Main Text

DAGENHAMS (Dagnams), Essex:
P visits for wedding, 6/175–7;
his other visits, 6/158–61, 167, 180–1; 7/17–18;
gallery, 6/159, 160;
gardens, 6/160;
buttery, 6/180;
also, 6/163, 173, 188, 193, 225
DAKING (Deking), Capt. [George], naval officer:
discharged, 1/109 & n. 2, 110; (?the same), 3/50
DALMAHOY (Dormehoy), [Thomas]:
on Naseby, 1/134 & n. 6
DALTON, [Richard], Serjeant of the Wine-cellar to the King:
buys lease of P's house in Axe Yard, 1/235, 244–8 passim; social: 4/4
[DALZIEL, Lt-Gen. Thomas]:
defeats Scots rebels, 7/390 & n. 6
DAMFORD, [D]: anecdote about, 1/262
pg 79DAMPORT: see Davenport
DANCING:
P dances for first time, 2/61, 71; 7/18;
dislikes/disapproves of, 2/212; 4/176; 6/79;
admires at court, 3/300–1; 6/29;
takes lessons/practises, 4/111, 122, 124, 126, 129, 132, 133, 134, 141, 149, 150, 153, 161, 265;
finds useful for a gentleman, 4/122;
Sandwich's dancing-master, 2/117;
dancing at court, 3/300–1; 5/56; 6/29; 7/341, 371–3; 9/507;
King's French dancing-master, 9/507;
dancing schools: in Broad St, 1/253;
Fleet St, 2/212;
in city, 4/107;
Bow, 7/238;
at private parties: 6/262, 279, 284; 7/73, 230, 263, 360, 362, 363, 422; 8/28–9, 104, 493, 511; 9/8, 12–13, 42, 128, 134, 172, 227, 458, 464, 511;
at schools: 8/392, 396;
theatres: 3/32; 8/27, 101, 171, 375, 388, 440, 451, 487; 9/24, 48, 107, 144, 183–4, 219, 420, 459;
particular dances: branle, 3/300; 7/372;
coranto (courant), 3/300; 4/122, 124, 126; 6/88 & n. 1; 7/372;
Cuckolds all a'row, 3/300–1;
country, 3/300–1; 4/126, 149, 150, 161; 8/232; 9/464;
French, 7/372;
La Duchesse, 4/141, 265;
military, 8/451; 9/459;
morris, 4/120;
Spanish, 9/440
DANCKERTS (Dancre), [Hendrick], painter (d.? 1680):
paintings for P's dining room, 9/421, 423 & n. 1, 434, 487;
of Greenwich Palace, 9/438, 445, 465, 485;
Rome substituted for Hampton Court, 9/504;
painting of Windsor, 9/539;
of Tangier, 9/541 & n. 2
DANIEL, [Richard], of the Victualling Office: 1/249;
death, 5/286
DANIEL, [Samuel], naval officer:
wife solicits commission for, 6/335; 7/417; 8/367;
on Royal Charles, 7/141;
brings news of Four Days Fight, 7/145–7;
social: 8/76;
alluded to: 6/336
DANIEL, Mrs [D], of Greenwich, wife of Samuel: fondled by Lord Rutherford, 6/274;
with child, 6/274, 336;
dogged by P, 6/332(2);
asks favour for husband, 6/335; 7/417; 8/233, 244, 367;
P kisses, 6/336; 7/202; ?brings news of plague, 7/236;
fondled by P, 7/417; 8/233, 244, 282; 9/132, 248;
tries to borrow money from, 9/306;
also, 7/7;
social: at Greenwich, 6/315, 333, 338; 7/141;
at P's house/office, 7/211, 341; 8/45, 76; 9/265;
~ her son, 7/128; ?her mother-in-law, 7/341
DANVERS, Col. [Henry], Fifth-Monarchist:
arrest and escape, 6/184 & n. 3
DARCY, [Marmaduke], Cavalier: on Naseby, 1/154, 157;
alluded to: 2/29
DARCY, Sir William:
Fishery business, 3/269–70 & n.
[DARLING, Edward and Thomas] see Taverns etc.: Three Tuns, Charing Cross
DARNELL, [?Richard, jun.], musician:
P buys music from, 8/24–5
DARTFORD, Kent:
P visits, 2/15, 16, 17, 57, 72; 6/242; 9/495, 499;
post-house, 2/17;
alluded to: 2/32
DARTMOUTH, Devon:
Straits fleet at, 8/345
DASHWOOD, Ald. [Francis]: 6/182
DA SILVA, Don Duarte, merchant: 3/114 & n. 2
DAVENANT, Sir William, playwright and producer [see also Musical Compositions; Plays]:
reinstates Harris, 4/239 & n. 3, 347;
opera The siege of Rhodes, 6/284 & n. 1; 8/25, 59;
allegedly taught by Capt. H. Cooke, 8/59;
criticised by Dr Clerke, ib.; death and burial, 9/156 & n. 1, 158 & n. 3;
~ his sons, 9/158 & n. 4
DAVENPORT, [Frances], actress:
leaves stage, 9/156 & n. 2
[DAVENPORT, Hester] ('Roxalana'), actress:
leaves stage to live with Earl of Oxford, 3/32 & n. 6, 58 & n. 3, 86;
alluded to: 3/273, 295
DAVENPORT (Damport), [?John], of Brampton, Hunts.:
social: 2/24, 137, 208, 210, 213
DAVIES, [John], Storekeeper, Deptford:
character, 1/286; 4/151;
P stays with, 2/12;
complains of treatment under Commonwealth, 1/308;
his stores, 3/111, 173;
bookkeeping, 3/129, 234;
in disputes over contracts, 4/73 & n. 2, 151 & n. 1;
also, 2/13;
pg 80alluded to: 4/318;
~ his wife, 2/12;
his kinswoman, 3/129
DAVIES, [Thomas], bookseller and P's schoolfellow:
heir to T. Audley, 3/264 & n. 2;
knighted as sheriff, 8/497
DAVIS (Davy), [John], clerk to Lord Berkeley of Stratton:
P's dislike, 2/26; 3/259;
attempted burglary at house, 1/305;
news from, 2/10;
to go to Ireland, 2/55;
alluded to: 1/289, 291, 315; 2/9; 4/408
DAVIS, Jack, son of the foregoing, Navy Office clerk:
lends Tower Hill lodgings to P, 3/182, 188–209 passim; alleged fraud by, 4/152;
Batten wants dismissed, 5/32;
social: ?1/289; ?2/8, 26;
~ his Tower Hill landlord, 3/200
DAVIS, [Jane], ('Lady Davis'), wife of John, clerk to Berkeley:
P's dislike, 2/55; 3/259;
annoys P by closing door to leads, 1/277;
resents EP's neglect, 2/10;
to go to Ireland, 2/55;
social: 2/25–6;
alluded to: 2/114
DAVIS, Mary (Mall), actress:
(untrue) rumour of death, 7/102 & n. 1;
role in Richard III, 8/101 & n. 4;
in Love-tricks, 8/375 & n. 2;
her dancing, 8/101, 375; 9/24, 219;
leaves stage to become King's mistress, 9/19 & n. 3, 24 & n. 2, 219, 388, 422, 450;
alleged parentage, 9/24 & n. 2
DAVIS, [Thomas], messenger, Admiralty office: 1/103
DAVIS, Mr [D]:
employs Wayneman Birch, 4/382
DAVY:
DAWES, [Henry], merchant:
shipping business, 1/267 & n. 4;
a slave in Algiers, 2/34
DAWES, Sir [John], merchant:
clandestine marriage, 4/121–2 & n., 269, 355;
baronetcy, 4/269
DAWS, Mr [D] [?identical with Henry Dawes]: 1/147
[DAWSON, William], naval officer: 9/488 & n. 2
DAY, [John], of Leverington, Cambs., P's great-uncle by marriage:
P's claim on estate, 4/231 & n. 1, 300 & n. 2, 310–12
DAY, [John], 'old Day', fishmonger: 5/53
DAY, [D], carpenter: 1/78
DEAL, Kent:
fleet off, 1/105–34 passim; forts near, 1/105 & n. 3;
provisions from, 1/107, 134, 136;
P visits, 1/119 & n. 4;
