Colin Burrow (ed.), The Oxford Shakespeare: The Complete Sonnets and Poems

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Critical Apparatuspg 365 19

  • 13A belt of straw and ivy buds,
  • 14With coral clasps and amber studs,
  • pg 36615And if these pleasures may thee move,
  • Critical Apparatus16Then live with me, and be my love.
Love's Answer
  • Critical Apparatus17If that the world and love were young,
  • 18And truth in every shepherd's tongue,
  • 19These pretty pleasures might me move
  • Critical Apparatus20To live with thee and be thy love.

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Notes

Critical Apparatus
poem 19 Sir Hugh Evans sings fragments of Christopher Marlowe's 'Come live with me' as he waits for Dr Caius (Merry Wives (probably first performed 1597) 3.1.16–25). This may have influenced Jaggard in his attribution of this version to Shakespeare, or it may have made him feel his readers would find the attribution convincing. A longer version of the poem is attributed to Marlowe in England's Helicon (1600), and it had an extensive afterlife in manuscript miscellanies. Gill (212) suggests that this version 'may have been an early draft for the poem as it appears fully in England's Helicon'. The final stanza printed here is from 'The Nymph's Reply', commonly attributed to Sir Walter Ralegh. The omission of the final five stanzas of the 'The Nymph's Reply' here is probably the consequence of pressures of space: at this point in o2 the compositor had to abandon his earlier practice of setting poems only on the recto of each page in order to keep the volume within four sheets folded to make thirty-two pages.
Critical Apparatus
1 Live] o2; Come live eh
Critical Apparatus
3 hills and valleys, dales and fields] o2; Vailles, groues, hills and fieldes eh
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4 and … craggy] o2; Woods, or steepie eh
mountains yield] o2; mountaine yeeldes eh
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5 There will we] o2; And wee will eh
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6 And see] o2; Seeing eh
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7 by] o2; to eh
falls] o2; tales O3
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8 sing] o2; sings eh
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8 madrigals The vogue for madrigals, polyphonic settings of short poems often on amorous subjects, began in 1588 with the publication of Nicholas Yonge's Musica Transalpina: Madrigals translate of four, five and six parts. This continues one of a number of allusions to fashionable musical forms in the volume. See notes to Poems 8.5, 16.9, 17.23.
Critical Apparatus
9 There will I] o2; And I will eh
a bed] o2; beds eh
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10 With … posies] o2 (poses); And … poesies eh
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11 kirtle skirt (it can also be a shirt or tunic)
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12] o2; eh includes an additional stanza here: A gowne made of the finest wooll, | Which from our pretty Lambes we pull, | Fayre lined slippers for the cold: | With buckles of the purest gold.
Critical Apparatus
16] o2; eh includes an additional stanza here: The Sheepheards Swaines shall daunce & sing, | For thy delight each May-morning, | If these delights thy minde may moue; | Then liue with mee, and be my loue
Then] o2; Come eh
Critical Apparatus
17 Love's Answer] o2; The Nimphs reply to the Sheepheard eh
Critical Apparatus
17 that] o2; all eh
Critical Apparatus
20 thy] o2; my o3; eh includes five additional stanzas here
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