and so it much reflects upon all the Long Parliament; though the King hath pardoned them, yet they must hereby confess that the King doth look upon them as traytors.2

Tomorrow they are to plead what they have to say. At night to bed.

11. In the morning to my Lord's, where I met with Mr. Creed, and with him and Mr. Blackburne to the Rhenish wine-house – where we sat drinking of healthsb a great while, a thing which Mr. Blackburne formerly would not upon any terms have done.3 After we had done there, Mr. Creed and I to the Leg in King-street to dinner, where he and I and my Will had a good udder to dinner; and from thence to walk in St. James's Park – where we observed the several engines at work to draw up water, with which sight I was very much pleased.

Above all the rest, I liked best that which Mr. Greatorex pg 264brought, which is one round thing going within all with a pair of stairs round;a which being laid at an angle of 45 doth carry up the water with a great deal of ease.1 Here in the park we met with Mr. Salsbury, who took Mr. Creed and me to the Cockpitt2 to see The Moore of Venice, which was well done.3 Burt acted the Moore; by the same token, a very pretty lady that sot by me cried to see Desdimona smothered.

From thence with Mr. Creed to Hercles pillers, where he and I drank; and so parted and I went home.

12. office day all the morning. And from thence with Sir Wm Batten and the rest of the officers to a venison pasty of his at the Dolphin, where dined withal Collonell Washington, Sir Edw. Brett and Major Norwood, very noble company.4 After dinner I went home, where I found Mr. Cooke, who told me that my Lady Sandwich is come to town today, whereupon I went to Westminster to see her; and found her at supper, so she made me sit down all alone with her; and after supper stayed and talked with her – she showing most extraordinary love and kindness and did give me good assurance of my Uncles resolution to make me his heire.5 From thence home and to bed.

pg 26513. To my Lord's in the morning, where I met with Captain Cuttance. But my Lord not being up, I went out to Charing-cross to see Major-Generall Harrison hanged, drawn, and quartered – which was done there – he looking as cheerfully as any man could do in that condition.1 He was presently cut down and his head and his heart shown to the people, at which there was great shouts of joy. It is said that he said that he was sure to come shortly at the right hand of Christ to judge them that now have judged him. And that his wife doth expect his coming again.2

Thus it was my chance to see the King beheaded at White-hall3 and to see the first blood shed in revenge for the blood of the King at Charing-cross. From thence to my Lord's and took Captain Cuttance and Mr. Sheply to the Sun taverne and did give them some oysters. After that I went by water home, where I was angry with my wife for her things lying about, and in my passion kicked the little fine Baskett which I bought her in Holland and broke it, which troubled me after I had done it.

Within all the afternoon, setting up shelfes in my study. At night to bed.

14. Lords day. early to my Lord's, in my way meeting with Dr. Fairebrother, who walked with me to my father's back again; and there we drank our morning draught, my father being gone to church and my mother asleep in bed. Here he caused me to put my hand, among a great many Honourable hands, to a paper or Certificate on his behalfe.4

To White-hall Chappell, where one Dr Crofts made an indifferent sermon and after it an anthemne, ill sung, which made the King laugh. Here I first did see the Princesse Royall since she came into England. Here I also observed how the Duke of Yorke and Mrs. Palmer did talke to one another very wantonly pg 266through the hangings that parts the King's closet and the closet where the ladies sit.

To my Lord's, where I found my wife; and she and I did dine with my Lady (my Lord dining with my Lord Chamberlain), who did treat my wife with a very great deal of respect.

In the evening we went home through the rain by water in a sculler, having borrowed some coates of Mr. Sheply. So home wet and dirty, and to bed.

15. office all the morning. My wife and I by water; I landed her at White-friers, who went to my father's to dinner, it being my father's wedding day, there being a very great dinner and only the Fenners and Joyces there. 〈This morning Mr. Carew was hanged and quartered at Charing-Crosse – but his Quarters by a great favour are not to be hanged up.〉a1

I was forced to go to my Lord's to get him to meet the officers of the Navy this afternoon, and so could not go along with her. But I missed my Lord, who was this day upon the bench at the Sessions-house. So I dined there and went to White-hall, where I met with Sir W. Batten and Pen, who with the Comptroller, Treasurer, and Mr. Coventry (at his Chamber) made up a list of such ships as are fit to be kept out for the Winter guard2 – and the rest to be paid off by the Parliament when they can get money, which I doubt will not be a great while.

That done, I took Coach and called my wife at my father's; and so homewards, calling at Tho. Pepys the Turner's for some things that we wanted. And so home, where I fell to read The fruitlesse precaution (a book formerly recommended bya Dr Clerke at sea to me),3 which I read in bed till I had made an end of it and do find it the best-writ tale that ever I read in my life. After that done, to sleep, which I did not very well do because that pg 267my wife, having a stopping in her nose, she snored much, which I never did hear her do before.