Fuller's tavern, 1/119;
Poole's, ib.; royalist demonstrations, 1/121(2), 129, 163;
naval guns heard, 6/65;
plague, 7/241 & n. 3;
alluded to: 1/134; 5/212; 6/29
DEAN, Forest of:
storm damage, 3/35 & n. 5;
(1362), 3/165;
ironworks, ib. & n. 1;
'forbid' trees, ib. & n. 2;
timber, 4/20;
alluded to: 3/114
DEANE, Anthony, kted 1675, shipwright:
character:
able but conceited, 3/170 & n. 1; 4/124, 176, 236, 381; 5/130; 9/152;
a fanatic, 5/203
relations with p:
instructs P in timber measurement, 3/151, 163, 169; 4/189–90;
demonstrates slide-rule, 4/124;
gives P ship model, 3/163 & n. 1, 208;
instructs about ships/ship-building, 4/157, 172, 236, 262, 396; 5/29–30, 144, 146, 159, 189, 309; 8/489; 9/250; 'Doctrine of Naval Architecture' written at P's request, 9/531 & n. 1;
tells of abuses in yards, 4/19, 79, 219; 8/489; 9/249;
gift to P, 6/338;
offers money, 9/528;
P's gift to, 9/531
navy board business:
rivalry with Petts, 3/170;
complains of timber, 4/326;
of timber contract, 4/381;
and of colleagues, 4/384, 433;
to fell Clarendon's timber, 5/203, 205, 210, 214, 238;
discusses shipbuilding with Brouncker, 6/281;
his Rupert praised by King and Duke of York, 7/119, 127;
his drawing of, 8/142 & n. 2;
and of Resolution, 9/262 & n. 4;
his calculations of ship's draught, 7/127–8 & n.;
his fireship design, 8/358 & n. 1;
and gun design, 9/528 & n. 1;
also, 5/155, 308–9; 8/39;
unspecified business, 4/176, 425; 5/137; 9/175
social: 4/141, 318; 5/185; 6/282
DEBUSSY (Debusty), [Lawrence], merchant:
his tallies, 6/224 & n. 2;
letter of credit, 7/174;
poor English, 7/404;
~ his house and fine tapestry, 7/174
DEKING:
see Daking
DEKINS:
pg 81DELABARR, [Vincent], merchant:
DELAUNE, [George], merchant, Lothbury, and wife [Dorothea]:
death, with family, in fire, 3/296 & n. 4
DELFT:
P visits, 1/145–7;
description, 1/145–6 & nn.;
regicides arrested, 3/45, 47
DELKES 'old', waterman:
appeals to P against son-in-law's impressment, 6/187, 202
DELL, [William], formerly Rector of Yelden, Beds.:
his puritanism, 3/123 & n. 1
DENHAM, Sir John, poet and Surveyor-General of the King's Works:
alterations at Hinchingbrooke, 1/313, 314 & n. 1;
attends coronation, 2/83;
as friend of Mennes, 4/436–7;
pox cured by Mennes, 5/242;
builds Burlington House, Piccadilly, 6/39 & n. 2; 9/321;
DENHAM, [Margaret], Lady Denham, wife of Sir John:
liaison with Duke of York, 7/158–9 & n., 297, 315, 320, 323, 404–5;
cabals with Coventry and Brouncker, 7/323;
with Bristol, 7/404–5 & n.;
rumoured poisoning by Duchess of York, 7/365 & n. 2, 366, 405; 8/6 & n. 2;
postmortem, 8/8;
house in Scotland Yard, 7/158
DENMARK [see also Copenhagen;
Frederick III; Zeeland]: peace with, 8/399 & n. 1, 426 & n. 2;
also, 1/41, 43, 83; 6/229
DEPTFORD, Kent [see also Baddiley, W.; Carteret, Sir G.; Cowley, T.; Davis, John; Pett, Christopher; Trinity House; Uthwayt, J.]:
town:
storm, 4/317–18;
pretty woman at, 8/141, 170 & n. 6;
Balty St Michel lives at, 9/195, 261, 349;
P to live with him, 9/349, 369;
church [St Nicholas], 2/12 & n. 1;
Globe, 1/254; 2/12, 77; 3/274; 6/96, 201; 7/285;
ferry, 6/167;
King's Head, 6/295;
upper town, 6/331;
Halfway tree, 8/188
dockyard:
general: guard, 2/11, 12–13, 15;
royal yachts at, 2/14, 120;
ships built, 2/14 & n. 4; 5/24–5 & n.;
launched, 7/160 & n. 3;
project for new dock, 3/18 & n. 1, 29, 30 & n. 1, 32–3;
timber frames for Navy Office houses built at, 3/111, 179, 188, 203;
fire, 5/257;
Navy Board meets at during Plague, 6/173, 184;
plague in ships, 6/189, 204;
workmen sent to fight Fire, 7/274, 276;
P stores goods at during Fire, 7/273, 276, 278, 285, 290;
Elizabethan wreck discovered, 8/188;
measures taken against Dutch raiders, 8/256–7 & n., 259, 270, 282, 313; Maybolt at, 8/503–4; 9/29
visits by p (sometimes with colleagues) on official business: pays: 1/253–4, 283, 286 & n. 2; 3/53 & n. 1, 58, 124, 179–80 & n., 185 & n. 1, 192, 193 & n. 2, 195, 198, 200–1 & n.; 4/7, 386 & n. 1, 425; 7/339;
criticises method, 4/319 & n. 2;
shipping: ships fitted out/provisioned/despatched: 2/104, 112, 127; 3/31, 51, 63; 4/103–4; 5/165, 176; 7/157, 158, 162, 176(2), 177, 181; 8/176;
measured, 5/217; 7/69;
built, 8/124;
launched, 9/101 & n. 2;
inspects stores, 3/129, 173, 188; 4/79(2), 219;
flags, 3/149; 4/151; 5/182;
masts, 3/273–4;
plank, 4/266;
ironwork, 5/16; 7/119;
canvas, 5/106, 155;
poop lantern, 5/116–17;
cordage, 5/287;
timber, 5/312;
and wet dock, 8/188;
at musters, 3/160 & n. 1; 4/15, 50, 80, 222;
consults officers about call-books, 3/234; 4/7, 15, 80;
investigates fire risks, 4/7;
leases ground for mast-dock, 5/231 & n. 1;
pg 82VISITS BY P ON PRIVATE BUSINESS [see also Bagwell, Mrs]: 4/205; 6/155; 9/261;
stores goods at in Fire, 7/273, 276, 278, 285, 290
visits by p's colleagues on official business: pays: 1/262 & n. 1, 290; 2/94, 171; 3/128; 4/126, 175; 6/319;
sales: 3/180;
surveys: 5/35, 39;
DERING, Sir Edward, 2nd Bt:
contract for timber, 6/77 & n. 3
DERING, Edward, kted 1680, merchant, half-brother of the foregoing:
appointed King's merchant, 4/415 & n. 4; 5/6;
P critical of, 5/331; 6/245;
gives/offers presents to P, 4/415, 422, 426, 436; 5/1, 5, 8, 330–1; 6/185, 242, 245;
contracts for deals, 4/415 & n. 4;
hemp, 6/77;
provisions at Hamburg, 9/542;
unspecified business, 6/304
[DERWENTDALE PLOT, the]: 4/377 & n. 1
DESBOROUGH, Maj.-Gen. John, Cromwellian general:
disloyalty to Richard Cromwell, 1/21 & n. 4;
released from Tower, 8/169 & n. 4
DESCARTES, René:
works studied at Cambridge, 4/263 & n. 2
DEVEREUX, Robert, 3rd Earl of Essex, parliamentary general:
bust at Swakeleys, 6/215 & n. 1;
lying in state, 9/425 & n. 3
DE VIC, [Anne Charlotte], daughter of Sir Henry:
at court ball, 3/301 & n. 2
DEVONSHIRE HOUSE, Bishopsgate St:
burial, 8/101
DIAMOND, Capt. [Thomas], naval officer:
acquitted of murder, 3/124;
bawdy remarks about King's marriage, ib.
