Main Text

pg 529INDEX OF SUBJECTS

Note. The subject index covers Bentham's text of the Constitutional Code, and the various entries refer to the chapters, sections (at times, bis-sections), and articles and not to the page numbers. For example, a reference to Chapter VIII, Section 3, Article 1 will appear as VIII.3.A1. Where a series of articles appear in the index, the chapter and section are not' repeated. There are two kinds of cross-references. Where a reference appears in the middle of an entry in square brackets, e.g. [19, See SUBORDINATE AND SUPERORDINATE], this means that to save space and avoid undue repetition, the relevant material will be found under the referred subject at the same point, i.e. at SUBORDINATE AND SUPERORDINATE at Section 19. The cross-references at the end of the entry refer more generally to related material.

The symbol 'v.' is used below to indicate 'as distinct from' or 'as opposed to '. Other abbreviations for frequently occurring words and phrases are:

legislature

leg.

sublegislature(s)

subleg(s).

exercise(s)/ed

ex.

function(s)

f(s).

appropriate aptitude

app. apt.

public opinion tribunal

p.o. trib.

prime minister

p.m.

department(s)

dept(s).

subdepartment(s)

subdept(s).

max imize(d)/maximization

max.

minimize(d)/minimization

min.

ABBREVIATION(S): IX.7.6th.A1, use of abbreviations in ex. of statistic f. determined by leg.; A2, arguments for and against practice; A3–5, rules for abbreviations enumerated; A5n, Italian bookkeeping nomenclature criticized; A5n, use of Latin abbreviations in English practice criticized; A6, securities for correct and complete entries enumerated; IX.8.A33, abbreviations and requisitive f.
ABSTRACT(S): IX.25.A9, use of abstracts in preparing registers
ABUNDANCE: VII.2, max. of abundance as positive end of government
ADMINISTRATIVE AUTHORITY: IV.A1, administrative authority one of four in state; A3, leg. to locate and dislocate chiefs of administrative depts. And upon occasion to give individual and general direction; A4, administrative dept, to give execution and effect to ordinances of leg.; A6, administrative and legislative depts. compose government; A6, administrative and judiciary depts. compose executive; A6, executive and legislative depts. compose the operative; A7, use of word 'supreme' discussed; A8, for each authority, a dept.; A10, within administrative dept., there are 13 subdepts.; A11, administrative dept, and local and logical fields of service; A13, single-seated arrangements in administrative dept.; VI.1.A5, administrative authority dependent on legislative authority; A6, where non-performance or inaptitude, leg. can pg 530take over fs. of administrative authority; VII. 12, encroachment by leg. on administrative authority; VIII.2.A2, administrative authority and p.m.'s ex. of directive f.; IX.26.A11, publicity and secrecy in administrative dept.; A54, offices separate from judiciary. See MINISTER(S)
ADVOCATE(S): VI.27.33–4, use of professional advocates before legislative enquiries. See LAWYER(S)
AMENDMENT(S): V.5.A6, headings relevant to formulation of amendments; A7, amendments and the preservation of symmetry ; A8, reasons and effects to be given for proposing amendments; VI.29.1–6, emendative ordinances; VII.1.3–5, provision for amendment to legislator's inaugural declaration; IX.25.A37, amendments and securities against ex. of extraordinary power by functionaries. See MOTION(S)
ANALOGY: IX.19.A31n, 'one of the great instruments in the hand of inventive genius'
ANARCHY: II.A24, 'spice of anarchy' in English government; VII.6, anarchy and tax on judicial services; IX.19.A29, and distribution of grades in army; 25.A57, and relief against oppression
ANTI-CONSTITUTIONAL OFFENCE(S): V.6.A3, prohibition or taxation of political tracts is anti-constitutional offence; VI.2.A2, ordinances of leg. which are contrary to constitution; VIII.5.A4, failure to hold election for p.m. See ARBITRARINESS; CONSTITUTION; LEGISLATION PENAL JUDICATORY
APPLICATION FUNCTION: VI.27.A39, ex. in preparation of legislation enquiry report. See MANDATE(S); WRITTEN INSTRUMENT(S)
APPLICATIVE FUNCTION: IX.4.A49, ex. by ministers collectively in regard to things; A49, A70, defined; A49, applicative v. directive f.; A49, and eliminative f.; IX.7.2nd.A24, and use of mimographical or receptacular mode of registration; 3rd.A19, and application book
APPOSITENESS: VI.27.A44, as desirable property of evidence. See EVIDENCE
APTITUDE AND INAPTITUDE: II.A2, apt. max., as means to greatest happiness; A14, app. apt. for rulers v. rulees; A15, branches of appt. apt.: moral, intellectual (cognitional and judicial), active; A16, rules for max. of app. apt.; A17, app. apt. and the min. of expense, principles employed; A19, securities and max. of app. apt.; A22, punishment for moral inaptitude, dislocation for active and intellectual inaptitude; VI.1.6–7, app. apt. and fs. of leg. in relation to subordinate authorities; A9, app. apt. and differences of opinion between constituents and deputy; 23.A23–6, app. apt. and deputy's substitute; 24.A1, app. apt. and continuation committee; A18, leg. best judges of app. apt. of continuation committee; 25.A8, temporary non-relocability system and apt.; A17–19, undiscontinued relocability and inaptitude; A32–7, temporary non-relocability, experience, and app. apt.; A42–5, app. apt. and period of founding new states discussed; A50, moral apt., p.o. trib., and liberty of press; A52, temporary non-relocability, freedom of choice and app. apt.; A53, app. apt. and temporary non-relocability v. undiscontinued relocability; 28.A8, moral and intellectual apt. and appointment of judges to legislation penal judicatory; A16, app. apt. and appellate judicatory; 31.A1, abuse of power, securities and app. apt.; A24, reception of securities as test of app. apt. of person; A41n, apt. and English judicial practice; VII.2, app. apt. and the ends of government; 4, legislator's duties in ensuring app. apt. of functionaries; 7, app. apt. and elections by leg. of p.m., justice minister, and legislation minister; 12, leg. and inaptitude of subordinate authorities; VIII.7.A1, pg 531app. apt. and location of p.m.; 12.A1, p.m. and securities for app. apt.; A2–4, p.m. to act on information of misconduct or inaptitude of ministers; IX.3.A3, moral apt. and number in office; A4, intellectual apt. and number in office; A5, active apt. and number in office; A12–13, inaptitude in boards in English practice; 9.A3, app. apt. of functionaries noted in ex. of inspective f.; 10.A26, inaptitude in English practice with distant dependencies; 15.A1–3, apt. max. in remuneration and location; A3, apt. dependent on man's relish for occupation; A3–4, apt. in inverse proportion to remuneration; A38, ultra-concomitant remuneration, a premium on inaptitude; 16.A3, app. apt. and location system; A3, 'scale of aptitude' in location system; A7, courses of instruction increasing app. apt.; A9, those reaping benefit from courses preferred in location over those without acquired apt., as security for app. apt.; A12, apt. and situations of talent; A33, comparative apt. of instructors exhibited in ranking table; A34, leg. will limit topics for interrogation by qualification judicatory regarding moral apt.; A34, judges, quasi-jurymen and competitors (with permission) may interrogate; A34, for app. moral apt., irregularities of sexual appetite, prohibited subject of enquiry; A35, until leg. limits topics, unlimited liberty of interrogation; A35, interrogation regarding moral apt. may be limited by majority of judges or by candidate; A35, responsibility for false statements indicated; A36, results of enquiry into moral apt. entered in candidates' character book; A37, app. moral apt. not subject of voting; A37, but results available to each locator; A40–1, no candidate refused entry on locable list on grounds of intellectual and moral inaptitude unless by express decree of majority of judges; A41, record of moral inaptitude printed and published by registrar; A47–9, max. of app. apt. of instructors; A58, app. apt. and preparation period; A59, after one year, to exclude inaptitude, no one placed on locable list without instruction, when available; A60, leg. to make arrangements for examination of app. moral apt.; A61, use of chance to max. apt. in examination system; A62, responses and exhibitions, as tokens of app. apt.; 17.A43, pecuniary competition and app. moral apt. in situation of simple trust; A47, in English practice, as expense of official labour max., app. apt. min.; A52, unopulence as a cause of apt. discussed; A53–6, pecuniary competition system an instrument for app. apt.; A59, apt. does not increase with increase of pay and opulence; 17.Con.Inst.Aln, application of instruction system to nation and app. apt.; 19.A12, app. apt. and increase in remuneration while in office; A24–5, repetition of qualification examination in filling vacancies and app. apt.; A35, securing app. apt. in corrupt government; A36, lot preferred to choice in corrupt government; 21.A33, app. apt. and adequate penal code; A50, and dislocation instrument; A51, and resignation; 24.A4, app. apt. of ministers as well as legislators used to secure pannomion from deterioration; 25.A1, elements of app. apt. distinguished: moral, active, intellectual (cognitional, judicial); A45, lowest degree of cognitional and judicial apt. necessary for following precedents; 26.A1, importance of art-and-science of architecture to app. apt. of administrative dept.; A20n, app. apt. and Panopticon; A47, app. apt. and military guards v. watchmen and porters. See LOCATION AND DISLOCATION; MAXIMIZATION AND MINIMIZATION; MORAL; PUBLIC OPINION TRIBUNAL; SECURITIES
ARBITRARINESS: VIII.12.A1, checks to arbitrary appointments by p.m.; IX.15.A8, arbitrary remuneration repugnant to constitution; A9, arbitrary remuneration neither good nor evil; A10, arbitrary remuneration defined as that not judicially conferred; A35, arbitrary conferring of factitious dignity pg 532sufficient to destroy constitution; 16.A3, dislocative power a check to arbitrary patronage by p.m.; 17.Con.Inst.Al, location system, apt. and arbitrary power; 19.A10, arbitrary v. judicial dislocation; A14, arbitrariness and remuneration for longevity ; 21.A20, arbitrary v. judicially-grounded modes of procedure. See MONARCHY
ARBITRATIVE FUNCTION: VI.3.A1, A4, ex. by leg. in relation to sublegs.
ARCHITECTURE: VI.20.A24, good government depends on architecture; IX.21.A20, architectural arrangements, publicity, and indirectly-applying remedies against oppression; 26.A1, importance of art and science of architecture to app. apt. of administrative dept.; A2, ends in view; A3, app. arrangements to reduce delay, vexation, and expense for both functionaries and suitors; A4, importance of publicity and secrecy to max. good and min. evil; A5–6, subjects for consideration in choosing publicity and secrecy; A7, varying demands for publicity and secrecy as between depts., subdepts., and offices; A8–9, greatest secrecy required in constitutive dept, in secret ballot; A10, greatest publicity required in judiciary dept.; A1l, intermediate publicity in administrative dept.; A12, uses of publicity and architectural arrangements as means thereto; A13–14, delay in communication discussed; A14, delay min. where there is direct communication; A15, importance of contiguous offices; A16, offices defined; A17, ministers' offices arranged in a crescent with p.m.'s office in centre for instant communication; A17–18, except for election and legislation ministers' offices; A19&n, use of conversation tubes for instant communication; A20, contiguous offices have additional advantage of security for transfer of papers; A20n, importance of inspection noted; A21, arrangements for oral communication between suitors and functionaries with use of waiting boxes, public and private; A22, uses of waiting boxes to augment publicity and secure observance of deportment rules; A23, arrangements for light; A24, arrangements for treasury to store official books and papers; A25, arrangements for apartments where ministers and families live; A26–7, private waiting boxes; A28–9, arrangements for minister to attend to public and private waiting-boxes; A30, admission to and exit from public and private waiting-boxes; A31&n, extra security for secret suitors; A32–4, justification of secret meetings between ministers and suitors discussed; A35–7, reward for informers discussed; A38–9, arrangements for living accommodation for ministers discussed; A40, expense in representative democracy v. monarchy; A41, importance of frequent change of ministers; A42, arrangements for security of buildings and contents against loss, examples given; A43, loss of manuscripts in treasury min. by registration and publication system; A44, causes of indiscriminate destruction and deterioration stated; A45, causes of furtive abstraction stated; A46, need in republic to protect public property from popular commotion; A47, military guard v. watchmen and porters for security ; A48, in monarchy, all but one become slaves; A49–52, greatest happiness requires residence of functionaries located where of most use; A53, offices of functionaries, U.S. practice; A54, offices of judiciary should be separated from administrative dept.
ARGUMENTATIVE FUNCTION: IX.24.A1, ex. by ministers in debates in leg.
ARISTOCRACY: II.A24, and English government; VI.31.34–5, and reception to securities; VIII.5.A4, representative democracy changed to monarchy and aristocracy where leg. fails to elect p.m.; 11.A6, democracy altered to aristocracy by publicity given to secret voting; IX.20.A12, aristocracy and secret institutions; 25.A47–8, as sub-class opposed to universal interest; A53, and pg 533corruption; 26.A52, pure aristocracy worst form of government. See ENGLISH PRACTICE; MIXED MONARCHY; MONARCHY
ARMY MINISTER: IX.2.A1, serves under p.m.; 9.A7, joint visits with navy minister in ex. of inspective f.; 16.A15, requisite talents for post; 19.A40–1, and power of dislocation; 26.A47, provides subordinates for maintaining security of public property. See ARMY SUBDEPARTMENT; MILITARY SERVICE; MINISTER(S)
ARMY SUBDEPARTMENT: VI.27.A15, functionaries in field and powers of legislation enquiry judicatory; VIII.2.A8, A10–12, A14–16, ex. of imperative f. by p.m. as commander-in-chief; 11.A6–7, where publicity may be harmful; A15–17, and time-limits on secrecy; IX.2.A10, potentially joined with navy and preventive service subdepts.; A10n, army courts martial and judiciary; 5.A35, largest number of grades in subdept.; A37, English practice of large numbers in higher grades max. expense; A39, English v. U.S. practice; IX.9.A4, offices to be visited in ex. of inspective f.; 11.A9, extraction of information for defence purposes; 16.A15, talent-requiring situations and requisite talents, examples given; 17.A17, minimum age for service as lowest grade of officer; A23–6, need for temporarily initiative location; 20.A1, legislator to consider applicability of arrangements for obviation of insubordination, oppression, and extortion to military branch of army services; 21.A20, leg. to consider whether variation in rules of deportment is necessary for army subdept. as indirectly-applying remedy against oppression; A27, military codes and repression of wrongs between functionaries; A49, use of dislocation instruments. See ARMY MINISTER; MILITARY SERVICE
ARRANGEMENT(S): IX.4.A40, fictitious entity—the result of any law or mandate, permanent or transitory; A41, institutions and establishments, as arrangements; A41, defined and distinguished; A61, f. regarding arrangements: melioration-suggestive. See ENTITIES
ARTS AND SCIENCES: VII.4, encouragement to arts and sciences at expense of the indigent not the object of legislator; IX.7.4th.A31, expenditure on fine arts and books as form of loss
ASYLUM: VII.8, asylum to all granted