16. This morning my Brother Tom came to me, with whom I made even for my last Cloathes to this day. And having eaten a dish of anchoves with him in the morning, my wife and I did entend to go forth to see a play at the Cockpitt1 this afternoon; but Mr. Moore coming to me, my wife stayed at home and he and I went out together, with whom I called at the upholsters and several other places that I have business with; and so home with him and from thence to the Cockpitt, where understanding that Wit without money2 was acted, I would not stay, but went home again by water, by the way reading of the other two stories that are in the book that I read last night, which I do not like so well as that.

Being come home, Will told me that my Lord hath a mind to speak with me tonight; so I returned by water, and coming there, it was only to enquire how the ships were provided with Victualls that are to go with him to fetch over the Queen,a 3 which I gave him a good account of.

He seemed to be in a melancholly humour, which I was told by W. Howe was for that he hath lately lost a great deal of money at cards, which he fears he doth too much addict himself to nowadays. So home by water and to bed.

17. office day. At noon comes Mr. Creede to me, whom I took along with me to the feathers in Fishstreete, where I was invited by Captain Cuttance to dinner – a dinner made by Mr. Dawes and his brother. We have two or three dishes of meat well done. Their great designeb was to get me concerned in a business of theirs about a vessel of theirs that is in the service, hired by the King,4 in which I promise to do them all the service pg 268I can. From thence home again with Mr. Creed; where I finding Mrs. The Turner and her aunt Dike, I would not be seen but walked in the garden till they were gone. Where Mr. Spong came to me. They being gone and Mr. Creed, Mr. Spong and I went to our Musique to sing; and he being gone, my wife and I went to put all my books in order in [my] closet, and I to give her her books. After that to bed.

18. This morning, it being expected that Collonell Hacker and Axtell should die, I went to Newgate but found that they were reprieved till tomorrow.1 So I to my aunt Fenners, where with her and my uncle I drank my morning draught. So to my father's and did give order for a pair of black bayes linings to be made me for my breeches against tomorrow morning, which was done.

So to my Lord's, where I spoke with him and he would have had me dine with him; but I went thence to Mr. Blackburnes, where I met my wife and my Will's father and mother (the first time that ever I saw them),2 where we have a very fine dinner. Mr. Creed was also there. This day, by her high discourse, I find Mrs. Blackburne to be a very high Dame and a Costly one.

Home with my wife by Coach. This evening comes Mr. Chaplin and N. Osborne3 to my house, of whom I made very much and kept them with me till late, and so to bed.

At my coming home, I find that The Turner hath sent for a pair of Doves that my wife hath promised her. And because she did not send them in the best Cage, she sent them back again with a Scornefull letter with which I was angry, and yet pretty well pleased that she was crossed.

pg 26919. office in the morning. This morning my Dining room was finished with greene Serge hanging and gilt leather, which is very handsome.1

This morning Hacker and Axtell were hanged and Quarterd, as the rest are.2

This night I sat up late to make up my accounts ready against tomorrow for my Lord; and I find him to be above 80l in my debt, which is a good sight and I bless God for it.

20. This morning one came to me to advise with me where to make me a window into my cellar in lieu of one that Sir W. Batten had stopped up; and going down into my cellar to look, I put my foot into a great heap of turds, by which I find that Mr. Turners house of office is full and comes into my cellar, which doth trouble me; but I will have it helped.3

To my Lord's by land, calling at several places about business. Where I dined with my Lord and Lady; where he was very merry and did talk very high how he would have a French Cooke and a Master of his Horse,4 and his lady and child to wear black paches; which methought was strange, but he is become a perfect Courtier; and among other things, my Lady saying that she would have a good Merchant for her daughter Jem, he answered that he would rather see her with a pedlar's pack at her back, so she married a Gentleman rather then that she should marry a Citizen.

This afternoon, going through London and calling at Crowes the upholster in Saint Bartholmew – I saw the limbs of some of our new Traytors set upon Aldersgate, which was a sad sight to see; and a bloody week this and the last have been, there being pg 270ten hanged, drawn, and Quarterd.1 Home; and after writing a letter to my Uncle by the post, I went to bed.

21. Lords day. To the Parish church in the morning, where a good sermon by Mr. Mills.

After dinner to my Lord's, and from thence to the Abby, where I met with Spicer and D. Vines and others of the old Crew:2 so leaving my boy at the abby against I came back, we went to Prices by the Hall back-doore; but there being no drink to be had,3 we went away; and so to the Crowne in the Palace-yarda – I and George Vines by the way calling at their house, where he carried me up to the top of his turret, where there is Cookes head set up for a traytor, and Harrison's on the other side of Westminster hall. Here I could see them plainly, as also a very fair prospect about London. From the Crowne to the Abbey to look for my boy, but he is gone thence; and so he being a novice, I was at a loss what was become of him. I called at my Lord's (where I found Mr. Adams, Mr. Sheply's friend) and at my father's, but found him not. So home, where I found him; but he had found the way home well enough, of which I was glad. So after supper and reading of some chapters,4 I went to bed. This day or two my wife hath been troubled with her boyles in the old place, which doth much trouble her.

Today at noon (God forgive me), I strung my Lute, which I have not touched a great while before.

