Helen Gardner (ed.), John Donne: The Elegies and The Songs and Sonnets

Contents
Find Location in text

Main Text

The Good-morrow

Notes Settings

Notes

Critical Apparatus
The Good-morrow. Cy omits. Title from 1633, TC
Editor’s Note
ll. 1–3. As in 'His Picture', ll. 17–20, Donne has borrowed from devotional literature the Pauline contrast between milk for babes and meat for grown men.
Critical Apparatus
2 lov'd?] lov'd, 163
Critical Apparatus
3 countrey … childishly 1633, H 40, C 57, H 49; childish … seelily Σ see note
Editor’s Note
l. 3. suck'don countrey pleasures, childishly. This reading(1633, H 40,I) is so much stronger than the weakly repetitive 'childish pleasures seelily' that it must be either the original of which the other is a corruption or an improvement made by the author. I incline to the second explanation because corruption does not seem a sufficient explanation either here or in l. 21 for transposition as well as alteration of words.
countrey pleasures: rustic, hence unrefined pleasures. Cf. 'country grasse', 'Love's Usury', l. 14, also 'To Sir Henry Wotton' (Grierson, i. 180–2), l. 61: 'A dramme of Countries dulnesse.' There may be a hint of what Hamlet intends in his riposte to Ophelia: 'Do you think I meant country matters?' If so, the lady, as well as her lover, has enjoyed such pleasures.
Critical Apparatus
4 snortec slumbred L 74, TC, HK 2, P, A 25, JC: l. 4 missing in B
i'the] in the 1633
Editor’s Note
l. 4. snorted; snored. This reading (1663, H 40,I, III) is again far more vivid than 'slumbred' (L 74, II, &c).
the seaven sleepers den. Under the persecution of Decius seven noble youths took refuge in a cave where their pursuers walled them up to starve to death. A miraculous slumber fell upon them which lasted 187 years. See the close of chapter xxxiii of Gibbon's Decline and Fall for the sources of this 'memorable fable'.
Critical Apparatus
5 and 'Twas … 'twas] T'was … t'was 1633
Editor’s Note
l. 5. But this: except for this.
Editor’s Note
ll. 6–7. If ever any beauty I did see, &c. Cf. Shakespeare, Sonnet xxxi, 'Thy bosom is endeared with all hearts'. Professor Praz cited a parallel from Tasso, Rime, i. xlii:
  • L'altre bellezze, ove m'insidia amore,
  • Sono imagini vostre e vostri raggi.
Critical Apparatus
10 For] But L 74, TC, HK 2, P,A 25 B, S
Critical Apparatus
11 one] a L 74, TC, HK 2, P, A 25, B
Editor’s Note
ll. 12–14. Let sea-discoverers, &c. This, again, is a commonplace of Elizabethan poetry; cf. Spenser, Amoretti xv: 'Ye tradefull Merchants, that with weary toyle.'
maps: probably 'maps' of the heavens showing new spheres. Cf. Holy Sonnet, 'I am a little world made cunningly':
  • You which beyond that heaven which was most high
  • Have found new sphears, and of new lands can write. …
Critical Apparatus
13 to others, worlds on world Σ: to other … 1633, Gr: to other worlds, one world JC, P,S:in studies, worlds … A 25
Critical Apparatus
14 our Σ: one 1633, C 57, H 49, JC, Gr: see note
Editor’s Note
l. 14. Let us possesse our world, each hath one, and is one. I do not doubt that the reading of 1633 ('one world') reproduces an error in Group I. The 'world' of each is the other. Since they are 'one' they possess one world which is 'ours', but there are also four worlds, since each 'hath one and is one'; see note to 'The Ecstasy',1. 36 (p. 185).
Critical Apparatus
16 true plaine] plaine true L 74 TC, HK 2, P,A 25,B
Critical Apparatus
17 better 1633, H 40, C 57, H 49, JC: fitter Σ
Editor’s Note
l. 17. two better hemispheares Presumably, as Grierson says, looking in each other's eyes each beholds only a hemisphere, since the whole world cannot be at once visible.
Critical Apparatus
19 was] is L 74, TC, HK 2,P, A 25, B
Editor’s Note
l.19. What ever dyes, was not mixt equally. Grierson cites Aquinas:
Non invenitur corruptio nisi ubi invenitur contrarietas; generationes enim et corruptiones ex contrariis et in contraria sunt (S.T., Ia pars, q. lxxv, art. 6).
Critical Apparatus
20 If our two] If both our L 74, TC, HK 2, A 25,B: If our both P
or] as H 40: and S: both O'F, HK 2, P, JC; see note
Editor’s Note
ll. 20–21. 'If our two loves are wholly united in one love, or, if they are always alike and at the same pitch, neither can perish.'
As in l. 3 it seems impossible to explain the variants in these two lines on any other theory than that of the poet's rewriting an unsatisfactory line. Neither version provides a close worthy of the poem's opening. Conditional clauses must always suggest an element of doubt.
Editor’s Note
21 Love … die 1633, H 40, C 57, H 49: Love just alike in all; none of these loves can die Σ see note
logo-footer Copyright © 2018. All rights reserved.
Access is brought to you by Log out