ATTENDANCE AND NON-ATTENDANCE: VI.18.1–2, leg. sits every day except vacation days (every 7th day); 20.A1–3, arrangements for entry and departure from assembly chamber; A4, remuneration for days attended only; A5, absentation book and publication of record of absences of legislators; A6, arrangements for sickness; A7, suspicion of using sickness as a pretence obviated; A8, withholding remuneration for non-attendance; A11, noninterrupted attendance v. interrupted attendance of legislators discussed; A12–14, effect in mixed monarchies of non-attendance; A15–17, and in English practice; A18, A20–1, and U.S. practice; A19, importance of uninterrupted sittings; 23.A30, notice of non-attendance by deputy and substitute to be posted by election clerk of district; 25.A54–5, effect of pecuniary punishment for non-attendance in leg. discussed in light of other securities; 26.A1, exclusion from leg. by force, fraud, or accident; A2, legislative authority belongs to majority present at meeting; A3, effect on majority where members excluded; A4, responsibility of those involved in exclusion; A5, if wrongful exclusion by member, dislocation by constitutive authority; 27.A27, elicitation process not to conflict with attendance at leg. by deputies and continuation committee; A50, attendance by witnesses at elicitation of evidence by House of Commons not secured; A54, nor by monarch's commissions; pg 534 31.A43, attendance and securities for app. moral apt. of leg. ; A45, and securities for app. active apt. of leg.; VII.1.A2, arrangements for unavoidable absence of legislator from reading legislator's inaugural declaration; 10, attendance by legislator promised in legislator's inaugural declaration; IX.14.A1, ministers' attendance time: in-door and out-door service; A1, in-door and out-door service defined; A2, leg. to determine time devoted to each; A3, attendance of legislators to receive communications from ministers; 19.A11, leg. to apply rules of attendance to each subordinate situation. See REMUNERATION; SELF-SUPPLETIVE FUNCTION
AUDIENCE(S): V.4.A3, audiences of official bodies serve as committees of p.o. trib. See ARCHITECTURE; CHAMBER(S); PUBLIC OPINION TRIBUNAL
AUDIENCE CHAMBER(S): See CHAMBER(S); LEGISLATURE
AUSTRIA: II.A24, England v. Austria, moral responsibility, and p.o. trib.
AUTHORITY(IES): IV.Al, four authorities in the state: constitutive, legislative, administrative, and judiciary. See ADMINISTRATIVE AUTHORITY; CONSTITUTIVE AUTHORITY; JUDICIARY AUTHORITY; LEGISLATURE
BENEFICENCE: See BENEVOLENCE
BENEFIT(S) AND BURDEN(S): IX.1.A2n, defined. See GOOD AND EVIL
BENEVOLENCE: VII.8, beneficence and effective benevolence promised by legislators; IX.19.A14, and remuneration for longevity; 21.A21, A26, negative effective benevolence v. positive effective benevolence and rules of deportment; A21n, benevolence v. beneficence
BIS-SUBDISTRICT(S): See LOCAL HEADMAN; SUBDISTRICT(S)
BOOK(S): See STATISTIC FUNCTION
CALAMITY: VII.2, security against physical calamity as a positive end of government; VIII.10.A6, security against destruction of judicial documents by calamity; IX.25.A34, security against calamity and ex. of power by leg.
CAPITAL: IX.16.45–6, capital v. interest on capital and government funding of instruction; 21.A6, capital and extinction of profit by disclosure, as oppression of inspectees
CENSORIAL FUNCTION: V.5.A2, ex. by p.o. trib.; 6.A2, all members of human species have right to ex. censorial f.; VIII. 12.A1, ex. by p.o. trib. As security for app. apt. of p.m.; IX.25.A3, ex. by p.o. trib. as security for app. apt. of ministers; A30–1, and power of p.o. trib. See PUBLIC OPINION TRIBUNAL
CHAMBER(S): IX.21.A20, administrative functionaries' audience chamber, presence of rules for deportment and incidental complaint book; 25.A10, rules of deportment displayed in functionaries' audience chamber, as security for app. apt. See ARCHITECTURE; AUDIENCE(S); LEGISLATURE
CHANCE: IX.9.A8, use of chance for unexpected visits in ex. of inspective f.; A9, as a security, how best used; 16.A61, use of chance v. choice in examination system; A69n, in English practice; A76, chance and choice used in association. See CHOICE; LOCATION AND DISLOCATION; LOT
CHARACTER INDEX: IX.25.A4, composed of personal stock book, individual service book and loss book, and used as instrument of security for app. apt.; A11, character index and functionary's deportment rules. See APTITUDE
CHECK(S): V.4.A4, public opinion a check to pernicious ex. of power of government; VI.1.A1, power of supreme leg. is unlimited but checked by securities; pg 535 25.A49, securities as checks to p.m.'s power; 27.A14, checks on legislation enquiry judicatory considered; A38, securities as checks applicable to legislation enquiry judicatory; VIII.11.A16, check on p.m.'s report by legislative committee; 12.A1, checks to arbitrary appointments by p.m.; IX.7.2nd.A30, checks on transmission of money; 8.A14, checks on requisitions; 9.A5, inspection visits as checks; A7, finance minister and checks on expenditure; 16.A69n, jury system as check to despotism; 17.A11, checks on mislocation; 20.A12, secret institutions as checks to tyranny; 23.A12, need for suspicion and precaution as checks to delinquency. See SECURITIES
CHOICE: VI.25.12–13, two candidates for leg. required for effective choice; A39, period of non-relocability and choice between 'tried men'; A49, responsibility and freedom of choice of electors; A52–3, temporary non-relocability and freedom of choice; IX.16.A3, choice and location by p.m. in location system; A3, improper choice at peril of p.m.'s reputation; A31, choice and ranking table in location system; A61, use of chance v. choice in examination system; A69n, in English practice; A76, chance and choice used in association; 17.Con.Inst.A1, apt. system and arbitrary power of choice; 19.A22, ministers and choice in filling vacancies; A35, in corrupt government succession by 'official age' better than unrestrained choice; A36, choice v. lot for succession in corrupt government. See CHANCE; LOCATION AND DISLOCATION; LOT; RELOCATION
CLASS(ES): VI.31.27–30, lawyer class in representative democracy; A41n, English practice and professional lawyers of all classes; VII.9, legislator promises impartiality toward individuals and all classes; IX. 16.A52, payment to instructors and to lowest-paid class of labourers; 17.A53, unopulent classes excluded by pecuniary competition; 25.A46, class of persons to whom system of following precedents is well adapted; A47, class divided into two subclasses, mis-employed lawyers, mercantile, and official subclass; unemployed peerage subclass; A48, power-holding class in representative democracy v. mixed monarchy
CLEARNESS: VI.27.A18, A44, clearness as desirable property of evidence; A39, in legislation enquiry report; 31.A44, and securities for app. intellectual apt. of legislators; VII.5, as desirable characteristic of laws; IX.7.6th.A6, of entries in ex. of statistic f. See EVIDENCE; LAW OR MANDATE; MOTION(S); STATISTIC FUNCTION; WRITTEN INSTRUMENT(S)
COLONIES: See DEPENDENCIES
COMMENTATIVE FUNCTION: IX.25.A23, importance of access to register book for ex. of
COMMODATIVE FUNCTION: See ELIMINATIVE FUNCTION
COMMON LAW: See ENGLISH PRACTICE
COMMONWEALTH: IX.15.A35, constitution called a 'commonwealth'; A35, subversion of by arbitrary conferring of factitious dignity
COMMOTION(S): IX.26.A44, popular commotions as cause of loss of public buildings and contents; A46, need in republic to protect public property from popular commotions
pg 536COMPETITION: VI.25.4–5, non-relocation and competition for legislative office; A6–11, examples discussed; A52–3, temporary non-relocability and competition for leg.; VII.8, competition between states and between individuals discussed; IX.15.A6, competition and remuneration of labour; 16.A3, 17.A1–59, pecuniary competition system; 17.A45, competition principle applied to min. price of commodities; A46–7, application to official labour resisted in English practice; 19.A12, and increase of remuneration during office; A31, competition and arrangements in Russia; 23.A15, peculation in competitive situations. See LOCATION AND DISLOCATION
COMPLETENESS: See COMPREHENSIVENESS
COMPREHENSIVENESS: II.A1, greatest happiness of greatest number as allcomprehensive end of constitution; VI.27.A18, A44, comprehensiveness as desirable property of evidence; A39, comprehensiveness in legislation enquiry report; A54, comprehensiveness of evidence elicited by monarch's commission; 31.A44, comprehensiveness in securities for app. intellectual apt. of legislators; VII.2, greatest happiness of greatest number as all-comprehensive end of government; 5, completeness as desirable characteristic of law; VIII. 10.A1, comprehensiveness in registration; IX.7.6th.A6, of entries in ex. Of statistic f. See EVIDENCE; LAW OR MANDATE; MOTION(S); STATISTIC FUNCTION; WRITTEN INSTRUMENT(S)
COMPULSORILY PROCURATIVE FUNCTION: See LOCATION AND DISLOCATION
CONCISENESS: VI.31.A44, in securities for app. intellectual apt. of legislators; VII.5, as desirable characteristic of law. See EVIDENCE; LAW OR MANDATE; MOTION(S); WRITTEN INSTRUMENT(S)
CONDENSATION FUNCTION: VI.27.A39, ex. in preparation of legislation enquiry report. See MANDATE(S); WRITTEN INSTRUMENT(S)
CONFIRMATION FUNCTION: See CONSUMMATIVE FUNCTION
CONSENT: VI.25.A52, consent to temporary non-relocability and suffering; 27.A27, consent and participation in evidence elicitation process v. Attendance at leg.; VII.1.A2, consent and unavoidable absence at legislator's inaugural declaration; 8, grounds for legislator's consent to war; IX.15.A7, consent and liberal expenditure; A25, consent of persons not required for application for entry in public merit register; 16.A77–8, . consent and use of lotteries; 21.A46, consent and transfer of functionaries; 24.A2, consent of leg. and vote of ministers
CONSERVATIVE FUNCTION: See REGISTRATIVE FUNCTION
CONSTITUENT(S): See CONSTITUTIVE AUTHORITY
CONSTITUTIONAL CODE OR CONSTITUTION: I.Ain, first in importance in the Pannomion; VI.1.A13, variable by legislative and constitutive authorities; 2.A2, ordinances of leg. repugnant to constitution, what effect; 25.A16, obstruction to the introduction of code by existing legislators; A20, exclusion of corruption from code; A39, and preparation period; A42, problem of app. apt. when states first founded; Vlln, provision for dissent to code in legislator's inaugural declaration; VII.11, basis of power in people; IX.8.A18, at commencement of code, leg. makes provision for outset supply; 15.A1, leading principles of code enumerated; A35, arbitrary conferring of factitious dignity sufficient to destroy constitution; A36, ultra-concomitant remuneration repugnant to constitution; A39, artificially mislocated remuneration also pg 537repugnant; A45, all arbitrarily conferred reward excluded from code; 16.A3, location by one person as principle of code; 20.A10, code and importance of inspection of public and private institutions; 21.A25, and system of judicial procedure; A32, no insertion of codes of deportment into constitutional code, reasons given; A33, constitutional code and penal code; 25.Ain, use of re-editive v. corrective or directive modes in code; A38, constitutional code and limits to abuse of power in ex. of extraordinary power; A49, acting on precedent is anti-constitutional when by executive and judiciary in opposition to leg. See ANTI-CONSTITUTIONAL OFFENCES; CONSTITUTIVE AUTHORITY; LEGISLATURE; STATE
CONSTITUTIVE AUTHORITY: III.A1, sovereignty in people, ex. by constitutive authority; IV.A1, constitutive authority is one of four authorities in the state; A2, constitutive authority to depute, locate, dislocate, and relocate members of the leg.; A2, not to give individual or specific direction to leg.'s measures; A7, use of word 'supreme' discussed; A7–8, constitutive authority supreme over others; A8, for each authority, a department; V.1.A1, constitutive authority defined; A2, vested in electors of state; A3, females, non-adult males, illiterates, and non-residents excluded; 2. A1, all other authorities subordinate to constitutive authority; A1, immediate v. interventional dislocation by constitutive authority; A2, constitutive authority ex. by locative, dislocative, punifactive fs.; A3–4, location of deputies to leg. and subleg.; A5, dislocative f., in relation to which functionaries exercised; A6, functionaries in relation to whom dislocative f. is ex. within each district; 3.A1, locative f., how ex. in relation to leg.; A2–3, and sublegs.; A4, dislocative f., how ex. In relation to leg.; A5, in relation to subleg.; A6, grounds for dislocation to be clearly stated, fallacies avoided; A7–9, punifactive f. how ex.; VI.1.A5, dependence of leg. on constitutive authority; A9, communication between constituents and deputy; A9, duty of deputy to constituents; A10, duty of deputy where interests of constituents conflict with national interest; A11–12, deputy's duty to public v. duty to constituents; A13, constitution variable by legislative and constitutive authorities; 2.A1, leg. to give execution and effect to the will of constitutive authority to max. happiness of greatest number; A2, constitutive authority and anti-constitutional ordinances of leg.; A3, constitutive authority and enforcement of contracts of leg.; AS, A11, constitutive authority to ex. dislocative and punifactive fs., where breach of public faith in contracts; 21.A1, sittings of leg. are public, p.o. trib. reports to constitutive authority; 23.A14–26, reasons given for suppletive f. belonging to deputy rather than to constitutive authority; 26.A5, constitutive authority and dislocation of members of leg. for wrongful exclusion of other members; VI.27.A27, service to constitutive authority and attendance of deputy v. participation in elicitation process; 28.A7, deprivation of constitutive authority of deputies by service on legislation penal judicatory; 30.A1, constitutive authority and dislocation of members of leg.; 31.A42, and securities for app. apt. of legislators; VII. 11, the people are 'the only legitimate source of power'; 14, legislator but an agent of constituents; VIII.2.A1, constitutive authority and p.m.'s ex. of executive f.; 9.A2, constitutive authority and dislocation of p.m.; 11.A6, constitutive authority and evils of publicity in voting; 12.A1, registration system and constitutive authority and security for app. apt. of p.m.; A1, dislocation by constitutive authority as security for app. apt. of p.m.; IX.18.A6, constitutive authority and dislocation of ministers; 25.A3, as security for app. apt.; A30–1, constitutive authority and pg 538power of p.o. trib.; 26.A8–9, in constitutive authority, greatest need for secrecy in suffrage. See CONSTITUTION; ELECTION CODE; LEGISLATURE; PUBLIC OPINION TRIBUNAL
CONSUMMATIVE FUNCTION: IX.17.A21, 19.A16, ex. in location. See INITIATIVE FUNCTION
CONSUMPTION AUTHORIZING FUNCTION: See ELIMINATIVE FUNCTION
CONTAGION: See CALAMITY
CONTESTED INTERPRETATION REPORTING FUNCTION: IX.24.A5, judges' contested interpretation reporting f. and application to ministers; A6, in every situation subordinate to minister belongs the contested interpretation reporting f. as well as melioration-suggestive f.
CONTINUATION COMMITTEE: VI.20.A25, as remedy for deprivation of benefit of work of preceding legs.; 23.A29, distinctive dress for members of continuation committee discussed; 24.A1, located by leg. at end of session; A2, eligibility for continuation committee; A3, member has right of argumentation and initiation, but not the vote; A4, same remuneration as for deputy; reasons for provision of continuation given: (i) A5, time otherwise lost; (ii) A6, good measures otherwise lost; (iii) A7, time of functionaries otherwise wasted; (iv) A8, information already obtained, otherwise wasted; (v) A9, improvements requiring considerable preparation otherwise prevented; (vi) A10, the shorter the life of the leg., the greater evils of wasted time and information; (vii) A11, experience of legislators enhanced by successive relocation of continuation committee men; (viii) A12, absence of instance of continuation committee in governments, no bar to adoption; (ix) A13, practice in earlier societies; reasons for denying vote to continuation committee: (i) A14, more like ministers than legislators; (ii) A15, not chosen by electors; (iii) A16, number not fixed, effect on voting; (iv) A17, no grounds for objection to mode of location; reasons for leg. locating continuation committee: (i) A18, best judges of app. apt.; (ii) A19, best judges of the number of committee men needed; (iii) A20, committees in general are chosen by the body from which they come; (iv) A21, emblem of Sisyphus explained; 25.A3, continuation committee and relocation; A15, and discontinued relocability; A33, and maintaining app. apt. in leg.; A52–3, and temporary non-relocability; A53n, and evolution of Bentham's idea; 27.A25, members eligible for position as legislation elicitor; A27, elicitation process not to conflict with legislative duties. See LEGISLATION REGARDING FUNCTIONS
CONTRACT(S): VI.2.A3, enforcement of contracts of leg. by constitutive authority; A4, observance of contracts discussed; A5, judicial enforcement of contracts between government and individual of state; A6, between government and foreign state; A7, between government and subject of a foreign state; A8, constitutive authority to ex. dislocative and punifactive fs., where breach of public faith; A9, remedy for wrong done to foreign government; A10, and action of leg.; A11, and constitutive authority; IX.16.77–8, lotteries and contracts; 23.A6–12, provisions in contracts for prevention of peculation