22. office day. After that to dinner at home upon some ribbs of roast beef from the Cookes (which of late we have been forced to do because of our house being alway under the painters' and other people's hands, that we could not dress it ourselfs): after dinner to my Lord's, where I find all preparingb for my Lord's going to sea to fetch the Queene tomorrow.

At night my Lord came home, with whom I stayed long and talked of many things. Among others, I got leave of him to pg 271have his picture, that was done by Lilly, coppyed.1 And talking of religion, I find him to be a perfect Sceptique, and said that all things would not be well while there was so much preaching, and that it would be better if nothing but Homilys were to be read in churches.2

This afternoon (he told me), there hath been a meeting before the King and my Lord Chancellor of some Episcopalian and Presbyterian Divines; but what hath passed he could not tell me.3

After I had done talk with him, I went to bed with Mr. Sheply in his Chamber, but could hardly get any sleep all night, the bed being ill-made and he a bad bedfellow.

23. We rise early in the morning to get things ready for my Lord. And Mr. Sheply going to put up his pistolls (which were charged with bullets) into the Holsters, one of them flew off. And it pleased God, that the mouth of the gun being downward, it did us no hurt; but I think I never was in more danger in my life. Which put me into a great fright.

About 8 a-clock my Lord went; and going through the garden, my Lord met with Mr. Wm. Mountagu, who told him of an estate of land lately come into the King's hand, that he hath a mind my Lord should beg.4 To which end, my Lord writ a pg 272letter presently to my Lord Chancellor1 to do it for him; which (after leave taken of my Lord at White-hall bridge)2 I did carry to Warwick-house to him and have a fair promise of him that he would do it this day for my Lord. In my way thither I met the Lord Chancellor and all the Judges riding on Horse back and going to Westminster Hall, it being the first day of the Terme – which was the first time I ever saw any such Solemnity.3

Having done there, I returned to White-hall; where meeting with my Brother Ashwell and his Cosen Sam. Ashwell and Mr. Mallard, I took them to the Leg in King-street and gave them a dish of meat for dinner and paid for it. From thence going to White-hall, I met with Catau. Stirpin in mourning, who told me that her Mistress was lately dead of the small-pox and that herself was now married to Monsieur Petit, as also what her mistress hath left her, which was very well.4 She also took me to her Lodging at a Ironmongers in King-streete – which was but very poor; and I find by a letter that she showed me of her Husbands to the King that he is a right Frenchman and full of their own projects (he having a design to reforme the Universitys and to institute Schooles for the learning of all languages, to speak them naturally and not by rule), which I know will come to nothing.5

From thence to my Lord's, where I went forth by Coach to Mrs. Packer's with my Lady and so to her house again. From thence I took my Lord's picture and carried it to Mr. De Cretz to be copied.

So to White-hall, where I met Mr. Spong6 and went home with him and played and sang, and eat with him and his mother. pg 273After supper we looked over many books and instruments of his, especially his Wooden Jack in his Chimny that go with the Smoak; which indeed is very pretty.

I find him to be as ingenious and good-natured a man as ever I met with in my life and cannot admire him enough, he being so plain and illiterate a man as he is.

From thence by Coach home and to bed – which was welcome to me after a night's absence.

24. I lay and slept long today. Office day. I took occasion to be angry with my wife before I rise about her putting up of half a crowne of mine in a pepper box, which she hath forgot where she hath lain it. But we were friends again, as we are always. Then I rise to Jack Cole, who came to see me. Then to the office. So home to dinner – where I find Captain Murford, who did put 3l in my hands for a friendship I have done him; but I would not take it, but bid him keep it till he hath enough to buy my wife a necklace.1

This afternoon, people at work in my house to make a light in my yard into my sellar.

To White-hall; in my way met with Mr. Moore who went back with me.

He tells me among other things that the Duke of Yorke is now sorry for his lying with my Lord Chancellor's daughter, who is now brought to bed of a boy.2

From White-hall to Mr. De Cretz, who I find about my Lord's picture. From thence to Mr. Lilly's;3 where not finding Mr. Spong, I went to Mr. Greatorex, where I met him; and so to an alehouse, where I bought of him a drawing pen and he did show me the manner of the Lamp glasses, which carry the light a great way. Good to read in bed by and I intend to have one of them.

So to Mr. Lillys with Mr. Spong; where well received, there pg 274being a Clubb there tonight among his friends – among the rest, Esquire Ashmole,1 who I find a very ingenious Gentleman; with him we two sang afterward in Mr. Lillys study. That done, we all parted and I home by Coach, taking Mr. Booker2 with me – who did tell me a great many fooleries what may be done by Nativitys; and blaming Mr. Lilly for writing to please his friends and to keep in with the times (as he did formerly to his owne dishonour) and not according to the rules of Art, by which he could not well erre, as he hath done.3

I set him downe at Limestreete end; and so home, where I found a box of Carpenters tooles sent by my Cozen Tho. Pepys, which I have bespoake of him for to imploy myself with sometimes.

To bed.

25. All the day at home, doing something in order to the fitting of my house.

In the evening to Westminster about business: so home and to bed. This night the vault at the end of my Sellar was emptyed.4

26. office.