DIARIES:
Sir W. Rider's, 5/98;
Sir W. Coventry's, 9/475
DIARY (P):
general:
tells Lieut. Lambert of it, 1/107;
and Coventry, 9/475
the manuscript:
sent away during Fire, 7/272, 282;
during Medway raid, 8/264;
volumes covering two years, 4/205; 6/143; 'bye-book', 5/25
the shorthand: described, vol. i, pp. xlviii–liv; changes symbol for full stop, 8/104
editions:
by Lord Braybrooke, first (1825), vol. i, pp. lxxv–lxxxiii; second (1828), vol. i, p. lxxxiii; third (1848–9), vol. i, pp. lxxxiii–iv; fourth (1851), vol. i, p. lxxxv; fifth (1854), vol. i, pp. lxxxv–vi; by Mynors Bright (1875–9): vol. i, pp. lxxxvii–xci; by H. B. Wheatley (1893–9): vol. i, pp. xc–xcvi
criticism etc.:
value as historical evidence, vol. i, pp. cxiv–cxxxvii;
literary style, vol. i, pp. civ–vi, cx–xiii;
P's motives in keeping, vol. i, pp. xxvi–vii, cvi–cx, cxiv
method of composition: vol. i, pp. xcvii–ciii;
enters up journeys, 2/73, 96, 140; 3/77, 226; 4/316; 8/316;
his 'old way' of entering it daily, 6/270;
enters account of Fire from loose leaves, 7/318, 402; 8/18;
rough notes bound in, 9/160–8, 224–43;
vows to keep, 5/25; 7/15, 25, 35, 40;
enters it [normally at home or in his office but exceptionally]: on board ship, 1/152;
at Admiralty, 1/204;
on yacht, 6/240;
in lodgings, 6/307, 337;
writes it for stated periods, in days: one day, 3/141, 177, 215; 4/54, 128, 193, 273, 352, 378, 429, 438; 5/357; 7/421; 8/341; 9/424;
two days, 1/143, 164; 7/74; 8/30, 162;
two-three, 3/96; 4/2; 8/557;
three, 2/88; 4/6, 252; 7/61, 262; 8/57, 391; 9/89, 386;
three-four, 1/243; 7/299;
four-five, 9/397;
five-six, 2/81; 9/409;
six, 2/185; 4/231;
six-seven, 9/363–4;
seven, 6/240; 9/295, 433, 451, 492;
seven-eight, 7/35, 40;
eight, 6/270;
eight-nine, 6/337;
twelve, 6/307; 9/533;
thirteen (from memory), 6/295;
fourteen, 9/516;
enters/writes it for unstated periods: 1/18; 2/241; 3/137, 162, 243, 251; 4/41, 67, 350, 356, 364, 423; 6/201; 7/25, 49, 63, 109, 167, 168, 170, 182, 205, 249, 258, 283, 291, 315, 323, 375, 385, 397; 8/3, 7, 17, 82, 114, 189, 271, 465, 478, 535, pg 83579; 9/28, 331, 372, 455, 460, 473, 482, 500, 545
p's comments while writing:
hears bellman's cry, 1/19;
notes mistakes in entries, 1/92–3, 94, 207; 9/349, 353, 357, 363, 515;
notes striking of clock, 2/14;
receives funeral invitation, 2/73;
makes entry for future reference, 3/3–4;
writes 'slubberingly' in poor light, 3/236 & n.c; writes shakily because shocked, 8/208 & n.a; consults it, 4/296;
makes entries for his justification, 7/331, 331–2; 8/548–9;
values it, 8/264;
confesses to tiredness, 6/16; 7/74
incidents and phrases [i.e. Some memorable passages which are difficult or impossible to retrieve by the use of the rest of the Index]:
childhood: 'But Lord, how in every point I find myself to over-value things when a child', 5/132
church: 'And when the parson begins, he begins "Right Worshipfull and dearly beloved" to us', 2/147
death: 'all die alike, no more matter being made of the death of one then another', 4/339;
'but Lord, to see how the world makes nothing of the memory of a man an hour after he is dead', 5/91;
'This day Sir W. Batten, who hath been sick four or five days, is now very bad, so as that people begin to fear his death — and I at a loss whether it will be better for me to have him die, because he is a bad man, or live, for fear a worse should come', 6/32;
'Sir Wm. Petty came, among other things, to tell me that Mr. Barlow is dead; for which, God knows my heart, I could be as sorry as is possible for one to be for a stranger by whose death he gets 100l per annum', 6/33;
'[Sir W. Batten] is so ill, that it is believed he cannot live till tomorrow; which troubles me and my wife mightily, partly out of kindness, he being a good neighbour, and partly because of the money he owes me upon our bargain of the late prize', 8/462;
'And here do see what creatures widows are in weeping for their husbands, and then presently leaving off; but I cannot wonder at it, the cares of the world taking place of all other passions', 8/483
food: 'And strange it is, to see how a good dinner and feasting reconciles everybody', 6/295
london life and manners: 'I sat up till the bell-man came by with his bell, just under my window as I was writing of this very line, and cried, "Past one of the clock, and a cold, frosty, windy morning." I then went to bed and left my wife and the maid a-washing still', 1/19;
'And here, I sitting behind in a dark place, a lady spat backward upon me by a mistake, not seeing me. But after seeing her to be a very pretty lady, I was not troubled at it at all', 2/25;
'But Lord, to see the absurd nature of Englishmen, that cannot forbear laughing and jeering at everything that looks strange', 3/268;
'But it is very pleasant to hear how [Will Stankes of Brampton] rails at the rumbling and ado that is in London over it is in the country, that he cannot endure it', 4/118;
'it being very pleasant to see how everybody [on Epsom Downs] turns up his tail, here one and there another, in a bush, and the women in their Quarters the like', 4/246;
'I went out, and running up (her friend however before me) I perceive by my dear Lady's blushing that in my dining-room she was doing something upon the pott; which I also was ashamed of and so fell to some discourse, but without pleasure, through very pity to my Lady', 5/129;
'I lacked a pot but there was none, and bitter cold, so was forced to rise and piss in the chimny, and to bed again', 5/357
love affairs: 'When weary, I did give over, and somebody having seen some of our dalliance, called aloud in the street, "Sir, why do you kiss the gentlewoman so?" and flung a stone at the window — which vexed me', 4/203;
'a strange slavery that I stand in to beauty, that I value nothing near it', 5/264;
'Up, and to the office (having a mighty pain in my fore-pg 84finger of my left hand, from a strain that it received last night in struggling avec la femme que je mentioned yesterday)', 6/40;
'I am not, as I ought to be, able to command myself in the pleasures of my eye', 7/110;
'into St Dunstan's church. . . . And stood by a pretty, modest maid, whom I did labour to take by the hand and the body; but she would not, but got further and further from me, and at last I could perceive her to take pins out of her pocket to prick me if I should touch her again; which seeing, I did forbear, and was glad I did espy her design', 8/389
marriage: 'myself somewhat vexed at my wife's neglect in leaving of her scarfe, waistcoat, and night-dressings in the coach today that brought us from Westminster, though I confess she did give them to me to look after — yet it was her fault not to see that I did take them out of the coach', 4/6;
'Coming home tonight, I did go to examine my wife's house-accounts; and finding things that seemed somewhat doubtful, I was angry, though she did make it pretty plain; but confessed that when she doth misse a sum, she doth add something to other things to make it', 5/283;
'To church in the morning, and there saw a wedding in the church, which I have not seen many a day, and the young people so merry one with another; and strange, to see what delight we married people have to see these poor fools decoyed into our condition, every man and wife gazing and smiling at them', 6/338–9;
'high words between us. But I fell to read a book (Boyle's Hydrostatickes) aloud in my chamber and let her talk till she was tired, and vexed that I would not hear her; and so become friends and to bed together', 8/250–1
money: 'talking long in bed with my wife about our frugall life for the time to come, proposing to her what I could and would do if I were worth 2000l; that is, be a Knight and keep my coach — which pleased her', 3/39–40;
'it is high time to betake myself to my . . . vows, . . . so I may for a great while do my duty, as I have well begun, and encrease my good name and esteem in the world and get money, which sweetens all things and whereof I have much need', 4/6–7;
'And I bless God, I do find that I am worth more than ever I yet was, which is 6200l — for which the holy name of God be praised', 7/348–9; 'but it is pretty to see what money will do', 8/123
music: 'However, music and women I cannot but give way to, whatever my business is', 7/69–70;
'music is the thing of the world that I love most, and all the pleasure almost that I can now take', 7/228;
'but that which did please me beyond anything in the whole world was the wind-musique when the Angell comes down, which is so sweet that it ravished me; and endeed, in a word, did wrap up my soul so that it made me really sick, just as I have formerly been when in love with my wife; that neither then, nor all the evening going home and at home, I was able to think of anything, but remained all night transported, so as I could not believe that ever any music hath that real command over the soul of a man as this did upon me', 9/94
pleasure: 'I do think it best to enjoy some degree of pleasure, now that we have health, money and opportunities, rather then to leave pleasures to old age or poverty, when we cannot have them so properly' 3/86;
'I. . . do look upon myself at this time in the happiest occasion a man can be; and whereas we take pains in expectation of future comfort and ease, I have taught myself to reflect upon myself at present as happy and enjoy myself in that consideration, and not only please myself with thoughts of future wealth, and forget the pleasures we at present enjoy', 7/57;
'We eat with great pleasure, and I enjoyed myself in it with reflections upon the pleasures which I pg 85at best can expect, yet not to exceed this — eating in silver plates, and all things mighty rich and handsome about me', 7/388;