CONVERSATION TUBES: See ARCHITECTURE
CONVICTED LIST: IX.25.A6, as security for app. apt.; A7, headings employed; A8, inserted in office calendar; A9, arrangements for new series when list becomes of inconvenient size
CORRECTIVE FUNCTION: VI.3.A1, A3, ex. by leg. in relation to sublegs.
CORRECTNESS: VI.27.A18, A44, as desirable property of evidence; A39, in pg 539legislation enquiry report; 31.A44, and securities for app. intellectual apt. Of legislators; VII.5, as desirable characteristic of law; VIII.10.A1, in registration; IX.7.6th.A6, of entries in ex. of statistic f.; 25.Ain, corrective and reeditive modes. See EVIDENCE; LAW OR MANDATE; MOTION(S); REEDITIVE MODE; STATISTIC FUNCTION; WRITTEN INSTRUMENT(S)
CORRUPTION: II.A16n, corruption as evil in government; VI.19.A1, ulterior remuneration and extortion v. corruption of legislators; 20.A17, corruption and English practice; 23.A9, absentation, corruption, and self-suppletion; A26, patronage without corruption; 24.A1, corruption of leg. by executive; 25.A8, relocability, stagnation in office, and corruption; A19–27, A46, corruption and undiscontinued relocability; A48, temporary non-relocability system as security against corruption; 27.A49, corruption in House of Commons; A54–5, monarch's commissions in English practice and corruptive influence; VII.4, sources of corruption discussed in legislator's inaugural declaration; VIII.6.A1, ulterior remuneration of p.m. and corruption v. extortion; IX.7.4th.A31, corruption and needless expense; 13.A3, corruption and dislocation of functionaries; 15.A4, remuneration, opulence, and corruption; A7, liberality and corruption; A34, corruption and conferring factitious honour by judges; A34, p.o. trib. not corruptible; A35, arbitrary conferring of factitious dignity, an instrument of corruption; A48, and hereditary titles of honour; A54, remuneration of ministers and extortion v. corruption; 16.A3, power of corruption min. through location system; A24n, corruption at India House; 17.A54, corruption and venality in pecuniary competition; A54, corruption min. in competition system; 17.Con.Inst.Aln, delusion and corruption rather than ignorance keep the subject many in England from changing governments; 19.A31, corruption and Russian practice; A35, to secure app. apt. in corrupt government, succession by official age; A36, ways this form of succession benefits sinister interests of superordinate; A36, allective v. intimidative corruptive influence; A36, use of lot, better to secure app. apt. in succession in corrupt government; 25.A13, gift or remuneration for extra despatch is corruption; A13, corruptingness v. corruptedness; A53, corrupt dependence of aristocracy on monarchy; A58, corruption and military v. civilian procedure in English practice; 26.A8–9, secret suffrage and avoidance of corruption. See APTITUDE; DEPREDATION; ENGLISH PRACTICE; EXPENSE; EXTORTION; GOOD AND EVIL; REMUNERATION; SECURITIES; WASTE
CUSTODITIVE FUNCTION: IX.4.A48, ex. by ministers collectively in regard to things; A48, defined; 7.2nd.A24, and use of mimographical or receptacular mode of registration; 3rd.A15, ex. by keepers; 19.A34, and use of permanent v. temporary functionaries; 23.A14, peculation v. embezzlement and ex. of custoditive f.
DECEPTION: VI.27.17–18, deception in elicitation of evidence; A18, A44, non-deceptiveness as desirable property of evidence; A19–21, securities against deception; VII. 13, no deception in formulating ordinances and in debate promised in legislator's inaugural declaration
DECREE(S): See JUDICIAL DECREES
DEFAMATION: V.6.A2, and ex. of censorial f. by p.o. trib.; A3–4, and free circulation of political tracts
DELAY: VI.23.A11, A19, deputy's substitute and prevention of delay; 24.A5, delay prevented by continuation committee; 27.A17–18, delay, vexation and expense and limits to extraction of evidence by leg.; A28, delay, vexation and expense and arrangements for extraction of evidence; A34, avoiding delay in legislation enquiry; 31.A29, factitious delay, vexation and expense and common law; VII.6, delay in judicial proceedings is equal to a tax; IX. 19.A24, prevention of delay in filling vacancies; 25.A13, remuneration for extra despatch acts as premium for delay in ordinary despatch; A14, prohibition of remuneration for extra despatch acts as security against factitious delay; A58, military procedure and factitious delay; 26.A13–14, delay in communication and architectural arrangements. See EXPENSE; GOOD AND EVIL; VEXATION
DELUSION: VI.24.A8, delusive information without continuation committee; VII.8, 'honour', 'glory', 'dignity'——words of delusion; 13, no delusion in formulating ordinances or in debate; IX.7.4th.A31, expenditure on fine arts and books as instrument of delusion; 17.A55, 'liberality' more suited than 'munificence' for the purpose of delusion; 17.Con.Inst.Aln, delusion and corruption rather than ignorance keep the subject many in England from changing governments. See DIGNITY; HONOUR
DEMERIT REGISTER: IX.25.A6, as instrument of security for app. apt.; A7, headings of entry
DEONTOLOGY: IX.21.A21n, word of Greek origin, used for 'ethics'; A32, private v. political deontology; A32n, deontology defined. See DEPORTMENT
DEPARTMENT(S): IV.A8, for each authority, there is a dept. See AUTHORITY(IES)
DEPENDENCIES: VII.8, dependencies discussed; IX.7.4th.A31, needless expenditure on distant dependencies
DEPORTMENT: IX.20.16–20, rules of deportment of non-functionaries before functionaries; 21.A5–6, rules of deportment and oppression of suitors and inspectees; A20, rules of deportment for functionaries as indirectlyapplying remedies against oppression; A20, rules of deportment for functionaries and suitors displayed in functionaries' audience chambers; A20, rules for functionaries and suitors may diverge on some points; A21, rules of deportment analysed as rules of ethics; A22, and sanctions of penal code; A23, enforceability of rules; A24, and importance of system of judicial procedure; A25, English system of procedure contrasted; A26, enforcement of rules of negative-effective benevolence; A27, military codes as codes of deportment; A28–31, military codes in English practice; A32, reasons for not inserting codes of deportment into constitutional code; 25.A10, rules of deportment as instruments of security for app. apt., displayed in every functionary's audience chamber; A11, insertion of information from character index into functionary's deportment rules; A12, visitor's deportment rules for suitors and inspectors; 26.A21–2, rules of deportment displayed in waiting boxes
DEPREDATION: II.A16n, depredation as form of evil; VI.2.A4, depredation and use of oath by monarch; 27.A37, and secrecy in legislation enquiry judicatory; 31.A28, and lawyer class in representative democracy; A31, A33, pg 541and pure monarchy; A34–5, depredation and pure aristocracy; VII.4, depredation, economy and corruption discussed; 6, depredation and tax on judicial services; 8, 'honour' and 'glory' used for depredation; IX.15.A7, liberality as depredation; A35, unpunishable depredation in English monarchy and destruction of constitution; A46, depredation and hereditary succession; 17.A56, depredation not increased by indigence; A56, most opulent also most voracious; A56–8, reasons given; 25.A47, depredation and peerage; A57, depredation and English justice. See CORRUPTION; ENGLISH PRACTICE; OPPRESSION
DEPUTE: IV.A2, constitutive authority to depute members of leg.; A14, auxiliaries and self-suppletive f.; V.2.A3n, 'deputy' v. 'depute'; A3n, depute defined, examples given; A5, deputes and ex. of dislocative f. by constitutive authority; VI.23.1–32, and ex. of self-suppletive f. by leg.; VIII.2.A5, deputes and ex. of dislocative f. by p.m.; 4.A1, location of depute by p.m. in ex. of self-suppletive f.; A2, depute defined and fs. stated; A3, occasions for assuming power listed; A4, power of principal and depute; A5–6, responsibility of principal for depute; A7, arrangements for location of depute; A8, instrument of location; A9, arrangements for power passing between principal and depute; A10, arrangements for death of principal; A11, dislocability of depute; IX.6.1–13, self-suppletive f. ex. by location of depute by ministers; 17.A9, service as depute may be grounds for preference in location system; A33–4, deputes permanent must be chosen from locable list; A35–6, location instrument for deputes; 19.A21–2, deputes permanent not automatic choices for vacancies in office; 24. A1, depute permanent may ex. legislation-regarding fs. for minister in leg.; A3, minister or depute bound to attend sessions of leg. to answer questions; 25.A3, obligation by ministers to use deputes and be responsible for their apt., as security for app. apt. See SELF-SUPPLETIVE FUNCTION
DEPUTY(IES): I.A3, each district sends one deputy to leg.; A4, each subdistrict, as voting district, sends deputy to subleg.; V.2.A3n, 'deputy' preferred to 'representative', reasons given; A3n, 'deputy' v. 'depute'; VI.1.A9, communication between constituents and deputy; A9, duty of deputy to constituents; A10, duty of deputy where interests of constituents conflict with national interest; A11–12, deputy's duty to public v. duty to constituents; 23.A1, ex. of self-suppletive f.; A2, deputy responsible for substitute; A3, eligibility for location as substitute, other members excluded; A4–6, arrangements for appointment and admission of substitute to assembly chamber; A7–13, reasons given for appointment of depute by each deputy; A14–26, reasons given for suppletive f. given to deputy instead of constitutive authority ; A27, option left to deputy whether deputy or substitute will attend; A30, notice of non-attendance by deputy and substitute to be posted by election clerk of district; A31, in absence of excuse paper, new election arranged; A32, leg. To determine validity of excuse paper; 25.A19–29, deputies and corruption by undiscontinued relocability; A49, deputies and responsibility; 27.A25, deputies eligible as legislation elicitors; A27, elicitation process not to conflict with legislative duties; VIII.3.A7, deputies and ex. of initiative f. by p.m. in relation to leg. See LEGISLATOR'S INAUGURAL DECLARATION; LEGISLATURE; SUBLEGISLATURE(S)
DESIRE AND AVERSION: IX.25.A1, as motives for securities for app. apt.; pg 542 A1, pleasure and pain, as objects of desire and aversion. See PLEASURE AND PAIN
DESPATCH (DISPATCH): IX.19.A20, in filling vacancies among functionaries as security; 25.A13, for extra despatch, gift, or remuneration is corruption; A13, extra despatch defined; A14, inhibition of remuneration for extra despatch acts as security against factitious delay and extortion; A15, in case of urgency, minister to apply to finance minister by remuneration draft; A16, quasi-judicial assertion to establish extra despatch; A17, quasi-judicial assertion defined; A18, extra despatch book, headings of entries; A19, entry from extra despatch book to be included in remuneration draught; A20, examples of remuneration draught, how distributed; A21, signature of finance minister to acknowledge receipt of remuneration draught; A22, if no payment by fixed date, finance minister to issue non-payment excuse and benemeritant may transmit to p.m., a non-payment complaint; A23, importance of publicity emphasized; A24, leg. to arrange for secrecy for extra despatch, where necessary as in time of war; A25, provisions for extra despatch do not apply to all extra service
DESPOTISM: II.A24, and English government; VI.20.A17, 'power without obligation' is despotism; 25.A46, undiscontinued relocability and subversion of representative democracy to despotic monarchy; 31.A22, oriental despots and abuse of power; IX.16.A69n, and English jury system; 17.Con.Inst.A1, establishment of aptitude and dethroned despots; 25.A39, secret and silent despotism v. openly and freely discussed legislation in the use of dispensing power. See ENGLISH PRACTICE; TYRANNY
DIAGRAM(S): IX.7.3rd.A24, limitations on use of. See MIMOGRAPHICAL MODE
DIGNITY AND FACTITIOUS DIGNITY: IV.A14, dignity as remuneration; VI.19.A1, dignity added to remuneration of members of leg.; VI.25.A20, dignity as matter of corruption; 27.A52, factitious dignity and House of Lords; 30.A1, acceptance of factitious dignity from foreign governments, as cause of dislocation of members of leg.; VII.3, appetite for factitious dignity and honour to be avoided by legislators; 4, dignity for nation at expense of indigent not aspect of legislation; 8, factitious dignity not to be received by legislators; VIII.12.A1, dislocation of p.m. for accepting factitious dignity from foreign governments, as security for app. apt.; IX.5.A12, factitious dignity as a form of superiority; 15.A29, factitious dignity repugnant to principles of constitution; A30, instruments for conferring factitious dignity: titles of honour and ensigns of dignity; A31–3, examples given; A34, factitious dignity unsuitable, even if judicially conferred; A35, arbitrary conferring of factitious dignity sufficient to destroy constitution; A47, factitious dignity and artificially extravasated reward; 17.A49, factor in the payment of personal service; 23.A12, factitious dignity, no exemption from suspicion of delinquency; 25.A3, dislocability of ministers for accepting factitious dignity from foreign governments, as security for app. apt. See HONOUR; REMUNERATION; REWARD AND PUNISHMENT
DIRECTION: IV.A2, constitutive authority not to give individual or specific direction to members of leg.; A3, legislative authority to give on occasion individual direction to chiefs of administrative and judiciary depts.; IX.5.A4, power of, necessary to subordination; A25, where necessity of direction, rank in scale of subordination has place; A26, account-giving, subordination, and need of direction; A27, examples given; A28–30, distance between functionaries, subordination, and direction; 21.A4, abuse of power of direction pg 543and oppression; 25.A32, information about inaptitude of subordinates and directive power of ministers. See DIRECTIVE FUNCTION
DIRECTIVE FUNCTION: VI.3.1–2, ex. by leg. in relation to sublegs.; VIII. 2.A2, ex. by p.m. in relation to administrative authority; IX.4.A44, ex. by ministers collectively with regard to deputes or subordinates; A49, applicative v. directive f.; A54, directive and inspective fs.; 5.A4, f. ex. in scale of subordination; A5–6, where present, directive f. combined with power to ex. Suspensive and temporarily suppletive fs. ; A17, directive power and accountableness; 19.A2, subordinate subject to ex. of directive f. by superordinates; A29–31, ex. of directive f., military v. non-military service; 20.A4, directive f. and inspection; A10, with private institutions separation of inspective f. from directive and dislocative fs.; A14, insubordination of subordinate functionary based on non-compliance with direction of superordinate; A25, non-compliance of subordinate to direction of superordinate, powers given; 21.A35, abuse of ex. of directive f., remedies against oppression. See DIRECTION
DIRECTIVE MODE: VI.29.3–4, and emendation; A3–6, IX.25.A in, directive or corrective mode v. reeditive. See REEDITIVE MODE
DISLOCATIVE FUNCTION: V.2.A2, ex. by constitutive authority; A5, functionaries in relation to whom ex.; A6, functionaries in relation to whom ex. from within each district; 3.A4, how ex. by constitutive authority in relation to leg.; A5, in relation to subleg.; A6, dislocative f. and avoidance of fallacies; VI.2.A2, ex. by electors when leg. passes anti-constitutional ordinance; A8, ex. by constitutive authority where breach of faith over contracts; VIII.2.A5, ex. by p.m. in relation to ministers; IX.4.A44, ex. by ministers collectively in relation to persons; A44, A52, dislocative v. eliminative fs.; 5.A4, ex. in scale of subordination; 20.A10, with private institutions separation of inspective f. from dislocative and directive fs.; 21.A36, remedies against oppression by abuse of dislocative f.: directly applying v. indirectly applying; 25.A26, dislocative power and responsibility of ministers for subordinates; A32, dislocative power of ministers. See CONSTITUTIVE AUTHORITY; ELECTION CODE; LOCATION AND DISLOCATION; LOCATIVE FUNCTION
DISPUNITIVE FUNCTION: IX.15.A9, arbitrarily conferred, neither good nor evil
DISSENT: VIIn, VII.1.3–4, provision for in legislator's inaugural declaration; A5, dissent to essence of declaration and arrangements for new election
