Michael Kiernan (ed.), The Oxford Francis Bacon, Vol. 15: The Essayes or Counsels, Civill and Morall

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Critical Apparatus Of Discourse. [2C1V] Critical Apparatus XXXII.

Critical Apparatus3Some in their Discourse, desire rather Commendation of Wit, Critical Apparatus4in being able to hold all Arguments, then of Judgment, in Critical Apparatus5discerning what is True: As if it were a Praise, to know what Editor’s NoteCritical Apparatus6might be Said, and not what should be Thought. Some have Editor’s Note7certaine Common Places, and Theames, wherein they are 8good, and want Variety: Which kinde of Poverty is for the Critical Apparatus9most part Tedious, and when it is once perceived, Ridiculous. Editor’s NoteCritical Apparatus10The Honourablest Part of Talke, is to give the Occasion; And Critical Apparatus11againe to Moderate and passe to somewhat else; For then pg 104Critical Apparatus12a Man leads the Daunce. It is good, in Discourse, and Speech Critical Apparatus13of Conversation, to vary, and entermingle Speech, of the Editor’s NoteCritical Apparatus14[2C2] present Occasion with Arguments; Tales with Rea-|sons; 15Asking of Questions, with telling of Opinions; and Jest with Editor’s NoteCritical Apparatus16Earnest: For it is a dull Thing to Tire, and, as we say now, to Critical Apparatus17Jade, any Thing too farre. As for Jest, there be certaine Editor’s Note18Things, which ought to be priviledged from it; Namely Critical Apparatus19Religion, Matters of State, Great Persons, Any Mans present Critical Apparatus20Businesse of Importance, And any Case that deserveth Pitty. Critical Apparatus21Yet there be some, that thinke their Wits have been asleepe; 22Except they dart out somewhat, that is Piquant, and to the Editor’s Note23Quicke: That is a Vaine, which would be brideled;

Editor’s Note24Parce Puer stimulis, et fortiùs utere Loris.

Critical Apparatus25And generally, Men ought to finde the difference, between Editor’s Note26Saltnesse and Bitternesse. Certainly, he that hath a Satyricall 27vaine, as he maketh others afraid of his Wit, so he had need Editor’s Note28be afraid of others Memory. He that questioneth much, shall Critical Apparatus29learne much, and content much; But especially, if he apply Critical Apparatus30his Questions, to the Skill of the Persons, whom he asketh: | Critical Apparatus31[2C2V] For he shall give them occasion, to please themselves in Critical Apparatus32Speaking, and himselfe shall continually gather Knowledge. Critical Apparatus33But let his Questions, not be troublesome; For that is fit for 34a Poser. And let him be sure, to leave other Men their Turnes 35to speak. Nay, if there be any, that would raigne, and take up 36all the time, let him finde meanes to take them off, and to Editor’s Note37bring Others on; As Musicians use to doe, with those, that Editor’s NoteCritical Apparatus38dance too long Galliards. If you dissemble sometimes your pg 10539knowledge, of that you are thought to know; you shall be Editor’s Note40thought another time, to know that, you know not. Speach Critical Apparatus41of a Mans Selfe ought to be seldome, and well chosen. I knew 42One, was wont to say, in Scorne; He must needs be a Wise 43Man, he speakes so much of Himselfe: And there is but one Critical Apparatus44Case, wherein a Man may Commend Himselfe, with good Critical Apparatus45Grace; And that is in commending Vertue in Another; Critical Apparatus46Especially, if it be such a Vertue, whereunto Himselfe Editor’s NoteCritical Apparatus47pretendeth. Speech of Touch towards Others, should be spa-| Editor’s Note48ringly used: For Discourse ought to be as a Field, without [2C3] Editor’s NoteCritical Apparatus49comming home to any Man. I knew two Noble-men, of the 50West Part of England; Whereof the one was given to Scoffe, 51but kept ever Royal Cheere in his House: The other, would 52aske of those, that had beene at the Others Table; Tell truely, 53was there never a Flout or drie Blow given; To which the 54Guest would answer; Such and such a Thing passed: The 55Lord would say; I thought he would marre a good Dinner. 56Discretion of Speech, is more then Eloquence; And to speak Critical Apparatus57agreeably to him, with whom we deale, is more then to 58speake in good Words, or in good Order. A good continued Critical Apparatus59Speech, without a good Speech of Interlocution, shews Critical Apparatus60Slownesse: And a Good Reply, or Second Speech, without Critical Apparatus61a good Setled Speech, sheweth Shallownesse and Weaknesse. Editor’s Note62As we see in Beasts, that those that are Weakest in the Course, Critical Apparatus63are yet Nimblest in the Turne: As it is betwixt the Grey-64hound, and the Hare. To use too many Circumstances, ere Critical Apparatus65one come to the Matter, is Wearisome; To use none at all, is 66Blunt. |