'they being gone, I paid the fiddler 3l among the four, and so away to bed, weary and mightily pleased; and have the happiness to reflect upon it as I do sometimes on other things, as going to a play or the like, to be the greatest real comforts that I am to expect in the world, and that it is that that we do really labour in the hopes of; and so I do really enjoy myself, and understand that if I do not do it now, I shall not hereafter, it may be, be able to pay for it or have health to take pleasure in it, and so fool myself with vain expectation of pleasure and go without it', 9/13;
'I did, as I love to do, enjoy myself in my pleasure, as being the heighth of what we take pains for and can hope for in this world — and therefore to be enjoyed while we are young and capable of these joys', 9/134
public affairs: 'But methought it lessened my esteem of a king, that he should not be able to command the rain', 3/140;
'I see it is impossible for the King to have things done as cheap as other men', 3/143; 'He showed me a very excellent argument to prove that our Importing lesse then we export doth not impoverish the kingdom, according to the received opinion — which though it be a paradox and that I do not remember the argument, yet methought there was a great deal in what he said', 5/70;
'While we were talking, came by several poor creatures, carried by by constables for being at a conventicle. They go like lambs, without any resistance. I would to God they would either conform, or be more wise and not be ketched', 5/235;
'[He] did . . . inform me mightily in several things; among others, that the heightening or lowering of money is only a cheat, and doth good to some perticular men; which, if I can but remember how, I am now by him fully convinced of', 7/304;
'by bringing over one discontented man you raise up three in his room', 7/311;
'Most things moved were referred to committees — and so we broke up', 7/321;
'Englishmen on board the Dutch ships . . . did cry and say, "We did heretofore fight for tickets; now we fight for Dollers!"', 8/267;
'some rude people have been . . . at my Lord Chancellor's, . . . and a Gibbet either set up before or painted upon his gate, and these words writ — "Three sights to be seen; Dunkirke, Tanger, and a barren Queen'", 8/269;
'But it was pretty, news came the other day so fast, of the Duch fleets being in so many places, that Sir W. Batten at table cried, "By God!" says he, "I think the Devil shits Dutchmen'", 8/345;
'[Coling] told us his horse was a Bribe, and his boots a bribe; . . . and that he makes every sort of tradesman to bribe him; and invited me home to his house to taste of his bribe wine', 8/369
servants: 'To the office, where. . . I sent my boy home for some papers; where, he staying longer then I would have him and being vexed at the business and to be kept from my fellows in the office longer then was fit, I became angry and boxed my boy when he came, that I do hurt my Thumb so much, that I was not able to stir all the day after and in great pain', 7/19;
'coming homeward again, saw my door and hatch open, left so by Luce our cookmaid; which so vexed me, that I did give her a kick in our entry and offered a blow at her, and was seen doing so by Sir W. Penn's footboy, which did vex me to the heart because I know he will be telling their family of it, though I did put on presently a very pleasant face to the boy and spoke kindly to him as one without passion, so as it may be he might not think I was angry; but yet I was troubled at it', 8/164
social occasions: 'Went to hear Mrs. Turner's daughter . . . play on the Harpsicon; but Lord! it was enough to make any man sick to hear her; yet was I forced to commend her pg 86highly', 4/120;
'They have a kinswoman they call daughter in the house, a short, ugly, red-haired slut that plays upon the virginalls and sings, but after such a country manner, I was weary of it, but yet could not but commend it', 4/242;
'We were as merry as I could be with people that I do wish well to but know not what discourse either to give them or find from them', 4/427;
'A very good dinner among the old Sokers', 6/36
success:'There was also [a letter] for me from Mr. Blackburne, who with his own hand superscribes it to S.P. Esqr., of which, God knows, I was not a little proud', 1/96–7;
'Lay very long in bed, discoursing with Mr Hill of most things of a man's life, and how little merit doth prevail in the world, but only favour — and that for myself, chance without merit brought me in, and that diligence only keeps me so', 6/285;
'We had much talk of all our old acquaintance of the College, concerning their various fortunes; wherein, to my joy, I met not with any that have sped better then myself', 8/51;
'my Lord Chancellor did say . . . that no man in England was of more method nor made himself better understood then myself', 8/60
theatre: 'Burt acted the Moore; by the same token, a very pretty lady that sot by me cried to see Desdimona smothered', 1/264;
'I sitting behind in a dark place, a lady spat backward upon me by a mistake, not seeing me. But after seeing her to be a very pretty lady, I was not troubled at it at all', 2/25;
'And it was observable how a gentleman of good habitt, sitting just before us eating of some fruit, in the midst of the play did drop down as dead; but with much ado, Orange Mall did thrust her finger down his throat and brought him to life again', 8/516–17;
'It pleased us mightily to see the natural affection of a poor woman, the mother of one of the children brought on the stage — the child crying, she by force got upon the stage, and took up her child and carried it away off of the stage from Hart', 8/594;
'I was prettily served this day at the playhouse-door; where giving six shillings into the fellow's hand for us three, the fellow by legerdemain did convey one away, and with so much grace face me down that I did give him but five, that though I knew the contrary, yet I was overpowered by his so grave and serious demanding the other shilling that I could not deny him, but was forced by myself to give it him', 9/90
work: 'having so many [letters] to write . . . that I have no heart to go about them', 1/215;
'here I had a most eminent experience of the evil of being behind-hand in business; I was the most backward to begin anything, and would fain have framed to myself an occasion of going abroad . . . but some business coming in . . . kept me there, and I fell to the ridding away of a great deal of business . . . and . . . I could have continued there with delight all night long', 7/249
workmen: 'At home all the afternoon looking after my workmen in my house, whose lazinesse doth much trouble me', 1/243;
'All the afternoon at home among my workmen; work till 10 or 11 at night; and did give them drink and were very merry with them — it being my luck to meet with a sort of Drolling workmen upon all occasions', 1/255;
'a poor fellow, a working goldsmith, that goes without gloves to his hands', 8/437
misc.: 'Lay long; that is, till 6 and past before I rose', 3/190;
'so home to dinner, where I find my wife hath been with Ashwell at La Roches to have her tooth drawn, which it seems akes much. But my wife could not get her to be contented to have it drawn after the first twitch, but would let it alone; and so they came home with it undone, which made my wife and me good sport', 4/97;
'By and by news is brought us that one of our pg 87horses is stole out of the Stable; which proves my uncles, at which I was inwardly glad; I mean, that it was not mine', 4/310;
'the fellow coming out again of a shop, I did give him a good cuff or two on the chops; and seeing him not oppose me, I did give him another; at last, found him drunk, of which I was glad and so left him and home', 4/342;
'it is not greatest wits but the steady man that is a good merchant', 5/300;
'where a Trade hath once been and doth decay, it never recovers again', ib.; 'one Mr Tripp, who dances well', 7/362;
'He told me also a story of my Lord Cottington: who wanting a son, entended to make his Nephew his heir, a country boy, but did alter his mind upon the boy's being persuaded by another young heir (in roguery) to Crow like a cock at my Lord's table, much company being there and the boy having a great trick at doing that perfectly — my Lord bade them take away that fool from the table, and so gave over the thoughts of making him his heir from this piece of folly', 8/566–7
DICK (Dike) SHORE:
DICKENSON, Esther ('Widow'):
DICKONS (Dekins), [John], hemp merchant:
dies of grief, 3/213, 233;
social: 3/19
DICKONS, [Elizabeth], ('my Morena'):
at St Olave's, 2/192;
illness and death, 3/213, 233;
alluded to: 3/19
DIGBY, Lady Anne, daughter of the 2nd Earl of Bristol:
DIGBY, Capt. [Francis], naval officer, son of the 2nd Earl of Bristol:
opinion of 'tarpaulins', 7/333
DIGBY, George, 2nd Earl of Bristol, succ. 1653 [occasionally referred to by his original title of Lord Digby], politician:
a Papist, 4/224; 9/17;
said to have turned Protestant, 5/58; 9/120;
a public danger, 9/120;
responsible for failure of Treaty of Uxbridge (1645), 4/212 & n. 1;
sells Irish peerage (1646), 8/126;
in France and Flanders during Interregnum, 4/212–13 & nn.;
enmity to Clarendon: 2/142;
opposes over bill of uniformity, 3/49 & n. 1;
brings articles of impeachment against (1663) 4/115, 219–20, 223–5 & nn., 229, 231 & n. 2, 367; 8/445 & n. 4;
renews attack (1664), 5/34, 60 & n. 4, 73, 85, 89, 137, 208;
influence over King, 4/137;
Part in scheme for parliamentary management, 4/200, 207, 207–8 & nn., 211 & nn., 213;
supports marriage alliance with Parma, 4/224 & n. 1;
flees to escape arrest, 4/271 & n. 1, 272, 298 & n. 4; 5/85, 89 & n. 3;
Lady Denman supports him, 7/405;
his faction, 7/261;
appears in Lords, 8/362;
recovers King's favour, 8/530, 532, 533, 597;
~ his chaplain, 5/58–9 & n.