DISTRICT(S): I.A3, territory of state divided into districts which serve as election districts; A3, one deputy to leg. from each district; A3, each district is territory of subleg.; A3, district is territory of appellate judicatory; A3, districts listed; A4, each district divided into subdistricts; IV.A9, each district has a subleg. under the leg.; A12, one seat in leg. for each district; V.2.A3, constitutive authority divided into election districts, ex. locative f.; A6, dislocative f. ex. by each district; VI.22.2–3, distance between districts and leg. and term of service of members of leg. See CONSTITUTIVE AUTHORITY; SUBDISTRICT(S)
DISTRICT MINISTER(S): See SUBMINISTER(S)
DISTRICT PRIME MINISTER(S): See SUBPRIME MINISTER(S)
DISTURBANCE: VI.16, security of leg. against disturbance by members; 30.A1, disturbance of assembly as cause of dislocation of members of leg.; 31.A43, security against disturbance of legislative meetings as security for app. moral apt.; VIII.3.A9, message from p.m. v. communication through minister to secure freedom from disturbance of leg.; IX.20.A24, leg. to determine which grades to have security against disturbance by suitors, inspectees and evidence holders
DOMAIN MINISTER: IX.2.A1, serves under p.m.; 9.A7, joint visits and ex. Of inspective f.; 16.A15, requisite talents for position. See DOMAIN SUBDEPARTMENT; MINISTER(S)
DOMAIN SUBDEPARTMENT: IX.2.A10, potentially joined with interior communication subdept.; 9. A4, offices to be visited in ex. of inspective f.; 16.A15, talent requiring situations and requisite talents, examples given. See DOMAIN MINISTER
DONATIVE FUNCTION: See ELIMINATIVE FUNCTION
DUTY AND OBLIGATION: II.A16n, reward, punishment, and obligations; V.5.A5, moral v. legal obligation for functionaries and non-functionaries to ex. statistic f.; 6.A2, better defamation than breach of official duty; A3, restrictions on publications, breach of duty; VI.1.A9, duty of deputy to constituents; A10, duty of deputy where interests of constituents conflict with national interest; A11–12, deputy's duty to public v. duty to constituents; 20.A17, power without obligation is despotism; A18–23, duty and obligation in U.S. legislative practice; 22.A1, term of service and performance of duty of legislators; 25.A20, ease v. duty in monarchy; 28.A7, duty of legislators and membership of legislation penal judicatory; VII.3, appetite for ease v. duty; 4, neglect of duties and dutiless offices, as corruption and waste; 5, publicity to laws and obligations of citizens; 10, obligation of attendance by legislators; 12, duties of members of leg., whole time occupation; VIII.4.A 1, 12.A1, p.m.'s obligation to locate depute as security for app. apt.; IX.4.7–9, obligation as fictitious entity; A7–9, obligations v. rights; 5.A17–18, obligations of subordinates to ex. statistic f.; A20, obligation to transfer money; 6.A1, A10, obligation of ministers to ex. self-suppletive f.; 7.4th.A30, entries in loss book arranged to avoid insincerity while fulfilling obligation to make entries; 11. A10–14, obligation to furnish information; 16.A12–14, location system and apt fulfilment of duties; 17.A42, locating functionary's breach of duty; 19.A22, obligation of ministers in filling vacancies to be compatible with responsibility; A23–6, minister has power but not obligation to repeat qualification examination; A27, pecuniary competition may be held, but not obligatory, in filling vacancies; 21.A13, power and obligation of judges regarding oppression; 25.A3, obligations of ministers toward deputes, as security for app. apt.; 26.A48, duty of monarchs noted. See RIGHT(S)
EDUCATION MINISTER: IX.2.A1, serves under p.m.; 9.A7, joint visits and ex. of inspective f. See EDUCATION SUBDEPARTMENT; MINISTER(S)
EDUCATION SUBDEPARTMENT: IX.2.A10, potentially joined with indigence relief subdept.; IX.9.A4, offices to be visited in ex. of inspective f.; 20.A13, private institutions which may be subject to inspection, examples given. See EDUCATION MINISTER
EJECTIVE FUNCTION: See ELIMINATIVE FUNCTION
ELECTION CLERK: VII.1.A1, notification of election by election clerk
ELECTION CODE: I.A4, each subdistrict a voting district; V.1.A2, constitutive pg 545authority and election code; 3.A1, election code and ex. of locative f. by constitutive authority in relation to leg.; A2–3, and sublegs.; VI.4–17, election code incorporated; 22.A4, and arrangements for elections; VIII.8.A2, and secret election of p.m.; 11.A6, and evil of publicity of secret vote. See LEGISLATURE
ELECTION DISTRICTS: See DISTRICTS; ELECTION CODE; LEGISLATURE
ELECTION DISTRICT OFFICE: VII.1.A1, and legislator's inaugural declaration
ELECTION MINISTER: V.3.A4, election minister and the ex. of dislocative f. by constitutive authority; A8, and ex. of punifactive f. by constitutive authority; VI.20.A5, and publication of absences of legislators at time of general election; 22.A4, and arrangements for elections; IX.2.A1, serves under p.m.; 5.A33, minister's subdept. needs, as subordinates, election clerks and vote-receiving clerks only; 9.A7, joint visits in ex. of inspective f.; 26.A17–18, as not necessarily subject to direction of p.m., no need for contiguous offices. See ELECTION SUBDEPARTMENT; MINISTER(S)
ELECTION SUBDEPARTMENT: IX.9.A4, offices to be visited in ex. of inspective f. See ELECTION MINISTER
ELICITATIVE FUNCTION (EVIDENCE ELICITATIVE FUNCTION): VI.27.A3, ex. by legislation enquiry judicatory in obtaining evidence; A4, how connected to imperative f.; A5, desirable, though impractical, for both fs. to be performed by same person; A6, factors determining leg.'s undertaking ex. of elicitation f.; A11, evidence elicitative f. and procedure code; A39, elicitative f. and ex. of methodization, condensation, and application fs.; A50, importance of House of Commons v. judiciary in English practice in ex. of evidence elicitative f.; IX.21.A16, special judges applying remedies against oppression have no evidence elicitation power. See EVIDENCE; EXTRACTIVE FUNCTION; INFORMATION ELICITATIVE FUNCTION; LEGISLATION ENQUIRY JUDICATORY
ELIMINATION: IX.4.A53, submodes of elimination listed. See ELIMINATIVE FUNCTION
ELIMINATIVE FUNCTION: IX.4.A52, ex. by ministers collectively in regard to things; A44, A52, eliminative v. dislocative fs.; A53, fs. corresponding to submodes of elimination: consumption-authorizing, venditive, donative, mercede-locative, commodative, ejective; 23.A14, peculation and ex. of eliminative f. See ELIMINATION
EMPTIVE FUNCTION: See PROCURATIVE FUNCTION
ENDS AND MEANS: I.A in, means and ends in constitutional code and remainder of Pannomion; II.A1, end in view of constitution, greatest happiness of greatest number; A2, means employed, max. apt. and min. expense; A8, evil as a means in relation to greatest happiness principle; A10, pleasure as end and means; V.5.A6, end of greatest happiness principle and amendments to code; A6, direct v. collateral ends of justice; VII.2, all-comprehensive end of government v. specific and direct ends, positive and negative; IX.1.A1, max. good and min. evil as ends in view; 1.A1, universal end, greatest happiness of greatest number; A2, main end, max. good v. collateral end, min. evil; A3, importance of collateral end; 3.A23, end, greatest happiness of greatest number v. subends (or means), max. apt., min. expense; 7.1st.A2–5, statistic f., ends in view——max. good, min. evil; 17.A47, opposite ends substituted for greatest happiness principle; 19.A10, term of service, ends in view; 21.A26, pg 546rules of deportment and ends of justice; 26.A1, ends in view and importance of architecture; A2, main ends: max. good, min. evil; A3, collateral ends—reduction of delay, vexation, and expense. See APTITUDE; EXPENSE; GOOD AND EVIL; HAPPINESS; MAXIMIZE AND MINIMIZE PRINCIPLES; RULES
ENGLISH PRACTICE: I.A6(inst.diss.), 'mayor' and fs. of local headman; A6(inst.diss.), 'parish' and tri-subdistrict; A6(inst.diss.), English terminology and territorial divisions; II.A16n, in England, expense max. rather than min.; A24, moral responsibility and English government: 'monarchico-aristocratical despotism, with a spice of anarchy'; V.2.A3n, 'deputy' v. 'representative' and English practice; 4.A4, public opinion as a system of law v. English common law; VI.20.A8, in England corporal punishment or death for soldier punished as deserter; A15–16, uses of prorogation and adjournment in English practice to serve interests of monarchy and aristocracy; A17, non-attendance in House of Commons; A24, architectural arrangements and exclusion of observers from judiciary; 25.A7, elections Without competition: (i) East India Company, (ii) Bank of England; A8, (iii) City of London Common Council; A11, (iv) House of Commons; A35, House of Lords, experience and apt.; A47, perpetual non-dislocability and English rump parliament; A51, liberty of press in England; 27.A1in, use of word 'examinant'; A24, 'grand inquest of the nation' used to designate House of Commons; A39, use of word 'report'; A41–56, English practice and eliciting evidence; A43–4, House of Commons, object in view and mode of enquiry; A45–8, House of Commons v. Judiciary on rules of evidence; A49, good aspects of House of Commons v. judiciary; A50, impotence of House of Commons in ex. of evidence elicitation f. discussed; A51, House of Lords v. House of Commons in use of oaths; A52, enquiries initiated by House of Lords; A53, House of Commons committees v. monarch's commissions and reform and improvement; A54, powers of monarch's commission to elicit evidence deficient; A55, composition of monarch's commission discussed; A56, suppression of interrogatories and names of interrogators in reports in English practice; 31.A18, English judges acting as legislators; A29, A39–40, common law and resistance to securities for app. apt.; A29, English practice and the lawyer class in representative democracy; A30, and in England; A34–5, British India and securities for app. apt.; A36–41, mixed monarchy and securities for app. apt.; A40n, English judicial practice and Bentham's 'Indications respecting Lord Eldon'; IX.3.A11, 'board' defined; A12–13, use of boards and app. apt.; A22–38, use of boards in English executive depts. examined; A27, location and dislocation of cabinet by monarch; A27n, size of cabinet and other boards; A27n, grades of power in cabinet; A32, in English practice administration v. judiciary in location and dislocation; A34–6, self-judication principle in English practice; 4.A10, distinction between realty and personalty, source of confusion; A33, 'rule' applied with confusion to transitory and permanent mandates; A33, 'order' added to 'rule'; A34–5, rules, orders and payment of fees in English practice; A36, 'mandate' not employed in English practice; 5.A37, A40, English army and navy: large number in highest grades, and max. of expense; IX.7. 2nd.A22n, Paper Office in English practice; A25n, stowage of articles sent a distance; 4th.A20n, English navy and loss of money in fabrication projects extended over many years; 6th.A5n, use of Latin abbreviations by clerk ofthe pell; A5n, Queen's College, Oxford bookkeeping; 10.A2, in English practice, 'information' used in administrative branch and 'evidence' in judiciary; pg 547 A22–3, no comprehensive system for furnishing information; A25, information from distant dependencies deficient; 11.A13, obligation to disclose information spontaneously in cases of high treason; 16.A24n, East India Company, method of voting; A25n, examinations at Woolwich Academy; A69n, chance v. choice in English practice, especially in jury trials; 17.A45, general opinion that price of commodities, including labour, should be min. by competition; A46, reluctance of statesmen to apply competitive principle to their own labour; A47, why at present the expense of official labour is max. and apt. min.; A48, especially where education, remuneration and location are in the hands of ruling few; A49, House of Commons and justices of the peace: pecuniary competition v. gratuitous service; A55, patronage and corruption in City of London; A56–9, arguments against economy in English practice; 17.Con.Inst.Aln, delusion and corruption rather than ignorance used to prevent change of government by subject many ; 21.A4, 'non-user' in English law; A25, system of procedure v. English practice; A28, Articles of War and Mutiny Act—as codes of deportment; A29–30, military courts, v. ordinary courts and the ends of justice; 22.A5–6, extortion and fraudulence combined in English judicature; 25.A50, use of courts martial and military enquiry courts; A51, arbitrary dislocability mixed with virtual undislocability in non-military subdepartments; A52, King's Bench ineffectual; A53, judge and jury system corrupt and evidence arrangements exclude all but willing testimony ; A54, p.o. trib. checks oppression in spite of law; A55–6, purchase of justice in English practice; A57, no security against oppression in English practice; A58, military procedure superior to judicial practice; 26.A20n, English practice and Panopticon plan. See MIXED MONARCHY; MONARCHY
ENTITIES: IX.4.A4, real and fictitious; A5, real entities comprised of persons and things; A6, fictitious entities comprised of fictitious persons and things; A7, fictitious entities called by lawyers 'things incorporeal'; A7–9, fictitious entities: obligations and rights; A10, immovables and movables; A11, movables at large and money; A12, fictitious entities as noticed: occurrences; A13, states; A14, interior and exterior; A15, important and unimportant; A16–17, relevant; A18, written instruments; A40, arrangements defined as fictitious entities; A41, institutions and establishments defined as fictitious entities
EQUALITY: VII.2, max. equality as an end of government; IX.16.A25n, modes of choice where candidates are equal; 17.A53, equality subordinate to security, or society cannot exist
EVENTUALLY EMEND ATIVE FUNCTION: IX.12.A4, included in the melioration-suggestive f.; A4, how ex.; 24.A5, judges' eventually emendative f. And ministers securing Pannomion from deterioration
EVIDENCE: VI.27.1–6, legislation enquiry judicatory and the eliciting of evidence; A7, preappointed evidence defined; A8–9, examples given; A10, oral v. epistolary evidence; A11, active v. passive elicitation; A12, sources of evidence distinguished; A16, self-condemning evidence discussed; A17, limits to extraction of evidence discussed; A18, desirable properties of evidence discussed; A19–21, securities against deception by falsehood; A30–31, confrontation in gathering evidence, occasions and purposes; A31, counter-evidence defined; A41, regularly v. occasionally elicited evidence; A42–56, English practice in eliciting evidence; A44, desirable properties in evidence: appositeness, clearness, correctness, impartiality, all-comprehensiveness, non-redundance, pg 548instructiveness, and non-deceptiveness; A48, exclusionary rules of evidence in English judicial practice; A50–1, use of oath in English practice; VIII.10.A5, use of manifold writing system and evidence; IX.10.A2, A8, evidence v. information; 16.A20–1, evidence and mode of procedure in qualification judicatory; 21.A7, oppression of evidence holders; A20, securities for clearness, correctness, relative completeness in evidence as indirectly-applying remedy against oppression; A53, A58, problems of exclusion of all but willing witnesses in English practice; 26.A37, problem of false evidence. See LEGISLATION ENQUIRY JUDICATORY; PROCEDURE; PROCEDURE CODE; STATISTIC FUNCTION
EVIDENCE ELICITATION COMMITTEE(S): See LEGISLATION ENQUIRY JUDICATORY
EVIDENCE HOLDER: VI.27.A12, IX.20.A5, defined; A7, and quasi-insubordination; A22, remedy for non-compliance of evidence holder; A24, leg. to determine which grades to have security against disturbance and non-compliance by evidence holders; 21.A4, evidence holders as oppressees; A7, examples given; A20, evidence holders and use of incidental complaint book
EVIL: See GOOD AND EVIL
EXAMINATION(S): See LOCATION AND DISLOCATION
EXCLUSION (FROM OFFICE): VI.26.A1, exclusion from leg. by force, fraud, or accident; A2, legislative authority belongs to majority present at meeting; A3, effect on majority where members wrongly excluded; A4, responsibility of members involved in exclusion; A5, exclusion and dislocation by constitutive authority; VI.27.A27, participation in elicitation process and virtual exclusion from office; 31.A42, wrongful exclusion and securities for app. apt. of leg. See ATTENDANCE AND NON-ATTENDANCE; LEGISLATURE
EXECUTIVE: IV.A6, consists of administrative and judiciary depts.; VI.1.A5, dependence on legislative authority; A6, where non-performance or inaptitude, leg. can take over fs. of executive