Notes Settings

Notes

Critical Apparatus
1 Of Discourse.] Discourses T; essay not in H67
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2 XXXII.] 2. C, H62, L, T, 97a12a, 12c; 12. H51; 19. 12b, 13a24
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3 their] om. H62, L, T
Commendation] commendacions H62
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4 Arguments, … Judgment ] Arguments 13c, 24
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5 Praise] interlined in H62
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6 might] mought H62
Critical Apparatus

Emendation of Accidentals.

6 Thought.] 25 (third-state corr.); ⁓‸ 25(u)
Editor’s Note
6. should be Thought: i.e. because it is true. The contrast is between those who talk to display their wit and those who talk to discover a serious point.
Editor’s Note
7–9. Common Places, … Ridiculous : Wright compares Plutarch, Morals, A4V. Bacon criticizes those who cannot get beyond their own commonplaces and hobby-horses. He recommends commonplaces, however, as a stimulation to invention, part of a speaker's or writer's 'Promptuary or Preparatory Store', and includes a collection of pro/ contra sentences in De Aug., describing them as 'commonplaces [contracted] into certain acute and concise sentences; to be as skeins or bottoms of thread which may be unwinded at large when they are wanted' (iv. 472; i. 688). As noted throughout the Commentary, there are numerous points of contact between this collection and the essays.
Critical Apparatus
9 perceived,] perceived 25
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9 when … perceived ] nowe and then Σ, 97a24
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10 Part] kind 12b (H51)–24
give the] give H62; guide the 97a
Editor’s Note
10. give the Occasion: 'provide the opportunity.'
Critical Apparatus
11–12 For … Daunce. ] not in Σ, 97a24
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12–13 in … Conversation ] not in Σ, 97a24
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12 Discourse,] 25 (first-state corr.); ⁓; 25(u)
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13 entermingle] mixe Σ, 97a24
of] to 13c, 24 (cw of)
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14 present] private H62
with Arguments] with argument L, 97a12a, 12b24; with of Argument H51
Editor’s Note
14. present … Arguments : i.e. mix matters of the moment with more substantial topics.
Tales with Reasons: i.e. 'anecdotes with main points of the discussion'.
Critical Apparatus
16–17 For … farre. ] not in Σ, 97a24
Editor’s Note
16–17. as we say now, to Jade: the verb is a recent coinage; OED, s.v. 'jaded', cites Antony and Cleopatra (1606–7), III. i. 34, as the earliest instance: 'to make ajade of [a horse], to fatigue, weary'; lemma appears to be the earliest figurative use.
Critical Apparatus
17–18 As … it; ] But some things are priviledged from jest, Σ, 97a24 (the jeaste H62)
Editor’s Note
18–19. priviledged … Religion : ODEP cites 'It is an old saying, Non est bonum ludere cum Sanctis' (1587). Cf. xvi. 59 n.
Critical Apparatus
19 Any Mans] all mens C
present] pryvate H62
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20 And] or L
Pitty.] much pity (much deleted) L
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21–4 Yet … Loris. ] not in Σ, 97a24
Editor’s Note
23. a Vaine, … brideled : cf. Tilley F708, 'He would rather lose a friend than his jest'; J40, 'Better lose a jest than a friend'; Quintilian, Inst. Orat. VI. iii. 28. Sir Robert Naunton, Fragmenta Regalia (1641), D1V, credits Bacon's father with the saying; Drummond of Hawthornden attributes the fault to Ben Jonson (Jonson, Works, i. 151). Cf. also Tilley J46, 'Leave jesting while it pleases lest it turn to earnest'.
