William Shakespeare

Colin Burrow (ed.), The Oxford Shakespeare: The Complete Sonnets and Poems

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pg 434 pg 435 27

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Notes

Critical Apparatus
2 travail] q; travel gildon 1714
tirèd] q; tir'd malone 1790
Editor’s Note
2 travail Q's 'trauaill' can mean either 'travail' (labour) or 'travel'. Since the pun is worked so strongly here Q's form has been retained.
Critical Apparatus
4 expirèd] q; expir'd malone 1790
Editor’s Note
4 expirèd ended, with perhaps an allusion to the widespread view of sleep as a little death
Editor’s Note
5 from for far away from you
Editor’s Note
6 Intend (a) 'proceed on (a journey, etc.)' (OED 6); (b) 'have in the mind as a fixed purpose' (OED 18); (c) 'To turn one's thoughts to' (OED 12)
Editor’s Note
6 zealous is frequently used of enthusiastic religious devotion in the period, so it reinforces the devotedness of a pilgrimage.
Editor’s Note
8 which such as. It is a darkness so intense that it resembles the nothingness seen by the blind.
Editor’s Note
9 Save except
imaginary sight sight enabled by the faculty of imagination. Imagination is the faculty 'whereby the soul beholdeth the likeness of bodily things when they be absent', Batman upon Bartholomew (1582), fo, 14r.
Critical Apparatus
10 thy] malone (conj. Capell); their q
Editor’s Note
10 thy Q reads 'their'. See 26.12 n.
shadow 'An unreal appearance; a delusive semblance or image; a vain and unsubstantial object of pursuit. Often contrasted with substance' (OED 6 fig. a). The shadow, dark though it is, has a mental brilliance since it is the image of the beloved, whose beauty makes even a shadow shine through the night.
Editor’s Note
11–12 Which … beauteous Cf. Romeo 1.5.44–5: 'It seems she hangs upon the cheek of night | As a rich jewel in an Ethiope's ear'.
Editor’s Note
14 For … for (a) on account of; (b) 'to the comfort of'
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