DIKE: see Dyke
[DILLENTGHAM, Theophilus], Master of Clare Hall and Vice-Chancellor, Cambridge: 3/218 & n. 4
DILLON, Col. Cary, succ. as 5th Earl of Roscommon 1685:
courtship of Frances Butler, 1/209 & n. 3, 217; 2/152; 3/299 & n. 1; 9/311;
alluded to: 1/214
DILLON, [William]:
hanged, 4/60 & n. 1
DIPLOMATS [for individuals, see under personal names]:
disputes about precedence among in London, 2/187–9 & nn.;
in Paris, 4/419–20 & n.; (rumour of) in Madrid, 8/36 & n. 2
DIVES:
see Dyve
DIXON, Mr[D]: matchmaker for
Tom P, 4/19, 21
DIXWELL, Col. [Basil], cr. bt 1660, of Broome, Barham, Kent (d. 1668): 1/172, 176, 182
DOBBINS, Capt. [Joseph]:
feast as Elder Brother, Trinity House, 6/155
DOCTORS' COMMONS, St Benet's Hill:
P visits, 1/229; 2/216; 4/368; 5/351
DOLBEN, Catherine, wife of John:
story of, 9/89 & n. 5;
~ her two children, 9/89
DOLBEN, John, Dean of Westminster 1662–83, Bishop of Rochester 1666–83, pg 88Archbishop of York 1683—d.86:
sermon before King, 7/245 & n. 4;
rumoured suspension, 8/587 & n. 2;
slanders against, 8/596 & n. 2;
dismissed from court office, 9/53 & n. 2, 89
DOLING, Thomas, messenger, Council of State:
news from, 1/14 & n. 4;
P's letters to, 1/116, 126 & n. 2;
to go to Ireland, 1/311;
visits Overton in prison, 1/319;
social: 1/37, 38, 80, 92, 95, 174–5, 208, 230, 282
DOLL, milliner at the New Exchange:
see Stacey
DOMESDAY BOOK:
P to consult, 2/236 & n. 3
DONCASTER, [D], waterman: 3/156
DONNE:
see Dunn
DONNE, John, poet (1573–1631):
takes holy orders, 9/215 & n. 2
DORCHESTER, Lord:
DORMEHOY:
DORMER, Charles, 2nd Earl of Caernarvon (1632–1709):
on value of timber, 8/201 & n. 3
DORRINGTON, [?Francis, ?John], merchant:
compensation for loss of ship, 9/69 & n. 1;
bid for victualling contract, 9/288 & n. 2
DORSET, Earl of:
DORSET HOUSE, Salisbury Court:
Clarendon at, 1/173, 184
DOUCE:
see Doves
DOUGLAS, James, 2nd Marquess of Douglas (d. 1700):
at court ball, 7/372;
commands troops, 8/306, 308, 309, 311
DOUGLAS, William, 9th Earl of Morton (d. 1681): 9/534 & n. 2
DOVER, Kent:
parliamentary elections, 1/96–7, 111(2), 167, 179 & n. 1, 183;
clerk of castle, 1/97;
jurats visit Naseby, 1/130;
mayor welcomes King, 1/158;
Dutch ships brought into, 5/326;
Rupert's fleet at, 7/143–5 passim; Governor prepares against invasion, 7/187 & n. 1;
squadron to be stationed at, 8/149 & n. 1;
Dutch attack feared, 8/327 & n. 1, 328;
Duke of York as Lord Warden, 9/280 & n. 4;
also, 1/134, 279; 7/300
DOVES (?Douce, ?Dowes), Capt.[D]: 2/207
DOWGATE [see also Taverns etc.: Swan]: Fire, 7/270
DOWNE(S), [Elkanah], Vicar of Ashtead, Surrey, 1662—d.83:
dull sermon, 4/247 & n. 1
[DOWNES, John], actor and writer:
in Davenant's Siege of Rhodes, 2/131 & n. 3
DOWNES, [John], regicide:
reprieved 3/16 & n. 1
DOWNING, [Frances], b. Howard, wife of Sir George:
praises Holland, 1/249;
alluded to: 1/153
DOWNING, George, kted 1660, cr. bt 1663; Teller of the Receipt in the Exchequer 1656–60; reappointed 1660; envoy to United Provinces, 1657–60, 1660–7, 1671–2; Secretary to the Treasury Commissioners, 1667–71; M.P. Morpeth, 1660, 1661–79, 1679, 1679–81, 1681
character:
parsimonious, 1/186 & n. 2; 8/85;
rogue, 3/45;
vain, 8/425;
efficient, 8/238, 240
as envoy to united provinces:
offers P clerkship, 1/18, 31;
P writes ciphers for, 1/28, 30, 31;
leaves for Holland, 1/23, 25, 29, 31, 33;
returns, 1/136 & n. 1, 249;
knighted, 1/153;
has regicides extradited, 3/44–5 & n., 48;
protests against Dutch detaining English cargo, 5/321;
assists in relief of English prisoners of war, 7/201 & n. 1, 380 & n. 3; 8/407–8 & n., 425;
complains of peace terms, 8/425–7 & nn.;
intelligence service, 9/401–2 & nn.
in exchequer:
as P's master, 1/2 & n. 1, 83, 107–8, 238;
offers P council clerkship, 1/22 & n. 5, 35;
lawsuit against Squibb, 1/31 & n. 1, 33–6 passim, 40, 45, 48, 49;
encourages loans on Additional Aid (1665), 6/322, 327, 330, 334; 7/9, 23, 87, 124 & n. 2; 8/131–2, 397–8, 407
as m.p.:
part in drafting Additional Aid bill (1665), 6/292 & n. 3; 7/122; 8/30;
project for leather trade, 8/425 & n. 4;
introduces bill for Treasury orders, 8/520 & n.2;
parliamentary news from, 7/380; 8/520
at treasury:
appointed secretary, 8/238, 240;
Tangier accounts, 8/249
pg 89social:
Christmas dinner for poor neighbours, 8/85 & n. 1;
also, 7/215, 216
alluded to:
as chairman of Council of Trade, 2/20;
also, 1/10, 67
~ his child, 1/249;
his mother [Lucy], 8/85
DOWNING, [John], anchor-smith:
P returns douceur, 7/119, 138
DOWNING, Capt. [?John], soldier:
gives evidence to Committee on Miscarriages, 8/538 & n. 3;
social: 7/362, 363
DOWNS, the, off Kent [entries concerning use of roadstead by English warships are not indexed]:
Batten's trip to, 4/296;
Dutch fleet in, 6/258;
Smyrna fleet, 7/404
DOYLY, Sir William, M.P. Great Yarmouth, Norf., 1660, 1661–77:
parliamentary commissioner for paying off fleet, 1/255, 286 & n. 2;
Commissioner for Sick and Wounded 6/217 & n. 4; 8/407;
warrant for bucks, 6/220–1 & n.; 8/248;
social: 6/218; 8/224
[DRAGHI, Giovanni Battista] (Seignor Baptista; Seignor Joanni), musician:
compositions, 7/352 & n. 4; 8/54–5 & n.;
feat of musical memory, 8/55–7 passim; ?his singing, 9/322 & n. 2
DRAKE, Mr[D], of Hackney:
house and garden, 7/181 & n. 3
DRAMMEN (Dram), Norway:
timber from, 3/118 & n. 3
DRAWWATER, Dorothy: 8/468 & n. 2
DRAWWATER, [James]:
at P's Twelfth Night party, 1/10 ~ his wife [Jane], b. Strudwick, ib.
DRAYDON:
see Dryden
DREAMS (P):
bedwetting, 1/162;
EP's death, 1/285;
accident to EP, 2/226;
swollen testicle, ib.; plots, 3/250;
W. Swan the fanatic, ib.; lawsuit, 4/15;
St John's Isle, 4/43;
J. Cole, 6/145;
Lady Castlemaine, 6/191;
fire, 7/287, 296, 299; ?8/87, 128;
death of mother, 8/129, 303;
defending Navy Board in Parliament, 9/88;
reflects on nature of, 6/191;
EP suspects him of dreaming of Deb Willet, 9/384, 439
DREBBEL pribble), [Cornelis] van:
his mine, 3/46 & n. 1; 4/378
DRESS AND PERSONAL APPEARANCE (MEN AND BOYS) [see also Prices; Watches etc.]:
general (P):
importance of good linen, 3/216, 228; 8/121;
and neatness, 2/199 & n. 1;
to dress fashionably, 4/343, 357; 5/269, 302; 6/100;
concerned at expense, 2/47, 129; 4/356, 357; 6/104;
concerned not to over-dress, 9/551
garments and accessories:
aprons: worn by apprentice weavers, 5/222
bands: King's lack of, 8/417;
lace/fine bands, 3/215, 219–20, 228, 236; 6/100, 128; 9/6;
in plain band mistaken for servant, 8/115;
band strings, 2/80
belts (P): sword belt, 4/80; 7/26, 353; 8/83, 321–2; 9/201, 537
boots (P):
riding-boots, 1/279; 2/132; 3/204, 217; 4/28
breeches:
two legs through one knee of, 2/66 & n. 2;
(P): baize linings, 1/268;
close-knee'd, 3/106;
white linings, 4/130;
rabbit skin prevents galling, 5/298;
silk, 6/218;
camlet, 9/533
cannons (tops) (P): 1/156;
black silk, 4/357, 400
caps: ,
montero, 1/120;
toilet, 1/239;
Venetian, 1/324;
fur, 8/22;
(P): fur, 1/31;
EP makes, 1/85;
velvet studying, 1/120;
velvet montero, 1/227, 232; 7/346;
nightcap, 6/175
chemise (P): 8/158
clerical: 3/224;
surplices, 3/215;
cassock, 7/299 & n. 3, 310, 313;
catholic priest in lay clothes, 7/329 & n. 3;
hair shirt and sandals, 8/26; 'plain country parson dress', 8/118
cloaks:
silk, 1/14;
velvet-lined, 5/241;
Colchester bays at Spanish court, 8/79;
(P): camlet, 1/190; 7/7, 15; 8/525, 580–1, 599–600;
velvet, 3/84;
velvet-lined, 4/343, 344, 353, 357, 400; 5/125;
lined with moiré, 5/142, 144;
with plush, 5/302, 308, 309;
cloak-coat, 7/106; pg 90'common riding-cloak', 7/208;
cloak made into suit, 1/118; 8/314;
to be worn if without sword, 3/241 & n. 2
coats:
children's, 1/250;
Duke of York's buffcoat, 6/51;
(P): jackanapes, 1/193;
velvet, 1/194, 221, 227, 232; 2/81, 100, 231; 7/7, 15, 25;
camlet, 1/198; 4/112;
camlet riding-coat, 3/42, 85;
short black made from cloak, 1/251;
trimmed from EP's petticoats, 2/120; 5/44;
short, 5/240;
as part of suit, 6/175; 7/353
codpieces: 8/421, 596
collars: see scallops
comb-case: 1/239
cravats: 2/229;
(P): 1/95; 7/25
cuffs (hands) (P): 8/412, 440;
doublets (P): 3/181;
slashed, 3/116
drawers:
holland, 5/222;
(P): 7/280
facings (P): 2/120
frock: 3/116
garters (P): 4/131
gloves:
working goldsmith without, 8/437;
(P): buckskin, 1/166;
kid leather, ib.