My father and Doctora Tho. Pepys dined at my house, the last of whom I did almost fox with Marget ale. My father is mightily pleased with my ordering of my house. I did give him money to pay several bills.

pg 275After that, I to Westminster to White-hall, where I saw the Duc de Soissons1 go from his audience with a very great deal of state. His own coach all red velvet, covered with gold lace, and drawn by six barbes, and attended with 20 pages very rich in clothes.

To Westminster-hall and bought, among other books, one of the Life of our Queene. Which I read at home to my wife; but it was so sillily writ that we did nothing but laugh at it: among other things, it is dedicated to that Paragon of virtue and beauty, the Duchesse of Albemarle.2

Great talk, as if the Duke of Yorke doth now own the marriage between him and the Chancellor's daughter.

27. In London and Westminster all this day, paying of money and buying of things for my house.

In my going, I went by chance by my new Lord Mayors house (Sir Rd. Browne) by goldsmiths hall, which is now in fitting; and endeed, it is a very pretty house.3

In coming back, I called at Pauls churchyard and there I bought Alsted, Encyclopædia,4 which cost me 38s.

pg 276Editor’s NoteHome and to bed – my wife being much troubled with her old pain.1

28. Lords day.

There came some pills and plaisters this morning from Dr. Williams for my wife.

I to Westminster Abbey, where with much difficulty going round by the Cloysters, I got in, this day being a great day for the Consacrating of five Bishopps, which was done after sermon;2 but I could not get into Hen. 7. chappell, so I went to my Lord's where I dined with my Lady and my young Lord and Mr. Sidny3 (who was sent for from Twicknham yesterday to see my Lord Mayors show tomorrow); Mr. Childe did also dine with us.

After dinner to White-hall Chappell; my Lady and my Lady Jemimah and I up to the King's Closet (who is now gone to meet the Queene); so meeting with one Mr. Hill,4 that did know my Lady, he did take us into the King's closet and there we did stay all the service time – which I thought a great honour.5

We went home to my Lord's lodgings afterward; and there I parted with my Lady and went home – where I did find my wife pretty well after her Phisique. So to bed.

29a I up earely, it being my Lord Mayors day6 (Sir Rich. pg 277Browne); and neglecting my office, I went to the Wardrobe, where I met my Lady Sandwich and all the Children. Where after drinking of some stranga and incomparable good Clarett of Mr. Rumballs,1 he and Mr. Townsend did take us and set the young Lords at one Mr. Nevills, a draper in Pauls churchyard; and my Lady and my Lady Pickering and I to one Mr. Isackson's, a linendraper at the Key in Cheapside – where there was a company of fine ladies and we were very civilly treated and had a very good place to see the pageants; which were many and I believe good for such kind of things but in themselfs but poor and absurd.2 After the ladies were placed, I took Mr. Townsend and Isackson to the next door, a tavern, and did spend 5s upon them. The show being done, with much ado we got as far as Pauls, where I left my Lady in the coach and went on foot with my Lady Pickering to her lodging, which was a poor one in Black-fryers, where she never invited me to go in at all with her – which methought was very strange for her to do.

So home, where I was told how my lady Davis3 was now come to our next lodgings and hath locked up the leads doore from me, which put me into so great a disquiet that I went to bed and could not sleep till morning at it.

30. Within all the morning and dined at home, my mind being so troubled that I could not mind nor do anything till I pg 278speak with the Comptroller to whom the lodgings belong. In the afternoon, to ease my mind, I went to the Cockpitt all alone and there saw a very fine play called The Tamer tamed,1 very well acted.

That being done, I went to Mr. Crews, where I had left my boy; and so with him and Mr. Moore (who would go a little way with me home, as he will always do) to the Hercules pillers to drink, where we did read over the King's Declaracion in matters of Religion, which is come out today. Which is very well penned I think; to the Satisfaccion of most people.2

So home, where I am told that Mr. Davis's people have broke open the bolt of my chamber door that go upon the leads; which I went up to see and did find it so, which did still trouble me more and more. And so I sent for Griffith3 and got him to search their house to see what the meaning of it might be; but can learn nothing tonight. But I am a little pleased that I have found this out.

I hear nothing yet of my Lord whether he be gone for the Queene from the Downes or no; but I believe he is, and that he is now upon coming back again.

31. office day. Much troubled all this morning in my mind about the business of my walk in the leades. I speak of it to the Comptroller and the rest of the principall officers, who are all unwilling to meddle in anything that may anger my Lady Davis; and so I am fain to give over for the time that she doth continue therein.

pg 279Dined at home; and after dinner to Westminster-hall, where I met with Billing the Quaker at Mrs. Michells shop, who is still of the former opinion he was of against the Clergymen of all sorts, and a cunning fellow I find him to be.1 Home, and there I have news that Sir W. Pen is resolved to ride to Sir W. Batten's country house2 tomorrow and would have me to go with him. So I sat up late, getting together my things to ride in, and was fain to cut a pair of old bootes to make leathers for those that I was to wear. To bed.

