William Shakespeare

Colin Burrow (ed.), The Oxford Shakespeare: The Complete Sonnets and Poems

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pg 530 pg 531 75

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Notes

Editor’s Note
1 So … life 'you nourish my thoughts as food nourishes life'
Editor’s Note
2 sweet seasoned gentle and temperate. Seasoned carries the senses 'Seasonable, opportune, suitable' (OED 1) and 'Flavoured, spiced' (OED 2). Some editors read 'sweet-seasoned', meaning both 'tempered with gentleness or sweetness' and perhaps 'of the sweet season' (Pooler).
Critical Apparatus
3 peace] q; price or sake conj. Malone
Editor’s Note
3 for the peace of you In order to obtain the peace afforded by your company
Editor’s Note
5 proud as an enjoyer glorying in his material possession. To have 'enjoyment' of something is in effect to have possession of it.
Editor’s Note
6 Doubting fearing
filching age thievish age in which we live
Editor’s Note
7 counting reckoning. The word bridges the gap between the miser, obsessively counting his money, and the lover's assessment of what is most enjoyable.
Editor’s Note
8 bettered … pleasure thinking it better than what I had thought best (that is, privately contemplating you) that everyone should see the source of my delight
Editor’s Note
10 clean is an adverb: completely, utterly.
Editor’s Note
12 Save what … took except what is received from you or which must be taken from you (presumably because the friend will not always voluntarily supply it). For the sexual senses of 'have' and 'take' see Partridge, 119 and 197,
Editor’s Note
13 pine starve. Cf. Lucrece l. 1115.
Editor’s Note
14 Or … away Either feasting on every delight, or with all my source of nourishment absent. Gluttoning is the first cited instance in OED of the verb.
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