gowns (P):
Indian, 2/130; 7/85; 8/462;
morning, 3/77, 82;
shag, 4/357, 360;
dressing gown, 8/522
habit, riding (P): 3/288
hands: see cuffs
handkerchieves ('han(d)kaychers'):
as neckcloth, 7/269;
King's lack of, 8/417;
(P): (with strawberry buttons), 1/94
hats:
beaver, 2/80;
plumed, 1/142; 2/172, 229;
cocked, 8/249;
(P): montero, 1/92, 227;
beaver, 2/127, 203; 3/67, 71; 4/360;
low-crowned beaver, 4/274, 280;
velvet riding hat, 4/360;
hatbands, 1/94, 247;
wearing of: at meals, 5/277 & n. 3;
during toasts, 7/246;
by puritan preachers, 3/207 & n. 3;
as mark of respect etc., 2/19 & n. 1; 4/114; 5/205; 6/14 & n. 2, 339; 8/319 & n. 2
jewelry:
ring with Woolwich stone, 8/84 & n. 2;
(P): Portuguese rings, 3/139
lace: see Textiles etc.
linings: see breeches
livery:
Sandwich's servants, 2/79;
Penn's and Batten's, 3/77;
others', 8/115, 186;
(P): servants', 3/47, 50 & n. 3, 77; 9/372, 378
mittens:
fur, 8/22
monteros: see hats
muff (P): 3/271
neckcloth (P): 6/175; 8/486
nightgowns (dressing gowns): 6/228; 7/378; 9/4;
silk, 3/242;
(P): 6/175; 7/268, 272
pantaloons: 5/255 & n. 1
powder (for head) (P): 3/96
ribbons [see also Marriage: wedding ceremonies]:
green for birthday, 6/285;
black for leg (new fashion), 7/324;
(P): 9/165, 230
sash (p): 8/462
scallops (collars): (P): 3/216, 220, 235
shirts (P):
wears two, 7/291
half-shirts, 1/231; 2/195; 4/360; 5/191
shoes:
shepherd's iron-shod, 8/339;
(P) [see also Wootton, W.]: first wears buckles, 1/26;
'in shoemaker's stocks', 7/107 & n. 2;
shoe strings, 9/188
sleeves:
butchers', 5/222;
(P): laced, 6/125; 9/201
socks: (P): 8/105
stockings:
shepherd's woollen, 8/339;
(P): knitted, 1/85;
grey serge, 1/94;
linen, 1/156;
short black, 1/251;
thread, 2/138; 6/334; 8/105;
woollen, 2/138;
cotton, 6/73;
leather, 6/309
suits:
Sandwich's coronation, 2/83;
his gold-buttoned, 4/187;
Duke of York's riding, 2/213;
silk, 5/24;
(P): bombazine, 7/172, 182; 9/215, 217;
camlet, 6/104, 106, 114, 125, 152; 8/295, 314, 315; 9/533, 534, 537, 540, 548;
cloth: grey riding, 2/120; 3/42, 85, 106, 116; 4/243;
moiré lined, 5/142, 144;
farandine, 6/124, 125, 175, 210;
silk, 3/190, 196; 2/105;
stuff, 6/127–8; 9/197, 201, 210, 540;
misc.: with great skirts, 1/3, 38;
skirts shortened, 1/121;
white, with silver lace coat, 1/38;
made from cloak, 1/118;
old black new-furbished, 3/54;
close-kneed coloured suit, 4/105;
new pg 91fashion (vest, coat, belt, sword), 7/353;
changes in September from silk to cloth suit, 8/455
swords:
Prynne's basket-hilt, 1/62;
(P): rapier stick, 1/95, 138;
sword 'refreshed', 2/24;
smallsword with gilt handle, 4/80, 105;
silver-hilted, 7/353;
gilded for May Day, 9/537;
wears to escort Sandwich, 1/93;
starts wearing 'as manner among gentlemen is', 2/29 & n. 2; 3/241 & n. 2;
equips footboy with, 3/77 & n. 2; 9/537
tops: see cannons
travelling-clothes: 8/233
tunics:
(P): velvet, 8/489;
laced, 9/201 & n. 2;
coloured camlet, 9/540
turbans: 7/378;
worn by giant, 5/243
veils:
at synagogue, 4/335 & n. 2
vests:
new fashion, 7/315;
first worn by Duke of York, 7/320;
description, 7/324, 328;
Louis XIV puts footmen into, 7/379 & n. 4;
also, 8/154;
(P): first wears, 7/346, 353(2), 362, 366;
made from old suit, 8/295, 314, 341, 404;
his new laced vest, 9/201;
and flowered tabby, 9/533, 540
waistcoats (P) (outer garments):
green watered moiré, 1/298;
false tabby with gold lace, 2/195;
black baize faced with silk, 4/360;
thin silk, 7/172; (under garments): leaves off/puts on according to season, 2/116, 195, 198; 3/138; 5/198; 6/67; 7/182; 8/235; 9/175, 180, 400, 549
walking sticks (canes) (P):
knotted, 1/104;
rattan, painted and gilded, 1/244;
buys at cane shop, 5/117;
varnished for walking, 7/211;
silver-headed Japan, 8/84
complete outfits (P): 4/105, 400; 6/175; 9/201, 533
fashion:
changes at Easter, 8/63;
King's new, 7/315, 320–1;
description, 7/324 & n. 3, 328;
worn by M.P.s, 7/324;
hat 'cocked behind', 8/249;
French ambassador's unfashionable dress, 9/284 & n. 3;
(P): buys/wears to keep up with: buckled shoes, 1/26 & n. 2;
short cloak, 1/260;
coat and sword, 2/29;
longer hair, 2/97;
new coat, 2/203;
suit with linings showing under breeches, 4/130;
low-crowned beaver, 4/280;
suits in new fashion, 7/353(2); 8/295;
suit with shoulder belt for sword, 9/201
court/ceremonial/professional [see also clerical, above]:
coronation robes, 2/80, 82, 84;
regalia, 2/84;
costumes at court ball, 7/372 & n. 3;
Russian envoys' costumes, 3/297; 8/428;
Persian envoy's, 9/17;
Garter robes, 8/184–5;
academic, 9/544
mourning:
purple worn by King, 1/246;
(P): hat band, 1/247;
short black stockings, 1/251(2);
belt, 2/203;
shoes blacked, 5/90;
white gloves, 5/90 & n. 2;
servants', 8/134
beards:
Spanish fashion, 8/453 & n. 1;
(P): shaves off beard/moustache, 3/97; 5/22–3 & n.