EXECUTIVE FUNCTION: V.5.A3, ex. by p.o. trib.; 6.A1, all members of human species have right to ex. executive f.; VIII.2.A1, ex. by p.m.
EXEMPLAR(S): VI.27.A8, as examples of preappointed evidence; VIII.2.A15, exemplars and manifold writing system; A15n, exemplars v. copies and transcripts; 4.A8, exemplars and instruments of location of p.m.'s deputes; 10.A2–4, exemplars and manifold writing mode; A6, and security against destruction of judicial documents; IX.8.A22, and issuance of procuration mandates; 12.A5, and ex. of eventually emendative f.; 17.A10, exemplars of location instrument; A36, of deputation instrument; 21.A73–6, and record of judicatories to obviate oppression; 25.A20, exemplars of remuneration draught, how distributed
EXERTION: IX.16.47–8, remuneration and exertion of instructors in location system; A49, extra-remuneration and motives for exertion; A61, use of chance as inducement to exertion in examination; 17.A52, unopulence as cause of exertion and apt.; A59, apt., exertion and money
EXPENSE: I.A6(inst.diss.), expense and number of divisions of territory discussed; A6(inst.diss.), expense of time wasted on long journeys to government offices; II.A2, min. of expense, means to greatest happiness; A3, included in expenditure is punishment as well as reward; A12, need to min. Expenditure in reward and punishment; A16n, often max. under governments by emphasizing reward rather than punishment; A17, principles to establish app. apt. and min. of expense; VI.23.A19, A22, expense caused by election of deputy's pg 549substitute v. appointment by deputy; A21, expense caused by election of substitute at end of session; 27.A17–18, A28, delay, vexation and expense and extraction of evidence by leg.; A48, expense max. in English judicial practice; A55, expense and monarch's commissions in English practice; 31.A29, delay, vexation and expense and common law; VII.2, min. of expense as negative end of government; 4, expense and government economy; 6, expense and provision of judicial services; 8, no addition to opulence of one state at the expense of another; 8, expense of armaments is robbery; 11, power of leg., created at expense of people; VIII.10.2–3, A5, expense and manifold writing mode; 11.A3, A9, good of publicity v. evil of expense; A5–6, evil of publicity and evil of expense; 12.A1, IX.25.A23, factor of expense in publication system a consideration in securities for app. apt.; IX.3.A14, many-seatedness and expense; 7.2nd.A24, expense min. by mimographical mode of registration; 10.A12, consideration of expense and the supply of information; A25, expense of subject many and information from dependencies; 15.A1, expense min. leading principle of const.; A3–6, min. expense as a way of max. apt.; A44, naturally extravasated remuneration, no expense to community; A46, v. artificially extravasated reward, expense to community; 16.A44–7, government v. individual expense for instruction; 17.A43, expense of the community when pecuniary competition principle sacrificed to patronage; A47, expense of official labour max. in English practice; A49, pecuniary competition v. gratuitous service; A55, pernicious expense the result of association of liberality and merit; 19.A12–13, no increase in remuneration for length of service; A14, or longevity; A24, no additional expense in repetition of qualification examination; A26, decline of those in pecuniary competition, increase in expense; A38, augmentation of emolument, increase in expense; 21.A29, wealth of lawyers at expense of community; 25.A3, min. of expense and securities for app. apt.; A43, common law and expense of time and thought; A57–8, expense of justice in English practice; 26.A20n, expense and rejection of Panopticon plan in England; A38, expense in providing living accommodation for ministers and families discussed. See DELAY; GOOD AND EVIL; MAXIMIZATION AND MINIMIZATION; REMUNERATION; REWARD AND PUNISHMENT; VEXATION
EXPERIENCE: VI.25.32–5, experience v. app. apt. and reason for undiscontinued relocability; A37, experience and elections, why no perpetual nonrelocability; A53n, experience and evolution of Bentham's thoughts on relocation; 31.A42, experience and securities for app. apt. of leg.; VIII.8.A6, experience and instruction from employment of secret and open voting; IX.3.A31, experience and number in office
EXTORTION: VI.19.A1, VIII.6.A1, extortion v. corruption; VI.27.A55, extortion and English judicial practice; IX.20.A1, legislator to consider applicability of arrangements for obviation of extortion to military branch of army and navy services; 21.A2, oppression v. extortion; 22.A1, extortion defined; A2, when committed; A3, extortion and oppression may be combined; A4, applicable remedies; A5–6, extortion and fraudulence combined in English judicial practice; 23.A3, extortion as a mode of peculation; 25.A14, inhibition of remuneration for extra despatch as security against extortion. See CORRUPTION; ENGLISH PRACTICE; PECULATION; REMUNERATION
EXTRACTIVE FUNCTION: IX.10.A8, included in information elicitative f.; 11.A8, ex. by a number of persons at the same time; 16.A62, correspondent pg 550f. of examiners to responses by examinees. See ELICITATIVE FUNCTION; INFORMATION ELICITATIVE FUNCTION
FABRICATIVE FUNCTION: See PROCURATIVE FUNCTION
FACTITIOUS DIGNITY: See DIGNITY AND FACTITIOUS DIGNITY
FACTITIOUS HONOUR: See HONOUR, NATURAL AND FACTITIOUS
FALLACIES: V.3.A6, ex. of dislocative f. by constitutive authority and avoidance of fallacies; VII. 13, use of table of fallacies; IX.17.Con.Inst.A2, fallacies employed to prevent introduction of instruction system; A2.19.A31n, and distinction between theory and practice
FAMINE: See CALAMITY
FEDERATIVE OR FEDERAL GOVERNMENT: VI.3.A5, relation between leg. and sublegs. See LEGISLATURE; SUBLEGISLATURE(S)
FEMALE(S): V.1.A3, excluded from suffrage; 4.A2, but included in p.o. trib.
FEW AND MANY: (i) Opulent or wealthy few and unopulent or indigent many. I.A6(inst.diss.), V.6.A3, VII.4, IX.4.A34, 7.4th.A31; (ii) Ruling or influential few and subject many: II.A23, VI.31.17–20, A41, VII.8, IX.10.24–5, 15.A37, 17.A45–6, A48, 17.Con.Inst.Aln, 25.A43; (iii) General: VIII.11.A6, IX.19.A14, happiness of few at expense of many; 25.A49, distinguished few and comparative many
FIELDS OF SERVICE, LOGICAL AND LOCAL: (i) Logical field of service: I.A6(inst.diss.), and functionaries inferior to local headman; IV.A11, supreme leg., sublegs., administrative depts. and logical field of service; VI.1.A1, logical field of service of supreme leg. ; VIII.1.2–4, p.m.'s logical field of service; A4, minister's logical field of service; 2.A1–3, A5, A8, p.m.'s fs. within logical field of service; IX.2.A4, 'subdepartment' and 'minister' and logical field of service; (ii) Local field of service: I.A6(inst.diss.), local field of service of local headmen; IV.A11, supreme leg., sublegs., administrative depts. and local field of service; VI.1.A1, local field of service of supreme leg.; VIII.1.A1, p.m.'s local field of service coextensive with leg.; (iii) In general: VI.28.A9, leg. Not to act as appellate judicatory; A10, exceptions discussed; VII. 12, encroachment by leg. on fields of service of subordinate authorities; IX. 19.A1, leg. To allot to subordinates in subdepts. grades with distinctive fields of service and fs. See FUNCTION(S)
FINANCE MINISTER: IX.2.A1, serves under p.m.; 5.A31, all functionaries accountable to, but not subordinates of; 9.A7, joint visits and ex. of inspective f.; A7, acts as a check on expenditure of other subdepts.; 15.A57, cares for indemnification of ministers for inspection visits; 16.A15, requisite talents for position; 25.A15, application to finance minister by remuneration draught for remuneration for extra despatch in cases of urgency; A20, exemplar of remuneration draught to finance minister; A21, signature of finance minister to acknowledge receipt of remuneration draught; A22, finance minister to issue non-payment excuse if he fails to pay for extra despatch by fixed date. See FINANCE SUBDEPARTMENT; MINISTER(S)
FINANCE SUBDEPARTMENT: IX.2.A10, potentially joined with trade subdept.; IX.9.A4, offices to be visited in ex. of inspective f.; 16.A15, talent requiring situations and requisite talents, examples given. See FINANCE MINISTER
FORCE(PHYSICAL): VI.26.1–5, and exclusion from leg.; IX.20.A21, use of. See INDUCEMENT AND COERCION; REWARD AND PUNISHMENT
FOREIGN GOVERNMENT(S): VI.30.A1, acceptance of office or honour from pg 551foreign government, as cause of dislocation of members of leg.; VIII.12.1, dislocation of p.m. for accepting office, gift, honour, dignity from foreign government as security for app. apt.; IX.25.A3, dislocability of ministers upon accepting office, honour, gift from foreign government, as security for app. apt. See CONTRACT(S): DIGNITY AND FACTITIOUS DIGNITY; HONOUR, NATURAL AND FACTITIOUS; INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS
FOREIGN RELATION MINISTER: IX.2.A1, serves under p.m.; 9.A7, joint visits in ex. of inspective f.; 16.A15, requisite talents for position. See FOREIGN RELATION SUBDEPARTMENT; MINISTER(S)
FOREIGN RELATION SUBDEPARTMENT: VIII.11.A6–7, and evils of publicity; A15–17, and time limits on secrecy; IX.9.A4, offices to be visited in ex. of inspective f. ; 16.A15, talent requiring situations and requisite talents, examples given; 17.A23, A29–30, need for temporarily initiative location. See FOREIGN RELATION MINISTER
FRANCE: I.A6(inst.diss.), 'maire' and functions of local headman; A6(inst.diss.), French terminology and territorial divisions; II.A24, p.o. trib. and England v. France; VI.25.A10, chamber of deputies and election with competition; IX.26.A20n, Panopticon plan in France
FRAUD: VI.26.A1–5, and exclusion from leg.
FREEDOM (LIBERTY): V.6.A3, freedom of speech; A5, freedom of opinion; VI.25.A49, A52, relocation of members of leg. and freedom of choice; A50, liberty of the press and p.o. trib.; VIII.3.A9, freedom of legislative assembly from disturbance; IX.16.A24n, liberty of suffrage professed, but not practiced in East India Company; 16.A35, liberty of interrogation regarding moral apt. of candidates for location; 17.A47, free and unrestrained competition favoured; 19.A24, liberty to take qualification examination; 26.A8, secret suffrage preserves liberty of suffrage
FRUGALITY: IV.A14, frugality not diminished by ex. of self-suppletive f.; VIII.11.A3, max. publicity and max. frugality; IX.16.A47, max. apt. and frugality of instructors; 17.A53, frugality-maximizing principle and pecuniary competition; 17.Con.Inst.A3, use of frugality as excuse to exclude foreign instructors; 23.A13, publicity limited by frugality
FUNCTION(S): V.2.A2, constitutive authority ex. locative, dislocative, and punifactive fs.; 5.A1, fs. of p.o. trib.: statistic; A2, censorial; A3, executive; A4, melioration-suggestive; VI.3.A1–4, leg. to ex. directive, corrective and arbitrative fs. over sublegs.; 27.A3, leg. to ex. evidence elicitative f.; A4, preparatory to ex. of imperative f.; A5–6, desirable though impracticable, for elicitative and imperative fs. to be performed by same person; A39, methodization, condensation, and application fs. ex. in legislation enquiry report; VIII.2.A1, p.m.'s fs.: executive; A2, directive; A3, locative; A5, dislocative; A8, imperative; 3.A3–4, p.m.'s fs. ex. in sending messages to leg.: informative; A5, indicative; A6–7, initiative; A10, statistic; 4.A1–9, p.m. ex. self-suppletive f.; IX.4.A1, fs. v. operations; A2ff., subject matter of fs., distinctions to be made; A3, fs. designated by names or more ample descriptions; A13, registrative f. concerned with 'states' and 'motions' ; A13, registrative f. composed of minutative, conservative, publicative fs.; A44, fs. ex. by ministers collectively regarding persons: locative, self-suppletive, directive, dislocative, conductive, compulsorily procurative; A45–6, things: procurative, including emptive, conductive, fabricative, requisitive, transreceptive, transmissive, retroacceptive, retro transmissive; A47, requisitive v. procurative fs.; A48, custoditive; A49, applicative; A50, reparative; A51, transformative; A52–3, eliminative, pg 552including consumption authorizing, venditive, donative, mercede locative, commodative, ejective; A54, inspective; A55, visitative; A56, persons, things, money, occurrences: statistic; A57, registrative; A58, publicative; A59, officially informative; A60–1, persons, things, money, instruments of statistication, registration, and publication, ordinances, arrangements: melioration suggestive; A65–70, fs. liable to be competitive, listed; 5.A4–6, modes of power necessary to subordination: directive f., suspensive f., dislocative f., punifactive f., suppletive f.; 10.A8, information elicitative f. and extractive f. ; A16, officially informative f. and information receptive f.; 11.A8, ex. of extractive f.; 12.A1–4, included in melioration suggestive f. are: indicative, ratiocinative, eventually emendative fs.; 15.A9, arbitrary remuneration and dispunitive f.; 17.A21, 19.A16, initiative and consummative fs. ex. in location; 19.A1, leg. to allot subordinates in subdepts.—grades with fields of service and fs.; 21.A17, fs. of judges in applying direct remedies against oppression; 23.A14, malpractice in ex. of procurative, reparative, eliminative, venditive fs. with respect to land, buildings, vessels and goods more important than malpractice in ex. of receptive, custoditive, and transmissive fs. with respect to money; 24.A1, ex. by ministers in leg.: argumentative f., initiative f., and responsive f.; A2, but not votative f. ; A5, judges' contested interpretation reporting f., eventually emendative f., and sistitive f. applied to ministers; A6, subordinates to minister ex. contested interpretation f. as well as melioration suggestive f.; A7, leg. to decide who ex. preinterpretative f. ; A8, and sistitive f. ; 25.A23, importance of access to register book for ex. Of lective, inspective, commentative, and melioration suggestive fs. See these functions APPLICATION; APPLICATIVE; ARBITRATIVE; ARGUMENTATIVE; CENSORIAL; COMMENTATIVE; COMMODATIVE; COMPULSORILY PROCURATIVE; CONDENSATION; CONDUCTIVE; CONSERVATIVE; CONSUMPTION AUTHORIZING; CONTESTED INTERPRETATION AUTHORIZING; CORRECTIVE; CUSTODITIVE; DIRECTIVE; DISLOCATIVE; DISPUNITIVE; DONATIVE; EJECTIVE; ELICITATIVE; ELIMINATIVE; EMPTIVE; EVENTUALLY EMENDATIVE; EXECUTIVE; EXTRACTIVE; FABRICATIVE; IMPERATIVE; INDICATIVE; INFORMATION ELICITATIVE; INFORMATION RECEPTIVE; INFORMATIVE; INITIATIVE; INSPECTIVE; LECTIVE; LEGISLATION REGARDING; LOCATIVE; MELIORATION SUGGESTIVE; MERCEDE-LOCATIVE; METHODIZATION; MINUTATIVE; OFFICIALLY INFORMATIVE; OPINATIVE; PREINTERPRET ATIVE; PROCURATIVE; PUBLICATIVE; PUNIFACTIVE (PUNITIVE); RATIOCINATIVE; RECEPTIVE; REGISTRATIVE; REPARATIVE; REQUISITIVE; RESPONSIVE; RETROACCEPTIVE; RETROTRANSMISSIVE; SELF-SUPPLETIVE; SISTITIVE; STATISTIC; SUPPLETIVE; SUSPENSIVE; TRANSFERENTIAL; TRANSFORMATIVE; TRANSMISSIVE; TRANSRECEPTIVE; VENDITIVE; VISITATIVE; VOTATIVE. See also CONSTITUTIVE AUTHORITY; PUBLIC OPINION TRIBUNAL; LEGISLATURE; MINISTER(S); SUBORDINATE(S) AND SUPERORDINATE(S)
FUNCTIONARY(IES): II.A16n, functionaries prefer reward to punishment to create responsibility in themselves, but punishment to reward to create responsibility in others; A18, functionaries and power indicated; IV.A14, self-suppletive f. and provision of auxiliaries for functionaries; V.5.A5, moral v. legal obligations for functionaries and non-functionaries in ex. of statistic f.; IX.1.A2, good and evil with respect to functionaries' actions; 3.A1, number in office, one; 20.A2, securities for functionaries and non-functionaries pg 553against insubordination, oppression, extortion, and peculation; A2, nonfunctionaries as suitors, inspectors, and evidence holders; A3–5, defined and distinguished; 21.A4, functionaries and non-functionaries as oppressors and oppressees, examples given; A8, functionaries as oppressees, examples given; A34, remedies for oppression, functionaries as oppressees; 26.A2, affected by evils of delay, vexation and expense; A3, app. architectural arrangements reduce evils to both functionaries and suitors;A21–35, arrangements for oral communication with suitors with use of waiting boxes, public and private. See APTITUDE; ARCHITECTURE; FUNCTION(S); LEGISLATURE; LOCATION AND DISLOCATION; MINISTER(S); OPPRESSION; PRIME MINISTER; REMUNERATION; REWARD AND PUNISHMENT, SECURITIES; SELF-SUPPLETIVE FUNCTION; SUBORDINATE AND SUPERORDINATE
GERMANY: IX.19.A31, and origin of Russian code
GOD: IX.23.A12, anyone exempt from suspicion of delinquency is not man, but god upon earth