This month I conclude with my mind very heavy for the loss of the leades – as also for the greatnesse of my late expenses. Insomuch that I do not think that I have above 150l clear money in the world. But I have, I bless God, a great deal of good Houshold stuffe.

I hear today that the Queen is landed at Dover and will be here on Friday next the 2 of November.3

My wife hath been so ill of late of her old pain4 that I have not known her this fortnight almost, which is a pain to me.

Notes Settings

Notes

Editor’s Note
1. Wallpapers were not widely used until well on into the 18th century. Cf. below, pp. 261, 269.
Editor’s Note
2. William Brewer's bills (10 November 1660–24 June 1661) for 'divers painted workes' at the Navy Office and at several lodgings there, including Pepys's, are in PRO, Adm. 20/1, pp. 191, 197; ib., 20/2, p. 106. They amount to over £50. Pepys's house was clear of the painters by Christmas Day.
Editor’s Note
3. Cf. Rugge (i, f.134v: 'Nov. 1660. Great robings of houses and highways in and about London.' Albemarle on 28 August had issued an order forbidding soldiers to create disturbances at theatres: BM, Egerton 2542, f.405r.
Editor’s Note
1. During the voyage to Holland: see, e.g., above, p. 104.
Editor’s Note
2. Robert Scawen, whom Pepys knew well as a commissioner for disbanding the forces, had been recently appointed one of the commissioners for regulating the Excise. John Hunt either now or shortly afterwards held a sub-commissionership under him.
Editor’s Note
3. The pay due to him as secretary to Sandwich's regiment.
Editor’s Note
1. The King's Closet contained some of the most important and highly prized small pictures in the reconstituted royal collection. The inventory of Charles II's pictures (MS., c. 1667; in the office of the Surveyor of the Queen's Pictures) lists some 160 pictures, drawings and miniatures in this room (nos 305–465 in the section ff. 18–26 dealing with Whitehall). The illusionist picture is presumably A picture of a book upon the closet door, recorded in James II's collection: Cat. of the collection . . . belonging to King James the Second (1758), p. 12, no. 136. It was later at Kensington Palace, but is not recorded in the inventories of the royal collection after 1714. (OM).
Editor’s Note
2. The Royal African Company, incorporated 18 December 1660, consisted of the Duke of York and 31 others; Pembroke was the chairman of the governing body. Sandwich (with William Coventry and Carteret) became a member. C. T. Carr (ed.), Select charters of trading companies, 1530–1707, pp. 172–7.
Editor’s Note
3. On the Baltic voyage, 1659.
Editor’s Note
1. Sir Thomas Bendish, until 1660 ambassador at Constantinople; his aunt had married Pepys's great-uncle, John Pepys of Cottenham. He had five sons.
Editor’s Note
2. Accepted Frewen, formerly Bishop of Coventry and Lichfield.
Editor’s Note
3. I.e. Brian Duppa (recently translated from Salisbury), William Roberts, John Warner, William Pierce and Humphrey Henchman. The last-named was a bishop-designate, not being consecrated until 28 October.
Editor’s Note
4. A ship model. For Pepys's collection of them, see below, iii. 163 & n. 1.
Editor’s Note
1. For de Ligne's embassy, see above, p. 237 & n. 1. For his departure, see CSPVen. 1659–61, p. 207.
Editor’s Note
3. The Queen Mother, Henrietta-Maria.
Editor’s Note
4. William Spurstowe, a leading Presbyterian minister; recently made chaplain to the King. This was the only occasion on which he preached in the Chapel Royal: M. Sylvester, Reliq. Baxt. (1696), bk i, pt ii. 229.
Editor’s Note
1. Much of this is fabrication. Anne Hyde had secretly married the Duke at her father's house on 3 September; a son was born on 22 October. The Duke had entered a contract of marriage in November 1659. Sandwich was using French in front of the servants. For the public acknowledgement of the marriage, see below, p. 320 & n. 4.
Critical Apparatus
a l.h. repl. s.h. 'br'-
Editor’s Note
2. Untraced.
Editor’s Note
3. Thomas Fuller, The church-history of Britain, bk viii; PL 2437 (1656 ed.).
Editor’s Note
1. The Griffin and the Hector: PRO, Adm. 20/1, pp. 108, 109.
Editor’s Note
2. The portrait by Lely; for the portrait and Pepys's copy, see below, p. 271 & n. 1. (OM).
Critical Apparatus
a lower corner of page blotted
Editor’s Note
3. Probably the Great President: PRO, Adm. 20/1, pp. 108–9.
Critical Apparatus
b repl. 'slald'
Critical Apparatus
a l.h. repl. s.h. 'Mr.'
Editor’s Note
1. Sir Hardress Waller and 31 other regicides had been indicted before a grand jury of Middlesex on the previous day at Hicks's Hall; on this day began their trial at the Session House (Old Bailey) before a commission of oyer and terminer. Two (not one, as Pepys states) pleaded guilty – Waller and George Fleetwood: State Trials (ed. Howell), v. 998, 1005. The Lord Mayor was Sir Thomas Aleyn.
Editor’s Note