hairdressing:
wigs worn at court, 4/136;
King and Duke of York start wearing, 4/360; 5/49, 126;
and W. Howe, 4/390;
Rupert's, 8/146;
(P): hair cut by: barber, 2/97; 4/237; 5/352;
EP, 5/72; 8/35; 9/424;
maids, 8/280; 9/201;
and sister-in-law, 9/175;
close-cropped, 7/112, 302;
because lousy, 9/424;
foul with powder, 3/96;
combed by maids, 3/96; 6/21, 185; 8/531; 9/20, 37, 48, 73, 109, 277, 328, 337;
head inspected, 9/239;
finds difficulty in keeping hair clean, 3/96, 196; 4/130;
to wear periwig, 4/130, 290, 343, 350, 357, 358, 378;
first appearances in, 4/362, 363, 365, 369;
periwig cleaned, 5/212;
repaired, 6/74;
fears to wear one made during Plague, 6/210;
refuses to buy infested periwig, 8/133, 146;
buys from French wigmaker, 8/136, 137, 138, 146, 177; 9/334;
barber to keep in repair, 9/217;
catches fire in candle, 9/322;
periwig case, 4/363;
also, 6/89, 97
shaving (P):
trimmed by barber, 1/90, 113, 136, 142, 148, 152, 162, 200, 208, 214, 219, 224, 252, 298, 308; 2/32, 76, 97, 112, 135, 180, 241; 3/24, 41, 64, 71, 81, 187, 201, 215, 220, 233, 289, 299; 4/16, 20, 23, 43, 96, 130, 154, 186, 190, 258, 261, 312; 5/246; 6/257, 266, 288, 303, 306, 322, 331, 334; 7/6, 278, pg 92293; 9/234, 496;
employs barber on giving up pumice-stone, 3/196;
for first time for a year, 6/233;
pays barber, 9/225;
shaves with pumice, 3/91, 97;
shaves off beard/moustache, 3/97;
begins using razor, 5/6;
shaves off beard/moustache, 5/22–3 & n.;
cuts himself, 5/29;
shaves after week's growth during Fire, 7/288;
shaves himself, 5/52, 55, 87; 6/159, 228, 311; 8/247
washing (P):
washes regularly, 5/320;
washes on hottest day of year, 3/75;
and at EP's request, 6/44;
washes feet/legs, 3/47; 4/165; 7/172, 206;
catches cold, 7/207;
ears washed, 6/21;
lousy, 9/424
DRESS AND PERSONAL APPEARANCE (WOMEN AND GIRLS):
garments and accessories:
aprons:
Queen Catherine, 9/557
bands:
lace, 6/172
bodice:
Nell Gwyn, 8/193;
(EP): pair, 4/357
caps:
Duchess of Newcastle's velvet, 8/186, 196
coats (EP):
velvet, 4/316
cuffs (EP):
laced, 8/392–3, 396
drawers: 9/194;
dress:
lying-in, 6/55; 7/329;
'pay-san', 8/375;
riding, 6/162; 7/162;
travelling, 7/142
dressing-box: 8/46, 53;
(EP): 9/91
fans (EP): 4/172
farthingales:
Portuguese ladies-in-waiting, 3/92 & n. 2
galloshes; 6/299
garters:
valentine gift, 9/449;
(EP): valentine gift, 2/40
gloves:
embroidered, 2/38;
white, 2/38; 4/68; 7/344;
Jessamy, 7/344; 9/449;
(EP): valentine gift, 2/40;
painted leather, 4/100;
with yellow ribbons, 5/264;
perfumed French, 9/427
gorget: 4/279
gowns:
velvet, 3/299; 4/2, 400;
silver-laced, 5/188;
flowered tabby, 9/521;
(EP): black silk, laced with black gimp, 2/117;
moiré to replace taffeta, 3/298; 4/10, 13;
trimmed with point, 4/337;
Indian, 4/391; 5/8;
Japanese, 4/415;
laced, 5/100, 110, 118; 9/455–6;
morning, 5/103; 8/465, 468;
light coloured silk, 6/76;
similar to Lady Castlemaine's, 7/298;
coloured flowered tabby, 7/302; 9/540;
cloth, 8/242
handkerchieves ('han(d)kirchers'):
('lace', worn as collar), 7/341; 8/576;
(EP): 2/211, 212, 214; 7/243, 379; 9/6
hats:
plumed, 4/230;
straw, 8/382;
(EP): straw, 8/382
hoods:
black, 1/42;
(EP): yellow bird's-eye, 6/102 & n. 2;
white, 8/124;
French, 9/453
jewelry:
posy ring, 1/39;
diamonds and pearls at court ball, 7/371–2;
(EP): pearl necklace, 1/240; 6/200–1; 7/108, 111, 112, 113, 412;
pendants, 4/100; 5/196;
diamond ring, 6/190–1; 9/67–8, 78, 88–9
juste-au-corps:
black, 8/187;
gold laced, 9/213
lace: see Textiles etc.; when worn as collar, see above, handkerchieves
mantle:
frieze, 1/60–1;
white flannel, 8/79;
(EP): 1/320
mask [see also below, vizard]:
at theatre, 8/71–2;
at Vauxhall, 9/220;
travelling 2/91 & n. 1;
(EP): 5/28
muff (EP): 1/320; 3/271; 4/7; 7/39
neckcloth: 8/224
nightgown:
Lady Castlemaine's, 8/404;
(EP): 7/18; 8/210, 424, 458
patches:
worn by Dutch ladies, 1/138;
shop girl, 3/239 & n. 2;
Duchess of Newcastle, 8/186;
Peg Lowther, 6/9; 8/196, 197;
Lady Castlemaine, 9/186;
Lady Sandwich and daughter, 1/269;
(EP): first wears, 1/234, 283, 299
pattens (EP): 1/27
petticoats:
satin, 3/83;
linen, trimmed with lace (Lady Castlemaine), 3/87;
short crimson (Queen Catherine), 4/229;
(EP): paragon, 1/82;
trimmed with silver lace, 1/225; 5/239; 8/242;
and gold lace, 5/44;
sarcenet, trimmed with black lace, 3/65;
yellow, 3/85; 5/264;
green flowered satin trimmed with gimp lace, 3/125;
silk striped, 4/199;
silk, 5/114; 7/296;
blue, 8/124;
laced, 9/400
pinner:
(Lady Castlemaine), 5/126;
pg 93white (Queen Catherine), 9/557;
(EP): 7/243;
point-de-Gesne, 8/413 & n. 2
ribbons:
on hat, 6/172;
(EP): 2/235;
on gloves, 5/264
sack (sac) gown (EP):
brought from France, 9/464
scallop (EP): 2/228
scarf (EP): 4/6;
laced, 5/274
shoes:
white, 6/299;
shoe-strings as valentine present, 9/449;
(EP): brought from France, 9/453
sleeves:
hanging sleeves, 4/254; 9/507;
smock sleeves, 8/193
smocks: 3/87; 8/404;
(EP): linen, 1/88
stockings:
valentine gifts: silk, 7/70;
green silk, 9/449 & n. 1;
(EP): valentine gift, 2/40
suits:
lustring, 2/38;
flowered satin, 2/192;
coloured silk with silver lace, 5/325;
(EP) (in some cases already indexed under 'gown'): black sarcenet with yellow petticoat, 3/85;
country suit, 4/155;
riding, 4/184;
laced, 5/125;
moiré, 5/274;
flowered ash-coloured silk, 6/53;
with laced cuffs, 8/396;
flowered tabby, 9/134
train:
fashionable, 7/325;
held up by page, 3/126; 8/302
tunic: 8/576
vest (EP):
velvet, 8/469
vizard [see also above, mask]:
worn at play, 4/181 & n. 3;
and in court masque, 6/29;
(EP): 4/181; 8/423
waistcoats:
Queen Catherine's white laced, 4/229;
(EP):
slashed, 3/99 & n. 3;
farandine, 4/28;
white satin, 8/124;
black moiré, 8/242
whisk: 8/325;
(EP): white, 1/299;
lace, 6/55;
scallop whisk, 3/285
complete outfits:
(Queen Catherine), 4/229–30;
(EP): 8/124, 242
fashion:
velvet gowns, 4/2;
moiré gowns for winter, 3/298;
vizards in theatre, 4/181 & n. 3;
masculine riding dress, 6/172 & n. 4; 7/162;
Queen's fashion for skirts above ankle with train, 7/325, 335;
fashions change at Easter, 8/63;
importance of, 2/226, 230;
painting of face unfashionable, 3/89;
and Spanish farthingales, 3/92 & n. 2;
(EP): to be in fashion wears false hair, 3/51;
moiré winter gown/suit, 4/10;
hood, 6/102;
immodest décolletage, 7/379
mourning:
white scarves, 1/24 & n. 5;
black, plain hair and no patches, 7/106, 306;
Lady Falmouth's 'second or third', 7/178 & n. 2;
hoods, scarves and gloves, 8/134;
Duchess of York's black gown trimmed with ermine as second mourning, 8/570;
(EP): for Duke of Gloucester, 1/246, 248, 251;
mother-in-law, 9/134;
gown laced for second mourning, 8/210, 211, 242;
also, 2/202
misc.:
undress/deshabille, 3/99; 6/297, 335 & n. 1;
tight-lacing, 5/222;
servants' dress, 6/238 & n. 3; 7/329;
antic dress (Duchess of Newcastle), 8/243;
apron and pinner 'like a woman with child', 9/557
cosmetics:
paint used by Queen Catherine, 3/89 & n. 3;
Mrs Williams, 6/204;
E. Pearse, 8/439, 454, 503; 9/202;
Knipp and Nell Gwyn, 8/463;
Lady Carnegie, 9/383;
orange-flower water, 4/290;
(EP): puppy-dog water, 5/78;
May-dew, 8/240; 9/549, 551
hairdressing:
Princess Henrietta Maria 'frized short up to her ears', 1/299 & n. 4;
Queen Catherine wears 'à la négligence', 4/229–30;