Editor’s Note
24. Parce … Loris : 'Spare the lash, boy, and use the reins more strongly.' Ovid, Met. ii. 127 (Phoebus to Phaethon).
Critical Apparatus
25–8 And … Memory. ] not in Σ, 97aH51
Editor’s Note
26. Saltnesse and Bitternesse: cf. Apoph. vii. 123.
Editor’s Note
28–35. questioneth much, … speak : cf. Rawley's account of discourse at Bacon's table (i. 12).
Critical Apparatus
29 learne … much ] learne much H62, L, T
But especially] speciallye H62, T, 97a13b, 14; especially C, L; so specially 13c, 24
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30 Questions] question 12c
Persons, whom] person of whom H62, L, T, 97aH51; party of whom C; persons of whom 12b24
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31 them occasion] thoccasion T
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32 continually] still L
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33–8 But … Galliards. ] not in Σ, 97a24
Editor’s Note
37–8. As Musicians … Galliards : galliard, a lively court dance in triple time. It was often included among the social dances of the 'revels' portion of the masque, during which the costumed masquers danced with select members of the audience. Just what device the musicians used to bring one group off and another on is not clear —presumably a change in tune or tempo. The revels portion was of indeterminate length; it had to be ended, with the dance-floor cleared of audience, before the final dances and formal exit of the masquers.
Critical Apparatus
38 you] sometimes you C
dissemble sometimes] do sometymes dissemble L; dissemble C
Editor’s Note
38–9. dissemble … knowledge : cf. AL iii. 464.
Editor’s Note
40–1. Speach of a Mans Selfe … seldome : cf. Cicero, De officiis, i. 38; liiii. 49–56.
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41–3 ought … Himselfe: ] is not good often Σ, 97a24
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44 Case] thing C
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44–5 good Grace] a grace H62
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45 in commending] commending C
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46 whereunto] as whereunto Σ, 97a24
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47–9 Speech … Man. ] not in Σ, 97aH51
Critical Apparatus
47 towards] toward 12b
Editor’s Note
47. Speech of Touch towards Others: i.e. affecting other persons. Cf. lvii. 38–9 (only these citations in OED).
Editor’s Note
48–9. Field, … home : i.e. a field held in common.
Critical Apparatus
49–55 I … Dinner. ] not in Σ, 97a24
Editor’s Note
49–50. two Noble-men, of the West Part: untraced.
Critical Apparatus
57 agreeably] agreable H62, T
Critical Apparatus
59, 60 without] wth T
Critical Apparatus
59–60 shews Slownesse] sheweth slownesse Σ, 97a24 (shallownesse H62)
Critical Apparatus
60–3 And … Turne: ] not in H62
Critical Apparatus
60 Good … Speech ] good second speache C, L, T
Critical Apparatus
61 Setled] set C, L, T, 97a12a, 12c (ink corr. to lemma in Trinity-Malone copy of 97b)
Critical Apparatus
61–3 and … Turne ] not in C, L, T
Editor’s Note
62. As … Beasts : cf. AL iii. 394.
Critical Apparatus
63–4 As … Hare. ] not in Σ, 97a24
Critical Apparatus
63–4 Grey-hound] ⁓-⁓ 25
Critical Apparatus
65 one] a man L
the] his L
Wearisome;] wearisome, and C, L
all,] all‸ Σ, 97aH51
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