2. The charge given to the grand jury on the day before by Sir Orlando Bridgeman, Lord Chief Baron of the Exchequer, is printed in State Trials, v. 988–94. He was concerned to prove that levying war against the King's authority (as well as against the King himself) was treason. He did not mention the Long Parliament directly.
Critical Apparatus
b l.h. preceded by blot and s.h. 'healths'
Editor’s Note
3. Puritans objected to the drinking of healths as a pagan custom.
Critical Apparatus
a 'round' repeated
Editor’s Note
1. Probably a version of the Archimedean screw – a wooden spiral tube consisting of a worm inside a cylinder. Cf. the fire-engine worked by 'a sucking-worm': J. Houghton, Coll. for improvement of husbandry and trade, 9 August 1695 (engravings in PL 2972, pp. 76–7, 78). For the improvements being made at this time in the gardens and the lake, see above, p. 246; and cf. CTB, i. 693. Ralph Greatorex was an inventor and mathematical instrument maker.
Editor’s Note
2. In Drury Lane. From 8 October until 4 November 1660 this theatre was used by a new troupe known as His Majesty's Comedians, including Mohun, Hart, Clun and Cartwright from the Red Bull Theatre and Burt, Betterton and Kynaston from the former Cockpit company. (A).
Editor’s Note
3. Cast in Downes, pp. 6–7. The play was Shakespeare's Othello, which had been acted in 1604 and published in 1622. (A).
Editor’s Note
4. All three were officers high in the King's favour.
Editor’s Note
5. Robert Pepys lived at Brampton near Hinchingbrooke, whence Lady Sandwich had just returned.
Editor’s Note
1. Thomas Harrison, the regicide, had been condemned on the 11th. Cf. his hagiographer: he was 'mighty cheerful to the astonishment of many': The speeches and prayers of Maj. Gen. Harrison . . . (1660), p. 6. Secretary Nicholas reported that he died 'under a hardness of heart that created horror in all who saw him': CSPD 1660–1, p. 312.
Editor’s Note
2. The views attributed to Harrison and his wife were commonly attributed to all Fifth-Monarchists.
Editor’s Note
3. See below, p. 280.
Editor’s Note
4. An ex-royalist, he was job hunting. Cf. also above, p. 69 & n. 1.
Critical Apparatus
a addition crowded into bottom of page
Editor’s Note
1. John Carew was a regicide, but also (being a republican and a Fifth-Monarchist) an opponent of Cromwell. The Commons had only by a small majority excepted him from the Act of Indemnity, and now, after his condemnation and execution, his quarters were granted to his brother and given decent burial that night.
Editor’s Note
2. Thirty-five are listed in PRO, Adm. 2/1745, f.11r. Large ships were unable to ride out the winter seas.
Critical Apparatus
b l.h. repl. s.h. 'to'
Editor’s Note
1. In Drury Lane. (A).
Editor’s Note
2. A comedy by John Fletcher, first acted c. 1614 and published in 1639. (A).
Critical Apparatus
a followed by blot
Editor’s Note
3. See above, p. 260.
Critical Apparatus
b l.h. repl. s.h. 'dis'-
Editor’s Note
4. Probably the Seaflow ketch of 50 tons, hired on 24 June 1660 at £18 per month, of which Henry Dawes was part-owner. But she was not released until February 1662. PRO, Adm. 20/3, p. 76.
Editor’s Note
1. Col. Francis Hacker and Col. Daniel Axtel had been condemned as regicides on the 15th. Hacker had commanded the guard at the King's execution; Axtel at his trial: State Trials (ed. Howell), v. 1146–85. The reprieve was possibly ordered out of consideration for Hacker's relatives, some of whom were royalists and were allowed the disposal of his body: CSPD 1660–1, pp. 316, 339, 494. Peter Mundy (v. 126) says that it was because the 18th was St Luke's day.
Editor’s Note
2. Thomas Hewer, of St Sepulchre's parish, was a stationer who supplied the Navy Office.
Editor’s Note
3. Both were concerned with navy victualling. Francis Chaplin was a provision merchant and Osborne was (now or later) clerk to Denis Gauden, the navy victualler.
Editor’s Note
1. The serge would be for curtains and the gilt leather for the walls.
Editor’s Note
2. Of these two only Axtel's body was quartered: Merc. Pub., 25 October, p. 674.
Editor’s Note
3. Water-closets had not yet been adopted even by the well-to-do. They are said to have been invented by Sir John Harington (a godson of Queen Elizabeth who published books on the subject), but required a good water-supply and elaborate plumbing. Lawrence Wright, Clean and decent, passim, esp. pp. 71–3.
Editor’s Note
4. On 15 November Lady Sandwich was to hire a French maid, and not long afterwards Sandwich had a suit costing £200 made in France for the coronation (below, ii. 83) and appointed Ferrer as his Master of the Horse. For the spread of French influences, see C. Bastide, Anglo-French entente in 17th cent., ch. iv.
Editor’s Note
1. Cf. Merc. Pub., 25 October, p. 677; Mundy, v. 126–7.
Editor’s Note
2. Exchequer colleagues.
Editor’s Note
3. Perhaps because it was service time: cf. above, p. 54 & n. 1.
Critical Apparatus