false hair worn by F. Stuart, 8/44;
Knipp's hair 'tied behind', 8/389;
(EP): has hair dressed, 1/287;
false hair: 'perruques', 3/51;
white locks, 6/55; 7/346–7; 8/210–11; 9/454
washing:
(EP): 6/44;
for court visit, 1/298 & n. 3;
after house has been redecorated, 9/372;
for May Day parade, 9/538;
visits hot house, 6/40 & n. 1, 41
DRIBBLE:
DRINK:
p's drinking habits [see also Vows]:
drinking club, 1/208; 6/148 & n. 1;
headaches from drinking wine, 1/46, 84, 120, 218, 219, 307, 313, 321, 323; 2/34, 65, 99, 115, 186, 191, 211; 3/61, 151; 4/186; 8/5; 9/193;
gets drunk, 2/51, 87, 175, 186;
advised to drink less, 2/17;
effects of abstinence, 3/18, 31;
abstains from wine, 3/107, 112, 118, 119; 4/254; 5/312;
drinks wine in pg 94moderation, 3/130, 151, 163, 197; 4/235;
mixes wine with beer, 4/343, 410; 5/236;
relaxes vow during Plague, 6/226; 7/49;
alleged to be a drinker, 6/243;
drinks sack despite oath, 7/23;
and burnt wine, 8/130;
first morning visit to tavern for seven years, 9/220
healths:
puritan objections, 2/105 & n. 5; 5/172 & n. 4;
French method, 4/189;
loyal toast accompanied by gun salute, 1/152;
drunk kneeling, 1/121, 122; 2/87;
ladies toasted, 2/220; 7/246; 8/130–1
varieties:
brandy: 9/103, 498;
burned, 8/20
bristol milk: see wine
buttermilk: 5/152
chocolate: 1/178; 3/226–7; 4/5; 5/64, 139;
at coffee house, 5/329
cider: 3/300; 4/28, 121; 7/115; 8/315;
French, 4/254
coffee: 5/76, 77, 105
elder spirits: 4/221
gruel: 4/40
hippocras: see wine
julep: 1/181
lamb's wool: see ale
mead: 8/460
metheglin: 1/72; 7/218
milk: 4/29; 7/207; 9/224;
from milkmaid on Epsom Downs, 8/339;
from Keeper's Lodge, Hyde Park, 9/142 & n. 1, ? 154, 175, 184, 222, 260, 533–4
mum: see ale
muscadine: see wine
orange juice: 9/477 & n. 3
posset: 3/274; 4/40, 202, 319; 5/77;
sack posset: 1/9, 10, 11; 4/14, 38; 9/13;
in Davenant play, 9/134
purle: see beer
sack: see wine
strong waters:
EP for fainting fit, 4/307;
tea:
'cupp of tee', 1/253 & n. 5;
water:
[for spa water, see Health]:
also, 4/265; 6/23
wine:
Bristol milk: 9/236 & n. 1;
burnt: 7/295, 425; 8/47, 120, 130, 589;
canary: 2/211; 6/151;
claret: 1/277; 2/25; 4/65, 171; 6/151; 7/175, 375; 8/393;
burnt, 5/90; 7/386; 8/124;
English: from Walthamstow, 1/317; 8/341–2;
Florence wine: 1/324; 2/8;
Haut Brion ('Ho Bryan'): 4/100 & n. 4;
hippocras ('hypocras'): 4/354; 5/118;
Malaga (see also sack): 3/14; 6/151;
muscadine: 1/296;
Navarre: 9/443 & n. 1;
Rhenish: 2/125; 8/156;
with sugar, 2/38; 3/24;
Bleakard, 4/189 & n. 3;
sack: with wormwood, 2/9;
raspberry sack, 2/212;
Malaga, 4/235; 6/151;
mulled, 6/266; 7/424; 9/103;
anecdote of its killing toad, 7/290;
also, 1/57, 230, 292, 308; 2/25, 217, 219, 224; 5/32, 37; 6/224; 7/23, 166; 8/5; 9/227;
sherry: 3/14, 180;
tent: 4/405; 5/11, 222; 6/151;
wormwood: 1/301; 4/25, 58;
misc.: wine and sugar, 1/167; 4/179;
mulled white, 1/292;
wine traders' tricks, 7/256
wine cellars:
P orders jointly with colleagues, 3/14 & n. 3;
crested bottles, 4/346 & n. 1;
pride in stock, 6/151;
cellars at Audley End, 1/70 & n. 1; 8/467–8;
Whitehall palace, 1/193, 246, 247; 2/175;
and at Povey's, 4/18 & n. 2, 298; 5/161
DRUMBLEBY (Drumbelly), [D], flageolet maker, Strand:
the best in town, 8/53;
supplies flageolets, 8/53, 87; 9/30, 51, 160;
recorder, 9/157;
moulds for eye tubes, 9/278;
~ his boy, 9/364
DRURY LANE [see also Coffee-houses; Taverns etc.: Bear; Theatres]:
plague in, 7/72–3;
milkmaids in, 8/193
DRYDEN (Draydon), John (1631–1700) [see also Plays]:
known to P at Cambridge, 5/37 & n. 2;
known to P at Cambridge, 5/37 & n. 2;
share in authorship of Sir Martin Mar-all, 8/387 & n. 1, 468, n. 2;
alluded to: 8/363
DUBLIN:
Castle Plot, 4/168 & n. 2, 170;
packet boat, 4/256;
alluded to: 3/162
pg 95DUCK LANE:
booksellers in, 2/131; 6/332; 9/85, 86, 121, 148, 167, 260, 265, 543
DUCKINFORD, [D]: 4/343
DUCKING-POND FIELDS: 5/101 & n. 1
DUDLEY, Robert, 1st Earl of Leicester (d. 1588):
letters, 6/308 & n. 2
DUDLEY, [?William]: 1/83
[DUELL, Fleetwood], sexton, St Olave's, Hart St: 2/6 & n. 5;
?also, 3/3; 7/425; 9/21
DUGDALE, John, son of William; kted 1686 (d. 1700): 7/297 & n. 2;
DUGDALE, William, kted 1677, antiquarian (d. 1686):
losses of books in Fire, 7/297 & n. 2;
his Origines Juridiciales, ib.
DUKE, [George], secretary to Fishery Corporation: 5/223, 262, 314
DUKE (Dick, Dike) Shore, Lime-house:
P visits, 2/14; 7/126
DUMFRIES: 7/377 & n. 4
DUNCOMBE, [Sir Edward], of Battlesden, Beds., father of Sir John: 8/245 & n. 1
DUNCOMBE (Duncum, Dunkum), Sir John, M.P. Bury St Edmunds, Suff., 1660, 1661–79, Ordnance Commissioner 1664–70, Treasury Commissioner 1667–72:
character:
able, 8/178;
proud, 8/178 & n. 2, 244, 249, 251, 496, 501;
profane, 9/93;
unpopular, 9/205
as ordnance commissioner:
appointed, 5/316;
loan to Navy Board, 8/178;
proud of office's efficiency, 8/178–9 & nn.;
fears Commons, 8/179;
supports Navy Board against Carkesse, 8/215;
defends in Commons, 8/495–6;
also, 8/112
as treasury commissioner:
appointed, 8/223, 229–30;
Navy Board business, 8/433 & n. 1; 9/101, 122 & n. 1, 444–5;
unspecified business, 9/465
as privy councillor: 8/233–4, 278
general and misc.:
regard for P, 8/179; 9/105, 493;
for Coventry, 9/41;
jealous of Clifford, 8/185;
sudden rise, 8/234 & n. 1, 245, 249;
ridiculed in play, 9/471 & nn. 2, 3;
dismissal expected, 9/478 & n. 2;
lodgings, 8/178;
reminiscences of France, 9/93
ALLUDED TO: 9/415
DUNKIRK: sale to French:
disapproved of by merchants, 3/229 & n. 1;
by P, 3/230;
Sandwich's part in, 3/237 & n. 2; 7/55 & n. 4;
Clarendon blamed for, 4/223 & n. 3; 6/39; 7/55 & n. 4; 8/265, 269 & n. 2, 270, 402;
parliamentary enquiry, 8/485;
sale alluded to: 3/245, 272; 8/348;
coveted by Spain, 3/115;
French troops at, 8/265;
also, 1/101; 6/129;
alluded to: 1/105; 5/170; 7/146; 9/492
DUNN (Donne), [?Thomas]: 1/114, 115, 118, 121–2, 134, 171, 226;
social: 3/138;
alluded to: 1/162
DUNSTER, [Giles], merchant:
on Brooke House Committee, 9/254
DUPORT, [James], chaplain to the King (d. 1679):
preaches at Whitehall, 4/36–7 & n.
DUPPA, Brian, Bishop of Salisbury 1641–60, Winchester 1660–d.62:
preaches at Whitehall, 1/210 & n. 1;
also, 1/259
DUPUY, [Lawrence], Yeoman of the Robes to the Duke of York:
knave, 5/279 & n. 2;
also, 8/374
DURAS, Louis, Marquis de Blanquefort (d. 1709), succ. as 2nd Earl of Feversham 1677, Household officer of Duke of York:
influence, 7/163 & n. 2;
flatters Lady Castlemaine, 8/404;
at court, 9/468–9;
social: 6/29
DURDANS, the, nr Epsom, Surrey:
Lord Berkeley entertains royal party, 3/184;
P visits, 4/246;
P's boyhood memories, 3/184; 4/246
[DUREL, John], pastor of French church at the Savoy (d. 1683): 3/207 & nn.
DURHAM YARD:
Brooke House Committee in, 9/43;
DURY, Madam: 1/300
DUTCH CHURCH, the, Austin Friars:
exchange of congregations with French church, 3/277 & n. 1;
alluded to: 4/398
pg 96DUTTON, [D], servant to T. Povey:
his wife, 6/267
'DYAN', Ursula: see Ursler, Barbara DYKE (Dike), [Elizabeth]: mourns brother Edward P, 4/424;
DYMOKE, [Sir Edward], the King's Champion (d. 1664):
at coronation banquet, 2/85
DYVE (Dives), Sir Lewis:
story of prison escape, 8/566 & n. 3;
a gamester, 9/3 & n. 2
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