GOOD AND EVIL: II.A4, punishment as evil; A5, evil composed of pain and loss of pleasure; A6, reward as good; A7, good composed of pleasure and exemption from pain; A8–9, evil employed as means, as punishment; A11, in reward, good employed only as instrument of inducement; A12, evil as punishment, as opposed to reward, has larger role in government; A13, rulers employ good for themselves by instruments of inducement and evil for rules by instruments of coercion; A16&n, expectation of evil establishes responsibility; A16n, evil as waste, depradation, and corruption; A21, evil and compensational v. punitional responsibility; A22, punishment, dislocation, and evils of inapt.; V.5.A3, good and evil and executive f.; A6, evils—delay, vexation, and expense—v. justice; A8, good and evil effects from amendments; 6.A4, criminal evil consciousness and penal code; VI.1.A9, deputy cares for good of community; A10, insincerity as evil in relations between deputy and constituents; 20.A11, evil effects of interrupted attendance of legislators; A20, good done v. good left undone and U.S. president's message to congress; 23.A10, evil and fluctuation in attendance at leg.; A14, evil and adequacy of supply of deputy's substitutes; 24.A10, evil and short life of leg.; 25.A14–17, A46, evil and undiscontinued relocability; 27.A5, evil and separation of elicitative and imperative fs.; A17, evil and limits to extraction of evidence by leg.; A48, 'evil doers' and 'evil deeds' in English judicial practice; A49–50, good and evil in House of Commons; 28.A l l, evil and unredressed wrongs; 29.A6, good and bad effects indicated in emendation in reeditive mode; 31.A11–12, evil and serving private interest; A16, need to prevent evil; A17- 19, evil recognized in subject many, but not in ruling few; A23, propensity to evil and need for securities; A28, evil from lawyer class in representative democracy; A42, evil and securities for app. apt.; VIIn, evil and use of legislator's inaugural declaration; 2, evil and ends of government; 6, tax on justice produces by law the evils of anarchy; 11, evil and need for secrecy; VIII.1.A5, incorrect names and resultant evil; 3.A8, evil and p.m.'s responsibility; 8.A6, good and evil of open and secret voting; 11.A3, evil of expense v. good of publicity; A4, good of publicity discussed; A5–6, A14, good and evil of publicity; A8, time limit to secrecy to min. evil; A10, no limits to good of publicity; A15, good of publicity and limits to secrecy; IX.1.A1, max. good and min. evil as ends; A2&n, good and evil defined; 3.A7, evil increased in proportion to number in office; 4.A54, good, evil, and serviceable v. disserviceable pg 554dispositions; 7.1st.A17, A19, uses of service and loss books to max. good, min. evil; 4th.A31, evils of expenditure on needless amusements; 6th.A6, evil intention and evil consciousness, and securities against misconduct in ex. Of statistic f. ; 10.A24, evil in English practice where parties in office control information; 11.A10, evils and extraction of information; 13.A3, evil and length of service of minister; 15.A7, liberality as good and evil; A9, arbitrary remuneration, neither good nor evil; A44, naturally extravasated remuneration, pure good 17.A37, evil consciousness and criminal responsibility; A39, evil and invalidation of mislocatee's acts; A44, pecuniary competition principle, as applied, good without evil; A53, evil would outweigh good by rejection of examination and pecuniary competition systems; 17.Con.Inst. A4–5, for public good and to min. evil, functionaries to quit jobs or acquire instruction, when instruction system introduced; 19.A28, good and evil effects of promotion; A31, good and evil in arrangement of power, rank, and emolument of Catherine the second of Russia; 20.A20, mass of evil——delay, vexation and expense—in judicial procedure in most governments; 21.A24–5, factitious delay, vexation and expense and evil in remedy in systems of procedure; A66, evil and use of word ' transference' instead of 'degradation' ; 24.A9, evil in ex. and non-ex. Of sistitive f. by administrative functionaries considered; 25.A23, importance of publicity where no great evil or expense; A26, evils where minister can screen misdeeds of subordinates; A36, estimates of relative evil in functionaries' ex. of extraordinary power; A37, leg. and remedy of evils which prompted functionaries' ex. of extraordinary power; 26.A2, relative good and evil in relation to architectural arrangements; A2, evils of delay, vexation and expense; A8, good of secret suffrage; A12, architectural arrangements as means to achieve goods dependent on publicity and secrecy. See CORRUPTION; DELAY; EXPENSE; EXTORTION; MAXIMIZE AND MINIMIZE; OPPRESSION; PECULATION; PLEASURE AND PAIN; PUBLICITY; SECURITIES; VEXATION
GOVERNMENT(THE): IV.A6, consists of legislative and administrative depts.
GOVERNMENT ADVOCATE: IX.15.A26, and suits concerning remuneration
GOVERNMENT ADVOCATE GENERAL: V.3.A7–8, and ex. of the punifactive f. by constitutive authority; VI.2.A9, defendant in suits brought by foreign governments; IX.15.A26, and suits concerning remuneration GRAND JURY: See ENGLISH PRACTICE
HAPPINESS: (i) Happiness or greatest happiness of greatest number: II.A1, V.3.A6, 6.A5, VI.2.A1, 31.A42, VII.2, IX.1.A1, 3.A23, 26.A49; (ii) Greatest happiness principle: II.A1, A8–9, A11, A12, A14, V.4.A4, 5.A6, VI.31.A3, IX.17.A43, A47, 20.A11, 25.A43; (iii) Maximize happiness: II.A13, A14, A16, A23, VI.27.A43; (iv) V.5.A3, happiness; VIII.11.A4, happiness of individuals; A6, IX.19.A14, happiness of few at expense of many; VII.9, happiness of people; IX.3.A23, greatest happiness of ruling one and subruling few; 4.A15, A16, 21.A21, sum of happiness. See ENDS IN VIEW; GOOD AND EVIL; PLEASURE AND PAIN
HEALTH MINISTER: IX.2.A1, serves under p.m.; 9.A7, joint visits in ex. Of inspective f.; 16.A15, requisite talents for position. See HEALTH SUBDEPARTMENT; MINISTER(S)
HEALTH SUBDEPARTMENT: VIII.11.A6, and evils of publicity; IX.9.A4, offices to be visited in ex. of inspective f.; 16.A15, talent-requiring situations and requisite talents, examples given; 20.A13, private institutions which may be subject to inspection, examples given. See HEALTH MINISTER
pg 555HONOUR, NATURAL AND FACTITIOUS: VI.30.A1, acceptance of factitious honour from foreign state cause of dislocation of member of leg.; VII.3, appetite for factitious honour and dignity to be avoided by legislators; 4, honour for nation at expense of indigent not object of legislator; 8, factitious honour not to be received by legislators; VIII. 12.A l, dislocation of p.m. for acceptance of factitious honour from foreign government, as security for app. apt.; IX.5.A12, factitious honour and superiority; 15.A19, natural honour defined; A18, no other honorary reward under constitution allowed; A19, rendered by p.o. trib. for extraordinary service; A20, A23, natural honour judicially augmented; A21–7, recorded in public merit register; A28, publication as arranged by leg.; A29, factitious honour repugnant to principles of constitution; A30–1, titles of honour, examples given; A34, quantum of natural honour adjusts always to quantum of merit, factitious honour does not; 25.A3, dislocability of ministers for accepting factitious honour from foreign governments. See DIGNITY AND FACTITIOUS DIGNITY; REMUNERATION
HOSTILITY: VII.2, security against hostility as positive end of government. See COMMOTION; SECURITIES; WAR
HOUSE OF COMMONS: See ENGLISH PRACTICE
HOUSE OF LORDS: See ENGLISH PRACTICE
IMMOVABLE(S) AND MOVABLE(S): VI.27.A12, immovables and movables and the sources of evidence; IX.4.A10, everything not fictitious entity referable to; A10, distinction based on Roman law; A10, preferable to distinction between realty and personalty; All, things movable: movables at large and money; All, fs. ex. differently for each; 23.A14, 'money's worth' in all its shapes, movable and immovable, and peculation. See ENTITIES, REAL AND FICTITIOUS; EVIDENCE
IMPARTIALITY AND PARTIALITY: V.3.A10, trial of member of leg. by legislation penal judicatory and avoidance of partiality; VI.27.A18, A44, impartiality, a desirable property of evidence; A54, impartiality of evidence elicited by monarch's commissions; 28.A8, impartiality and membership of legislation penal judicatory; VII.7, impartiality in elections by legislators; 8, impartiality in international relations discussed; 9, impartiality in ex. of power discussed; IX.16.A67, use of lot to exclude partiality in examination system. See EVIDENCE; PECULATION
IMPERATIVE FUNCTION: VI.27.A4, imperative and elicitative fs., how connected; A5, desirable, though impractical, to be performed by same person; VIII.2.A8–11, A13–16, p.m. to ex. imperative f. in relation to defensive force; IX.21.A17, judges ex. of imperative f. and undivided responsibility; A36, not to be ex. by dislocation judicatory; A39, opinative v. imperative fs.
IMPORTANT AND UNIMPORTANT: IX.4.A15, occurrences subject to registration f; A15, defined and distinguished; A19, and written instruments; A56, and statistic f.
IMPROVEMENT: See REFORM
INCIDENTAL COMPLAINT BOOK: IX.21.A20, used as indirectly applying remedy against oppression
INDICATIVE (OR SUGGESTIVE) FUNCTION: VIII.3.A5, ex. by p.m. in sending messages to leg.; 12.A1, responsibility of p.m. to ex. as security for app. apt.; IX.12.A2, included in melioration suggestive f. ; A2, how ex.; 25.A3, responsibility of ministers to ex. as security for app. apt.
pg 556INDIGENCE: VII.4, and waste and corruption;IX.17.A56, and depredation. See INDIGENCE RELIEF MINISTER; INDIGENCE RELIEF SUBDEPARTMENT
INDIGENCE RELIEF MINISTER: IX.2.A1, serves under p.m.; 9.A7, joint visits and ex. of inspective f. ; 16.A 15, requisite talents for position. See INDIGENCE RELIEF SUBDEPARTMENT; MINISTER(S)
INDIGENCE RELIEF SUBDEPARTMENT: IX.2.A10, potentially joined with education subdept.; 9.A4, offices to be visited in ex. of inspective f.; 16.A15, talent-requiring situations and requisite talents, examples given; 20.A13, private institutions which may be subject to inspection, examples given. See INDIGENCE RELIEF MINISTER
INDUCEMENT AND COERCION: II.A9, evil as punishment employed as instrument of coercion; All, good employed in matters of reward as an instrument of inducement; A13, necessary to employ instrument of coercion to rulers; A13, rulers tend to employ inducement to themselves and coercion to rulees. See REWARD AND PUNISHMENT
INFORMATION: VI.24.A8–10, information and continuation committee; 31.A44, information and securities for app. intellectual apt.; VIII.11.A4, publicity and information; A14, information and rules for limiting secrecy; 12.A2, p.m. to act on information of misconduct or inaptitude of ministers; IX.10.A1, need of information for public and private business; A2, information v. evidence; A3, direct information v. communicated information; A4, communication upon application v. spontaneous communication; A5–6, received v. elicited information; A7, neglect of information by legislators; A8, arrangements in legislative and judiciary depts.; A9, need for arrangements for information in administrative dept., in addition to registration and publication systems. See EVIDENCE; INFORMATION ELICITATIVE FUNCTION; INFORMATIVE FUNCTION; OFFICIALLY INFORMATIVE FUNCTION; PUBLICATION SYSTEM; PUBLICITY AND SECRECY
INFORMATION ELICITATIVE FUNCTION: IX.10.A8, alloted to leg.; A15, and officially informative f.; IX.11.A1, may be ex. by every functionary; A2, exceptions noted; A3, receptive v. extractive mode for communication between functionaries; A4, and non-functionaries; A4, spontaneous v. unwilling communicators; A4, unwilling communication and judiciary establishment; A5, unwilling communication: administrative v. judiciary depts.; A6, ministers have power to elicit information; A6, legislative to determine which subordinate functionaries to have power; A6–7, securities against abuse; A8, extractive f., ex. by number of people at same time; A9, leg. to determine power to extract information in army and navy subdepts.; A10, leg. to avoid abuse of extractive power by functionaries; All, avoidance of information on religious opinions; A12, leg. to determine obligations to disclose information; A13, obligation to furnish information spontaneously, examples given; A14, and English practice; 16.A62, correspondent f. of examiners to exhibition of examinees; A63, modes of elicitation applicable to examination. See ELICITATIVE FUNCTION; INFORMATION; INFORMATIVE FUNCTION; OFFICIALLY INFORMATIVE FUNCTION
INFORMATION RECEPTIVE FUNCTION: IX.10.A16, and officially informative f. See OFFICIALLY INFORMATIVE FUNCTION INFORMATIVE FUNCTION: VIII.3.A3–4, ex. by p.m. in sending messages to leg.; 12.A1, responsibility of p.m. to ex. as security for app. apt.; IX.25.A3, responsibility of p.m. to ex., as security for app. apt. See INFORMATION; MESSAGES; OFFICIALLY INFORMATIVE FUNCTION
pg 557INFORMER(S): IX.26.A32–7, motives of and reasons for secret meetings with ministers. See ARCHITECTURE
INITIATIVE FUNCTION: VIII.3.A6–7, ex. by p.m. in sending messages to leg.; A6n, U.S. practice; A7, f. may be ex. through deputy or minister; 12.A1, responsibility of p.m. to ex. as security for app. apt.; IX.17.A21, 19.A16, ex. in location; 24.A l, ex. by ministers in legislative assembly; 25.A3, responsibility of ministers to ex. as security for app. apt. See CONSUMMATIVE FUNCTION
INSANITY: VI.30.A1, as cause of dislocation of members of leg.
INSPECTION: VI.27.A55, inspection of distant dependencies by commissioners in English practice; IX.26.A20n, importance of, and Panopticon. See INSPECTIVE FUNCTION; INSPECTOR(S)
INSPECTIVE FUNCTION: VIII.10.A6, use of exemplars in ex. of; IX.4.A54, ex. by ministers collectively in regard to things; A54, ex. prior to ex. Of directive f.; A54, includes quasi-inspective f.; A54, objects stated; A55, and visitative f.; 9.A1, inspective v. visitative fs.; A l, progresses v. circuits; A2, frequency of visits to offices in subdepts.; A2, visit by minister or depute permanent; A2, spontaneous visits v. visits directed by p.m.; A3, purposes of visitation system, examples given; A4, offices to be visited, examples given; A5, different ministers may inspect the same office, but no clash of authority; A5–6, p.m. to arrange that no visits by ministers coincide, to act as check; A6, exception where need for consultation; A7, examples given where joint inspection of ministers desirable; A8, use of chance to secure unexpected visits desirable; A9, as security, how best used; A10, special importance of inspective f. at establishments under private management; All, advantages and disadvantages of unexpected visits; 15.A57, indemnification of ministers for inspection visits; 20.A10, separation of inspective f. from directive and dislocative fs.; A10–11, importance to constitution of public inspection of private institutions; A13, private institutions which may be subject to inspection, examples given; 25.A12, inspective f. ex. by inspectors as members of p.o. trib., and visitors' deportment rules; A23, importance of access to register books for ex. of. See INSPECTION; INSPECTORS; INSUBORDINATION
INSPECTOR(S) AND INSPECTEE(S): IX.20.A2, as non-functionary; A4, inspectee defined; A7, and quasi-insubordination; A21, remedies for noncompliance of inspectees; A24, leg. to determine which grades to have securities against disturbance and non-compliance of inspectees; 21.A4, inspectees as oppressees; A6, examples given; A20, inspectees and use of incidental complaint book; 25.A12, inspectors as members of p.o. trib. And visitor's deportment rules. See INSPECTION; INSPECTIVE FUNCTION; INSUBORDINATION; OPPRESSION
INSTRUCTIVENESS: VI.27.A18, A44, as desirable property of evidence
INSUBORDINATION: IX.20.A1, leg. to consider applicability of arrangements for obviation of insubordination to army and navy services; A2, securities for functionaries and non-functionaries regarding insubordination; A3–5, non-functionaries: suitors, inspectees, evidence-holders defined; A6, insubordination defined; A7, quasi-insubordination defined; A8, insubordination v. quasi-insubordination; A9, modes of disturbance listed; A10–11, importance to constitution of inspection of private institutions; A10, separation of pg 558inspective f. from dislocative and directive fs.; A12, secret institutions under representative democracy and tyranny; A13, private institutions which may be inspected, examples given; A14, insubordination by subordinates, when committed; A15, remedies for quasi-insubordination; A16, rules for deportment of non-functionaries to prevent disturbance; A17, called rules of good behaviour, good manners, good breeding or decorum; A18, execution of rules and moral sanction of p.o. trib.; A19, leg. to consider where legal sanctions applicable; A20, use of judicial procedure and consideration of delay, vexation, and expense; A21, remedy for non-compliance of inspectee; A22, remedy for non-compliance of evidence-holder; A23, remedies against insubordination, same as for quasi-insubordination; A24, leg. to determine which grades to have securities against disturbance and non-compliance of suitors, inspectees and evidence-holders; A25, non-compliance of subordinate, remedies given; 21.A2, insubordination v. oppression; A67, temporary transference to inferior grade as punishment for insubordination. See OPPRESSION; SUBORDINATE AND SUPERORDINATE