a followed by blot
Editor’s Note
4. Of the Bible: see above, p. 206 n. 2.
Critical Apparatus
b l.h. repl. s.h. 'pre'-
Editor’s Note
1. Lely had already painted at least two portraits of Sandwich; this was probably the portrait (head and shoulders in black, wearing the insignia of the Garter) later at Hinchingbrooke. The copyist was Emanuel de Critz: see below, pp. 290, 292, 301. The copy was bought at the Pepys Cockerell sale of 1848 by Lord Braybrooke and is now at Audley End: R. J. B. Walker, Audley End . . . Cat. of the pictures (1954), p. 7. De Critz made a repetition from Pepys's copy (below, p. 292), and copies of the design are not uncommon, e.g. in the National Portrait Gallery (609). (OM).
Editor’s Note
2. A common view among the upper classes. The homilies issued by royal authority (2 vols, 1547, 1571; PL 2376 [1673 ed.]) enjoined political obedience, and were used as substitutes for sermons by parsons not licensed to preach.
Editor’s Note
3. The conference at Worcester House, resulting in the issue of the King's Declaration of 25 October: see below, p. 278. The meeting had been broken up by the news that the Duchess of York was in labour, and none of the participants seems to have been sure what had been agreed on.
Editor’s Note
4. On 2 November a warrant was issued for the grant to Sandwich of the manors of Liveden and Church-field, Northants.: CSPD 1660–1, p. 351.
Editor’s Note
1. Presumably a mistake for 'my Lord Chamberlain', the Earl of Manchester (Sandwich's cousin) who lived at Warwick House.
Editor’s Note
2. The public pier and landing stairs for the palace. (R).
Editor’s Note
3. The procession, later discontinued because of Clarendon's gout, was revived by Shaftesbury, but only once, in 1673, allegedly because of the judges' indifferent horsemanship: Louise F. Brown, Shaftesbury, p. 217.
Editor’s Note
4. Elizabeth Pye, her mistress, had left her the sum of £200, her wearing apparel and her linen.
Editor’s Note
5. Nothing appears to be known of this proposal. For methods of teaching languages, see K. Lambley, Teaching of French language. Pepys's scepticism about Frenchmen derived perhaps from experience of his father-in-law's projects.
Editor’s Note
6. John Spong, mathematical instrument maker.
Editor’s Note
1. William Murford was a timber merchant and entrepreneur. He was soon to offer Pepys a share in a lighthouse project (below, ii. 41) and from the beginning of his acquaintance with Pepys had pressed gifts on him (e.g. above, p. 177). The diary records no gift of a necklace by him to Mrs Pepys.
Editor’s Note
2. Charles, Duke of Cambridge, b. 22 October; d. 5 May 1661.
Editor’s Note
3. William Lilly, astrologer, of the Strand.
Editor’s Note
1. Elias Ashmole, antiquary and herald; a friend of Lilly and much concerned with astrology, who had this day taken up his duties as a Comptroller of the Excise for London: C. H. Josten (ed.), Ashmole, ii. 800.
Editor’s Note
2. John Booker, astrologer.
Editor’s Note
3. Lilly was mercenary by his own confession (see his Hist. of his life and times, 1822, esp. p. 88), and was suspected of having been in the pay of every successive government of the past twenty years. Certainly his popular annual almanacks successfully adjusted themselves to each change of régime. He claimed, however, that the government pension he had been given in 1648 was for only two years, and for foreign intelligence, not astrological prophecy: op. cit., pp. 145–6. In 1660 his almanacks lay under some disrepute because of his failure to foresee any of the changes in English government in 1659–60, or the defeat and death of his foreign patron, Charles Gustavus of Sweden.
Editor’s Note
4. Turner, Pepys's neighbour, charged the Navy Treasury on 26 October with 31s. 7d. for this operation: PRO, Adm. 20/1, p. 133.
Critical Apparatus
a l.h. repl. s.h. 'my'
Editor’s Note
1. Recte the Comte de Soissons, French ambassador-extraordinary sent to congratulate Charles II on his restoration. The audience had been held in the Banqueting House of Whitehall; he was now returning to Somerset House. Other descriptions in Parl. Intell., 29 October, p. 702; Rugge, i, f.131r.
Editor’s Note
2. John Dauncey, The history of the thrice illustrious Princess Henrietta Maria de Bourbon, Queen of England, just published, was inscribed to 'the Paragon of Vertue and Beauty, her Grace, the Dutchesse of Aubemarle'. The epistle dedicatory ended with the prayer 'that the Rising Sun of your Graces Vertues and Honours may still soar higher, but never know a declension'. The rest of the book was in similar style. Not in the PL. To most people (including Pepys) the Duchess was a slut.
Editor’s Note
3. Before the building in the 18th century of the Mansion House as an official residence for the Lord Mayor, each kept his mayoralty in his own house or in one acquired for it. Browne kept his in Camden House, Maiden Lane (now Gresham St), north of Goldsmiths' Hall, then or later the house of Ald. Sir Thomas Bludworth: Rugge, i, f.125r; Stow, Survey (ed. Strype, 1720), bk v. 147. (R).
