William Congreve

D. F. McKenzie (ed.), The Works of William Congreve, Vol. 1

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Critical ApparatusACT III. SCENE IX.

Sir Sampson and Foresight.

Critical Apparatus1

Sir SAMPSON. I Left 'em together here; what are they gone? Ben's a brisk Critical Apparatus2Boy: He has got her into a Corner, Father's own Son, faith, Editor’s NoteCritical Apparatus3he'll touzle her, and mouzle her: The Rogue's sharp set, Critical Apparatus4coming from Sea; if he should not stay for saying Grace, old Critical Apparatus5Foresight, but fall to without the help of a Parson, ha? Odd if Critical Apparatus6he shou'd I cou'd not be angry with him; 'twould be but like Editor’s NoteCritical Apparatus7me, A Chip of the old Block. Ha! thou'rt melancholick, old Critical Apparatus8Prognostication; as melancholick as if thou hadst spilt the Editor’s NoteCritical Apparatus9Salt, or par'd thy Nails on a Sunday:—Come, cheer up, look Critical Apparatus10about thee: Look up old Star-Gazer. Now is he poring upon 11the Ground for a crooked Pin, or an old Horse-Nail, with 12the Head towards him.

13

FORESIGHT. Sir Sampson, we'll have the Wedding to Morrow Morning.

pg 321 14

Sir SAMPSON. With all my Heart.

15

FORESIGHT. At ten a Clock, punctually at ten.

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Sir SAMPSON. To a Minute, to a Second; thou shall set thy Watch, and the Critical Apparatus17Bridegroom shall observe its Motions; they shall be Critical Apparatus18marry'd to a Minute, go to Bed to a Minute; and when Editor’s Note19the Alarm strikes, they shall keep time like the Figures of 20St. Dunstan's Clock, and Consummatum est shall ring all Critical Apparatus21over the Parish—

Notes Settings

Notes

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0.1 SCENE IX] Enter Qq.
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1 what‸ ] ⁓, Q4, W2.
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2 Boy:] ⁓; Q4.
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2 Son,] ⁓‸ Q1.
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3 he'll] he'l Q1–2.
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3 touzle her, and mouzle her] The primary meaning of both verbs here is 'to pull (a woman) about rudely, indelicately, or in horse-play'; so too Wycherley, The Country-Wife (1675), ii. i. 16–17. See also OB iv. viii. 5. But 'mousle' here may also imply a form of kissing. Citing this, OED also gives Wycherley, The Country-Wife, iv. ii. 36–7: 'he put the tip of his tongue between my lips, and so musl'd me'. Under 'muzzle' (v.1 2c) it gives Johnson's definition 'To fondle with the mouth close. A low word' and cites L'Estrange, Fables, ccxix. 192, as the earliest example in this form.
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3 sharp set] with sails set for maximum speed, but also with a sharp sexual edge; for the latter, see Hamlet, iii. ii. 236–7 ('keen … edge').
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4 Sea;] ⁓, Q1–2.
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4 *saying] Q1; saving W1 (probably a broken 'y').
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5 to] too Q1–2, W2.
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6 shou'd] should Q1–2, 4.
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6 cou'd] could Q4.
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6 'twould] twould Q1.
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7 melancholick] melancholly Q1–3; melancholy Q4.
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7 A Chip of the old Block] Tilley C352; Wilson, Proverbs, 121.
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8 melancholick] melancholly Q1–3; melancholy Q4.
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9 par'd] pair'd W2.
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9 on] of Qq.
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9 par'd thy Nails on a Sunday] Tilley N10. Summers (ii. 265) cites an old rhyme:
  •                Who on the Sabbath pareth his horn,
  •                Better for him had he never been born.
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9–10 look about thee] Dent L427.1.
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10 up‸ ] ⁓, Q4, W2.
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10 Star-Gazer.‸ ] Star-Gazer.— W2.
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17 its] it's Q1–3.
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18 marry'd] married Q1–3.
Editor’s Note
19–20 Figures of St. Dunstan's Clock] two figures with knotted clubs which strike the quarter hours at St Dunstan's Church, between Chancery Lane and Fetter Lane, London. Erected in 1671, it is said to have been the first clock in London on which the minutes were marked, hence Sir Sampson's timing 'to a Minute'.
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21 Parish—] ⁓. Qq.
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