INTEREST(S): II.A16, sovereign power to those with interest in max. happiness; VI.1.A9, deputy and particular will v. universal interest; A10, aggregate of particular interests v. national interest; A l l -1 2, deputy's duty when opposed to particular interest of constituents; 20.A12, non-attendance in mixed monarchies caused by sinister interest of rulers; 24.A12, sinister interest and interest-begotten prejudice of rulers, reason for no provision for continuation committee; 25.A23, corruptive influence and interest of district at expense of general interest of state 27.A28, delay detrimental to public interest and elicitation committees; A32, diverse and conflicting personal interests and elicitation judicatory; A33–4, conflicts of interest and use of professional advocates; A46, House of Commons and common interest; A47, A50, rightly directed and directing interest v. sinister interest of English judiciary; A47, universal interest v. sinister interest of monarch; A52, inutility of House of Lords to every interest but its own; 29.A6, interest of the community expressed in emendative ordinances; 31.A11–12, man will advance private interest at expense of public interest; A18, English judges and allies, a community of particular and sinister interest; A42, locators have interest in happiness of greatest number; VII.5, interests of individuals and the laws; 8, international relations and opening eyes of men to true interests; 9, avoiding partiality through self-regarding interest and interest inspired by sympathy and antipathy; VIII.8.A6, seductive influence of personal interests in choice of p.m.; 11.A6, one's own interest v. general interest and secret voting; A7, hostility to interest of greatest number and publicity; IX.3.A8–9, number in an office and community of sinister interest; A32, sinister interest in English judiciary; IX.9.A7, united and antagonizing interests and inspection by two or more ministers; 10.A7, particular and sinister interest of legislators; A24, sinister interest and English leg.; 15.A44, self-regarding or sympathetic interests and naturally extravasated reward; 16.A29, instructors as quasijurymen, interest of reputation; 17.A43–4, aggregate pecuniary interest gains with pecuniary competition; A44, personal interest of locating superordinate; A47, interest now in max. expense of labour; A49, sinister interest of part v. interest of whole and gratuitous service; 17.Con.Inst.Al, powerful particular and sinister interests v. p.o. trib.; Ain, government favourable to interests of many prevented by delusion and corruption; 19.A10, service for life, as security against self-regarding interest; A23, interest of public and repetition pg 559of qualification examination; A31, universal interest v. particular interests; A36, particular, personal and sinister interest of monarch in Russia; A38, public interest and extra remuneration; 25.A1, pleasure and pain create motives and then interests; A47, particular and sinister interest of some classes v. universal interest; 26.A34, self-regarding or sympathetic interest and informers; A35–6, one's own v. public interest and secret information; A40, interest of monarch, sacrifice required
INTERIOR AND EXTERIOR: IX.4.A14, as occurrences referable to official establishment, defined and distinguished; A19, and written instruments; A56, and statistic f.; 7.1st.A14, and journal books. See OCCURRENCES; STATISTIC FUNCTION
INTERIOR COMMUNICATION MINISTER: IX.2.A1, serves under p.m.; 9.A7, joint visits and ex. of inspective f.; 16.A15, requisite talents for position. See INTERIOR COMMUNICATION SUBDEPARTMENT; MINISTER(S)
INTERIOR COMMUNICATION SUBDEPARTMENT: IX.2.A10, potentially joined with domain subdept.; 9.A4, offices to be visited in performance of inspective f.; 16.A15, talent-requiring situations and requisite talents, examples given. See INTERIOR COMMUNICATION MINISTER
INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS: VII.8, justice in international relations discussed. See FOREIGN GOVERNMENTS; STATE; WAR
IRELAND: I.A6(inst.diss.), and size of territorial divisions; IX.26.A20n, and Panopticon plan
JUDGEMENT: See APTITUDE; WILL
JUDICATORY, APPELLATE: I.A3, each district is territory of appellate judictory; IV.A13, one judge in each appellate judicatory; VI.28.A9–16, leg. As appellate judicatory; VIII.10.A6, use of exemplars from immediate judicatories; IX.21.A15, power of special judge to invoke assistance of judge immediate in case of oppression; A16, reasons given; A17, fs. stated; A72, power of special judge appellate to invoke assistance of ordinary judge, leg. to determine. See JUDICATORY, IMMEDIATE; JUDICIARY AUTHORITY
JUDICATORY, IMMEDIATE: I.A4, each subdistrict is territory of immediate judicatory; IV.A13, one judge in each immediate judicatory; VIII.10.A6, and use of exemplars from appellate judicatories; IX.21.A12, right of appeal to judge appellate in cases where minister or judge immediate applies remedies against oppression; A72, special judge appellate to invoke assistance of ordinary judge, leg. to determine. See JUDICATORY, APPELLATE; JUDICIARY AUTHORITY
JUDICIAL REVIEW: See ANTI-CONSTITUTIONAL ORDINANCES
JUDICIARY AUTHORITY: IV.A1, judiciary, one of four authorities in state; A3, leg. to locate and dislocate chiefs of judiciary dept, and upon certain occasions give individual direction; A5, judiciary to give execution and effect to ordinances of leg. where there is litiscontestation; A6, administrative and judiciary depts. compose the executive, and the executive and judiciary depts. compose the operative; A7, use of word 'supreme' discussed; A8, for each authority, a dept.; A13, single-seated in judiciary dept.; V.2.A5, judges dislocable by constitutive authority; 4.A1, member of p.o. trib. v. member of pg 560judiciary dept.; VI.1.A5, dependence on legislative authority; A6, where nonperformance or inapt., leg. can take over fs. of judiciary authority; 2.A2, and anti-constitutional ordinances; A5, judicial enforcement of contracts; A6, between government and foreign state; A7, between government and subject of foreign state; A9, judicial remedy for wrong done to foreign government; A10, and action of leg.; 20.A24, English judges and architectural arrangements to exclude observers; 25.A30, applicability of rule of minimizing contact to judiciary noted; 27.A1, legislation enquiry judicatory v. ordinary judicatory; A5, desirable, though impracticable for elicitative and inspective fs. to be performed by same person; A15–17, powers of legislation enquiry judicatory ; A26, judges eligible to serve as legislation elicitors; A29, liberty of choice of building for legislation enquirers v. judicial proceedings; A36, employment of judge as legislation elicitor; A37, secrecy and size of judicatory; 28.A9–16, leg. as an appellate judicatory; 31.A1, judiciary establishment and all pervading system of securities; A42–4, judiciary and securities for app. apt. of leg.; VII.6, judiciary branch accessible to all without taxes or other obstacles; 9, impartiality and legislators as judges; 12, judiciary authority and encroachment by leg.; VIII.10.A5, use of manifold writing system by judiciary; A6, manifold writing system as security against destruction of judicial documents; A7, preservation and destruction of judicial documents; 11.A6, judiciary and evils of publicity ; IX.3.A32, number in office and judiciary v. administrative in English practice; 4.A32–7, terminology of 'rules', 'orders', and 'mandates' and use in judiciary; 5.A7, judiciary superordinate to administrative authority in ex. of punitive power, but subordinate in power of direction, suspension, dislocation, transfer, suppletion; 10.A8, judiciary and elicitation of evidence; 11.A4–5, and unwilling communication of evidence; 15.A20–7, and natural honour augmented; A34, factitious honour unsuitable, even if judicially conferred; A52–3, judges to guard against fraud in extraordinary remuneration; 16.A3, judges to certify app. apt. of candidates for location; A18, judges who are members of qualification judicatory for entry on locable list enumerated; 17.A59, judges in English practice; 18.A7, minister not dislocable by sentence or decree of a judge; A8–10, reasons given; 21.A11–17, in directly-applying remedies for oppression where oppressor a functionary, oppressee to have judicatory or minister as special judge; A13, power and obligation of judge; A13–14, remedies listed; A15, judges immediate of district may be invoked; A16, reasons given; A17, fs. of judges; A18, p.m. as special judge where oppressor a minister; A19, legislation penal judicatory where p.m. is oppressor; A36, in directly-applying remedies against oppression-by abuse of dislocative f., judge has no power of relocation; A20, proceedings in administrative dept, as in judiciary dept, for indirectly-applying remedies against oppression; A28–31, military judicatories v. ordinary judicatories in English practice; A37–8, dislocation judicatory, where held; A39, decrees, options open; A40, uses of decrees; A41–2, decrees, not obligatory; A43, minister may give effect to decrees; A73, arrangements for exemplars of record; 25.A42, judge made law v. leg. made law; A49, acting on precedent is anti-constitutional when by executive and judiciary in opposition to leg.; A50, use of proposed judicial procedure in the non-military subdepts. of the administrative dept., denied in English practice; A51, English judicial practice combines arbitrary dislocability mixed with virtual undislocability ; A5 2, King's Bench ineffectual; A53, judge and jury system corrupt and evidence arrangements exclude all but willing testimony; A54, p.o. trib. in English pg 561practice checks oppression in spite of law; A55–6, purchase of justice in English practice; A57, no security against oppression in English practice; A58, military procedure superior to English practice; 26.A10, greatest publicity needed in judiciary dept.; A54, judicial offices to be separate from those of administrative dept. See ENGLISH PRACTICE; JUDICATORY, APPELLATE; JUDICATORY, IMMEDIATE; LEGISLATION PENAL JUDICATORY
JUSTICE AND INJUSTICE: V.5.A6, IX.20.A20, ends of justice and the procedure code; A6, delay, vexation, and expense v. justice; 6.A2, defamation of functionaries and injustice and justice; A5, injustice and suppression of truth; VI.25.A20, vengeance at expense of justice in monarchy; 27.A33, justice, conflicts of interest and use of professional advocates; A36, justice, occasionally served by secrecy in legislation enquiry judicatory; A47, justice and injustice and English judiciary; 28.A11, injustice of unredressed wrongs; VII.3, injustice and factitious honour; 6, accessibility to justice and judicial system discussed; 8, justice in international relations; IX.3.A32, 4.A34, 25.A55–6, sale of justice in English practice; 15.A34, justice, injustice and reward; A45, mislocated reward is injustice; A45, naturally present in monarchies; A45, excluded from code by exclusion of all arbitrarily conferred reward; 16.A25n, A29n, justice and injustice and modes of voting; A61, chance used to min. injustice in examinations; 21.A26, A29, A30, ends of justice and rules of deportment; 22.A6, justice denied in English judiciary; 25.A28, justice and responsibility for subordinates; 26.A21, unjust favour in audience with minister avoided; A46, need for protection against public commotion where conduct of government is just or unjust. See ENGLISH PRACTICE
JUSTICE MINISTER: IV.A13, one justice minister in state; V.2.A5, dislocable by constitutive authority; VI.25.A19, justice minister, corruption and undiscontinued locability; 28.A l, subject to trial by legislation penal judicatory ; A8, impartial trial by legislation penal judicatory; A15, role of justice minister noted; VII.7, impartial election by leg. of justice minister; VIII.1.A2, p.m.'s logical field of service v. justice minister's; 10.A6, use of exemplars in ex. of inspective and melioration suggestive fs.; IX.15.A9, justice minister and exemption from punishment; 16.A18, justice minister or depute, presiding judge of qualification judicatory for entry on locable list; 21.A38, and dislocation judicatory; 26.A54, office remote from administrative dept. See JUDICIARY AUTHORITY; MINISTER(S)
JUSTICES OF THE PEACE: See ENGLISH PRACTICE
KNOWLEDGE: See APTITUDE
LABOUR & LABOURER(S): VI.20.A10, remuneration of day labourers v. high government officials; 31.A38, wealth extorted from those whose labour produces it, in mixed monarchies; IX.15.A6, competition and the price of labour; 16.A52, public remuneration of instructors not to be larger than that received for subsistence by lowest-paid class of labourers; 17.A45, price of labour, skilled and unskilled, min. by competition; A46, application of principle by rulers to their own labour resisted; A47, in England expense of official labour max.; A51, intellectual labour and timid merit; 19.A14, labour in public service and remuneration for longevity; A26, time and labour wasted in qualification examination for situations of trust; A29, power as inducement to time and labour; 25.A45, labour of thought saved in following precedents
LANGUAGE: I.A6(inst.diss.)&n, names of territorial divisions exhibit characteristics of universal language; Vlln, structure of sentences in code discussed; pg 562IX.4.A3, names are nouns-substantive; A3, only by names are fs. designated
LAW OR MANDATE: VII.5, law to be clearly presented and readily available for use and instruction; VIII.11.A4, publicity and the force of the law; IX.4.A23, defined as written instrument from functionary to subordinate or to non-functionary; A24, transitory v. naturally permanent mandates; A25, transitory mandates defined; A26, naturally permanent mandates defined; A26, naturally permanent mandates from legislative authority called laws; A27, leg. can issue transitory mandates; A28, transitory mandates usually issued by authorities subordinate to leg.; A29, spontaneous v. elicited mandates; A30, elicited mandates produced by application instrument; A31, ordinance defined as any permanent mandate but especially from legislative authority; A31, law v. ordinance; A31, 'law' defined as species of command; A32, rules, regulations, orders—confused phraseology in common practice; A33, rule defined; A34–5, confusion and abuse in English practice; A36, 'mandate' superior term to 'rule' or 'order'; A38, mandates and written forms; A39, application to judiciary; A40, arrangement defined; A47, procurement mandate and ex. of procurement f. See AMENDMENT(S): LEGISLATURE; MOTION(S); WRITTEN INSTRUMENT(S)
LAWYER(S): VI.31.A27, lawyer class in representative democracy opposed to securities; A28, example of U.S. government given; A29, ascendancy in English practice and common law; A30, U.S. practice v. English practice; A4In, professional lawyers and English practice; IX.21.A29, max. wealth, power and reputation at expense of community; 25.A47, lawyer subclass and particular and sinister interest. See ADVOCATE(S)
LECTIVE FUNCTION: IX.25.A23, importance of access to register books for ex. of