Editor’s Note
4. A Latin work compiled by Johann Heinrich Alsted (d. 1638), German Protestant divine and pedagogue; arranged (as was usual until the early 18th century) by subjects, not alphabetically; a very influential encyclopaedia in its day: in Cotton Mather's words, 'a North-West Passage to all the Sciences': qu. S. E. Morison, Harvard Coll. in 17th cent., i. 158. PL 2523–4 (1st ed., 2 vols, folio, Herborn 1630) may be the copy here referred to.
Editor’s Note
Hill, October. Clearly (i.276) a different man from the foregoing (though also living in St Margaret's parish). Possibly Thomas Hill, in 1663 a messenger of the chamber. He may be the Thomas Hill of Gray's Inn who married Elinor Webb on 18 Sept. 1655 at St Margaret's. She was a widow by 1665.1
Editor’s Note
Hill, . (ii) 1 Bull. IHR, 19/18; Westminster Abbey Muniments, Reg. St Margaret's (ref. from H. M. Nixon); WRO, E 1613
Editor’s Note
2. The first consecration of bishops since 1644. The service was conducted by Brian Duppa, Bishop of Winchester; the preacher John Sudbury, Prebendary of Westminster. The new bishops were those of London (Sheldon), Salisbury (Henchman), Worcester (Morley), Lincoln (Sanderson) and St Asaph (Griffith). After further consecrations in the following December and January only two sees remained to be filled. J. Sudbury, Sermon preached at the consecration of . . . Gilbert, Lord Bishop of London . . . (1660); Parl. Intell., 29 October, p. 702; Rugge, i, f.131r.
Editor’s Note
3. Sandwich's sons here referred to were Viscount Hinchingbrooke (whom Pepys has previously called 'Mr Edward' or 'the child') and Sidney, his younger brother.
Editor’s Note
4. Probably Roger Hill, musician of the Chapel Royal.
Editor’s Note
5. Admission to the King's Closet (where the royal entourage assembled before proceeding into chapel) was in theory limited to peers, privy councillors, and gentlemen of the bedchamber: BM, Stowe 562, f.7r–v.
Critical Apparatus
a blot in MS.
Editor’s Note
6. The date of Lord Mayor's Day was altered from 29 October to 9 November after the calendar reform of 1752, when eleven days were cancelled from the English calendar.
Critical Apparatus
a possibly 'strange'
Editor’s Note
1. William Rumbold; he and Thomas Townshend were officials of the King's Wardrobe.
Editor’s Note
2. Described by John Tatham (author of the verses declaimed on this occasion) in The royale oake, with other various and delightfull scenes presented on the water and the land, celebrated in honour of the deservedly honoured Sir Richard Brown . . . (1660); reprinted in R. T. D. Sayle, Lord Mayors' pageants of the Merchant Taylers' Co., pp. 130+. The tableaux consisted of scenes peopled with allegorical figures who gave tongue in verse written for the occasion. They greeted the Lord Mayor on his progress by water in the morning to the law courts at Westminster, and on his progress after the Guildhall dinner to his house. See F. W. Fairholt, Lord Mayors' pageants (1843–4); R. Withington, Engl. Pageantry; and cf. A calendar of dramatic records in the books of the Livery Companies of London, 1485–1640 (Malone Soc., Collections, vols iii and v).
Editor’s Note
3. Wife of John Davis, just appointed clerk to Lord Berkeley of Stratton, Navy Commissioner.
Editor’s Note
1. Designed as a sequel to Shakespeare's The taming of the shrew, John Fletcher's comedy, The woman's prize, or The tamer tamed, was first acted about 1606 and published in 1647. The theatre was the Cockpit in Drury Lane. (A).
Editor’s Note
2. His Majestie's declaration to all his loving subjects . . . concerning ecclesiastical affairs; issued on 25 October: copy in BM, E 1075 (20), dated 30 October; reprinted in E. Cardwell (ed.), Doc. annals Church of Engl. (1844), ii. 285–301; probably written by Hyde, but based, to a remarkable extent, on draft proposals made by the Presbyterians; generally known as the Worcester House Declaration. It promised a limited episcopacy and referred disputed points of liturgy and ceremonial to a synod. There is no doubt that it pleased all moderate Presbyterians; see, e.g., below, pp. 282–3. But it came to nothing when the Commons rejected a bill confirming it in the following November.
Editor’s Note
3. William Griffith (Griffin), doorkeeper to the Navy Office.
Editor’s Note
1. A government agent wrote of Edward Billing in 1662: 'noe man more busie sturring up and downe, inquyreing after newes then he': Extracts from State Papers . . . 1654–72 (ed. N. Penney), p. 156.
Editor’s Note
2. The Rectory Manor House, Church Hill, Walthamstow, Essex. Penn later had a house not far away at Wanstead.
Editor’s Note
3. The Queen [Mother] had landed at Dover on the 30th. Cf. CSPD 1660–1, p. 326.
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