LEGISLATION ENQUIRY JUDICATORY: VI.27.A1, defined and distinguished from ordinary judicatory; A2, leg. to ex. power to elicit evidence; A3, called elicitative f.; A4, how connected to ex. of imperative f.; A5, desirable, though impracticable, for imperative and elicitative fs. to be performed by same person; A6, factors determining leg.'s undertaking ex. of elicitative f.; A7, preappointed evidence defined; A8–9, examples given; A10, oral v. epistolary evidence; A11, active v. passive elicitator; A12, sources of evidence distinguished; A13, evidence elicitation committee v. whole leg.; A14, provision for legislation enquiry judicatory; A15, powers to secure attendance at legislation enquiry judicatory stated; A16, powers of leg. to extract information discussed; A17, limits to the extraction of evidence discussed; A18, desirable properties of evidence discussed; A19–21, securities against deception by falsehood; A22, how leg. will conduct enquiry; A23, committee for elicitation of evidence, how organized; A24, committee members termed 'legislation elicitors' ; A25, eligibility for membership on committee; A26, judges eligible to serve as legislation elicitors; A27, elicitation process not to conflict with legislative duties of deputy or continuation commiteeman; A28, no limit to number of committees established by leg.; A29, max. of publicity and choice of edifice for enquiry; A30, number to be examined at once; A30–1, confrontation in examinations: occasions and purposes; A32, arrangements where diverse and conflicting interests; A33, use of professional advocates; A34, but avoiding delay where conflict between public and particular interests; A35, publicity max.; A36, employment of judge as legislation elicitor; A37, secrecy and size of judicatory; A38, securities applicable to legislation pg 563enquiry judicatory same as for leg.; A39, legislation enquiry report and ex. Of methodization, condensation and application fs.; A40, best written by single hand; A41–56, English practice for eliciting evidence; 31.A44, legislation enquiry judicatory and securities for app. intellectual apt.; IX.4.A27, and temporary mandates; 10.A8, .and information. See ENGLISH PRACTICE
LEGISLATION MINISTER: V.3.A4, legislation minister and the ex. of the dislocative f. by the constitutive authority; VI.20.A5, keeps record of and publishes absences of legislators; 21.A3, legislation minister and arrangements for secret sittings; 23, A4–6, and arrangements for ex. of self-suppletive f.; A31, and arrangements for new election in absence of excuse paper; 25.A2, and relocation of deputies; 29.A4, as attestator to amendments; A9, consulted by members of leg. proposing ordinances; 31.A44, and securities for app. Intellectual apt.; VII.7, election of legislation minister to be impartial, promised by legislators; VIII.2.A15, to receive exemplars of p.m.'s actions regarding subordinates; IX.2.A1, serves under p.m.; 5.A34, no subordinates besides writing clerks may be required; A42, registrar and writing clerks as subordinates; 9.A7, joint visits in ex. of inspective f.; 26.A17, as not necessarily subject to p.m., no need for contiguous offices; A18, location of legislation minister's office best close to leg. See LEGISLATION SUBDEPARTMENT; MINISTER(S)
LEGISLATION PENAL JUDICATORY: V.3.A9, serves as judicatory when punifactive f. is ex. by constitutional authority; A10, arrangements to ensure impartiality when accused is member of leg.; VI.23.A32, and possible punishment for non-attendance in leg.; 26.A4, and wrongful exclusion of members of leg. by other members; 28.A l, functionaries subject to trial by legislation penal judicatory listed; A2, number of members of judicatory three or five; A3, eligibility as judges; A4, located by secret ballot; A5, leg. to appoint pursuers; A6, leg. to decide if time permits to take on legislation penal judicatory; A7, no vacancy should result in leg.; A8, impartiality in trials of p.m. and justice minister greater where judges not members of leg.; A9–16, .leg. as appellate judicatory; 31.A43, legislation penal judicatory and security for app. moral apt. of legislators; Vlln, legislation penal judicatory v. p.o. trib. and conduct of legislators; VIII.12.A1, punishment by as security for app. apt. of p.m.; IX.21.A19, as special judicatory when p.m. is accused of oppression
LEGISLATION REGARDING FUNCTIONS: IX.24.A1, each minister to ex. argumentative, initiative and responsive fs. in seat in leg.; A2, but no minister may vote; A3, minister bound to attend sessions of leg. to answer questions; A4–5, minister to act to improve and secure Pannomion from deterioration through use of legislative and judicial fs.; A6, to every situation subordinate to minister belong the contested interpretation reporting f. as well as the melioration suggestive f.; A7, leg. to determine which functionaries to ex. The preinterpretative f. with reference to Pannomion; A8, also sistitive f. ; A9, consideration of evil to occur with ex. and non-ex. of sistitive f.
LEGISLATION SUBDEPARTMENT: IX.9.A4, offices to be visited in ex. Of inspective f. See LEGISLATION MINISTER
LEGISLATOR'S INAUGURAL DECLARATION: VI.31.A43, as security for app. moral apt. of legislators; Vlln, chief use to subject leg. to p.o. trib.; VIIn, applicable where legal sanction not effective; Vlln, penalty of moral pg 564sanction, loss of popularity; Vlln, legislator's inaugural declaration as moral code and map of field of legislation; Vlln, provision for dissent and amendment; 1.A1, where and when read by elected members of leg.; A2, arrangements for unavoidable absence; A3, arrangements for amendments and reservations; A4, reasons for dissent and amendments to be noted; A5, dissent to essence of declaration and arrangements for new election; 2, comprehensive and specific ends of government stated; 3, discussion of the avoidance of appetites which have sinister influence; 4, avoidance of waste and corruption discussed; 5, law clearly presented and readily available for use and instruction; 6, judicial branch accessible to all members of society without tax or other obstacle; 7, legislator to be impartial in election of p.m., legislation minister, justice minister; 8, justice in international relations discussed; 9, impartiality in ex. of power discussed; 10, constant attendance at leg. promised; 11, no withdrawal of legislative proceedings from public scrutiny; 12, encroachment by leg. On subordinate authorities opposed; 13, sincerity in formulating legislative ordinances and debate promised; 14, legislator but an agent of his constituents; VIII.8.A2, after legislator's inaugural declaration, leg. elects p.m. See CONSTITUTIVE AUTHORITY; LEGISLATURE; PUBLIC OPINION TRIBUNAL
LEGISLATURE: I.A3, leg. composed of one deputy from each district; A3, leg. to alter the districts by union and division; A4, and subdistricts; A5, and bissubdistricts; A6, alteration must be commensurable with original plan; IV.A1, legislative authority—one of four in state; A2, constitutive authority to locate, dislocate, relocate, members of leg.; A2, not to give individual or specific direction to leg.'s measures; A2, relocation and dislocation as reward and punishment by constitutive authority; A3, leg. to locate and dislocate and give individual direction at times to chiefs of administrative and judiciary authorities and punish for non-compliance; A4, administrative dept, to give execution and effect to ordinances of leg. ; A5, judiciary department to give execution and effect to ordinances of leg. where there is litiscontestation; A6, legislative and administrative depts. to form the government; A6, legislative and executive depts. form the operative; A7, use of term 'supreme' discussed; A8, for each authority, a dept.; A9, leg. has under it as many sublegs, as there are districts; All, supreme leg. and local and logical fields of service; A12, supreme leg. many-seated, one seat for each district; V.2.A3, constitutive authority ex. locative power in sending deputies to leg.; A3n, 'deputy' v. 'representative' ; A5, members dislocable by constitutive authority; 3.A3, leg. To settle details of mode of election to subleg.; A4, leg. and the ex. of dislocative f. by constitutive authority; A7–10, leg. and the ex. of punifactive f. by constitutive authority; 6.A3, prohibition or taxation of political tracts by leg. is anti-constitutional and breach of duty to constitutive authority; A4, and exception for defamation; VI.1.A1, leg. is omnicompetent; A1, local and logical fields of service; A1, unlimited power, but checks are applied by securities; A2, past legs, have no power over current one; A3, acts of earlier legs, confirmed unless action to the contrary; A4, preservation of government engagements; A5, executive and sublegs, dependent on leg.; A5, leg. Dependent on constitutive authority; A6–7, leg. can, where non-performance or inaptitude, take over fs. of executive and sublegs.; A8, subjects of attention for leg. where exemplified; A9, communication between constituents and deputy; A9, duty of deputy to constituents; A10–12, duty of deputy where conflict between interest of constituents and national interest; A13, constitution variable by leg.; 2.A1, leg. to give execution and effect to the will of pg 565constitutive authority to max. greatest happiness of greatest number; A2, anti-constitutional ordinances of leg.; A3, constitutional authority alone can enforce contracts entered into by leg.; A4, observance of contracts discussed; A5, judicial enforcement of contracts between government and individuals of state; A6, between government and foreign state; A7, between government and subject of foreign state; A8, constitutive authority to ex. dislocative and punifactive fs., where breach of public faith; A9, judicial remedy for wrong done to foreign government; A10, and action of leg.; A11, and constitutive authority; 3.A1–4, leg. to ex. directive, corrective, and administrative fs. In relation to sublegs.; A5, arrangement for federative government; 4, election seats and districts; 5, electors; 6, eligibility; 7, election offices; 8, election apparatus; 9, proposal of members; 10, voters' titles; 11, election laws; 12, designation of election and voting districts; 13, vote making habitations; 14, term of service; 15, vacancies; 16, security of assembly against disturbance by members; 17, indisposition of presidents, how obviated; 18.A1–2, leg. Sits every day except vacation days (every seventh day); A2, legislator is 'physician of body politic' ; 19.A1, remuneration of legislators stated; 20.A1, single entrance to assembly chamber; A2, arrangements in assembly chamber for remuneration; A3, arrangements for departure from assembly chamber; A4, remuneration for days attended only, sickness not excepted; A5, absentation book and publication of record of absence of legislators; A6, arrangements for sickness; A7, suspicion of using sickness as pretence obviated; A8, withholding remuneration for non-attendance as punishment; A9, punishment of common soldier v. high government official; A10, remuneration by day discussed; A11, non-interrupted attendance v. interrupted attendance of legislators discussed; A12–13, interrupted attendance of legislators in mixed monarchies serves sinister interest of rulers; A14, use of prorogation and adjournment by monarch; A15–17, English practice; A18, U.S. practice; A19, importance of non-interrupted sittings; A20–1, U.S. practice and 'good left undone' ; A22, time unemployed and wasted in legislative business; A23, resistance to accepting obligations which make business more efficient; A24, good government depends on architecture; A25, other causes of retardation and frustration of legislative business; 21.A1, sittings of leg. are public, and p.o. trib. reports to constitutive authority; A2, access of p.o. trib. to sittings max.; A3, arrangements for secret sittings; A4–5, disclosure by subsequent leg.; 22.A1, shorter the term of service for leg. the better; A2–3, exception for distance from leg.; A4, settled arrangements for elections favoured; A5, practice in monarchies; A6, U.S. practice; [23.A1–28, See SELF-SUPPLETIVE FUNCTION] A29, distinctive dress and members of continuation committee; A30, notice of non-attendance by deputy and substitute to be posted by election clerk of district; A31, in absence of excuse paper new election arranged; A32, leg. to determine the validity of excuses; [24.A1–21. See CONTINUATION COMMITTEE] [25.A1–55, See RELOCATION] [26.A1–5, See EXCLUSION] [27.A1–56, See ENGLISH PRACTICE; LEGISLATION ENQUIRY JUDICATORY] [28.A1–16, See LEGISLATION PENAL JUDICATORY] [29.A1–10, See MOTION(S)] [30.A1, See LOCATION AND DISLOCATION] [31.A1–45, See SECURITIES] Vlln, chief use of legislator's inaugural declaration to subject leg. to p.o. trib.; 1.A5, dissent to essence of declaration and arrangements for election; 7, impartiality in elections by leg.; 11, secrecy in legislative proceedings discussed; 12, encroachment by leg. on subordinate authorities opposed; 13, avoidance of fallacies in formulating ordinances and pg 566in debate; VIII.1.A1, p.m.'s local field of service coextensive with leg.; 2.A1, p.m.'s ex. of executive f. and relation with leg.; 3.A1, p.m. has no seat in legislative assembly; A l-2, communication between p.m. and leg. by message only, unless invited or ordered by leg. to appear personally; fs. ex. by p.m. in relation to leg.: (i) A3–4, informative f.; (ii) A5, indicative f.; (iii) A6–7, initiative f.; A8, p.m. responsible for neglect of fs.; A9, usual communication through minister rather than by message; (iv) A10, statistic f. ; 5.A4, failure of leg. to elect p.m.; 6.A2, power of p.m. in relation to leg.; 7.A1, eligibility for location as p.m. by leg.; 8.A1, p.m. elected by leg.; A2, arrangements for election; A2–4, secret and open voting employed; A5, reaching a majority; A6, secret v. open voting discussed; 9.A1, p.m. dislocable by leg.; A2, and by constitutive authority; A3, grounds for dislocation, same as for member of leg.; 10.A7, leg. to arrange for preservation and periodic destruction of documents; 11.A15, p.m.'s report to leg. on need for secrecy; A16, committee of leg. To report, as check;A17, report discussed; A18, new members in leg. and prevention of concealment; 12.A1, registration system and leg., and security for app. apt. of p.m.; A1, dislocation by leg. as security for app. apt. of p.m.; IX.1.A3, ends to guide the legislator; 2.A9, concurrence of leg. required for separation of subdepts. once joined; 3.A21, single-seatedness not applicable to leg.; 4.A26–8, leg. and transitory v. permanent mandates; 5.A32, leg. To establish and vary number of grades within each subdept.; 6.A11, leg. Can except certain subordinate grades from ex. of self-suppletive f.; 7.5th.A2, creation of subsidiary books by leg. for ex. of statistic f.; 6th.A1, use of abbreviations, determined by leg.; 8.A2, leg. alone issues procurement mandates; A3, may delegate authority to p.m. or ministers; A18, leg. provides for outset supply; A19, determines on general supply day; A20, leg. to determine use of spontaneous mandate v. requisition instrument; A21, spontaneous procurement by leg. v. spontaneous procurement based on powers conferred by leg.; A23, leg. to use results of statistic and registration systems to determine supply; A23, to draw line between ordinary and extraordinary service; A23, and determine from and to which offices requisition instruments may be transmitted; A24, considerations to guide leg.; A29, leg. to have regard for cheapest form of procurement; 10.A11, information of all occurrences furnished to leg. and p.m.; A12, exceptions made by leg.; A14, leg. Makes arrangements for information sent to offices higher than immediate superordinates; 11.A6, leg. to determine which subordinate functionaries to have power to elicit information; A6–7, and to establish securities against abuse; A9, leg. to determine power to extract information by army and navy subdepts. for defence purposes; A10, leg. to avoid evil from abuse of extractive power; 13.A2–3, minister v. member of leg., terms of service; 14.A2, leg. To determine proportion of minister's time to be devoted to indoor and outdoor service; A3&n, need for continual attendance of leg. to receive reports from ministers, judiciary, and sublegs.; 15.A28, publication is arranged by leg. Of matter in public merit register; 16.A8, commencement of courses of instruction, times appointed by leg.; A10, leg. to have made and published office calendar, containing list of positions; A32, leg. to choose between various modes of voting in qualification judicatory after experience of each; A34, leg. will limit topics for interrogation regarding moral apt.; A47–8, leg. To make payment for instructors dependent on number of pupils and strenuousness of exertion; A51, leg. to regulate extra remuneration of instructors; A55–6, A58, leg. to make arrangements for examination; A60, and for pg 567examination of app. moral apt.; 17.A6, leg. to arrange for pecuniary security for locatees in positions of trust, or talent and trust; A l l, leg. to consider further checks against mislocation; A13, leg. may add to headings of location instrument; A15, leg. may arrange for property as pecuniary security to be inalienable by possessors; A19, leg. to consider differences in grades in subdepts. for bidding in competition system; A20, attention given to pain of humiliation, if superordinate and subordinate reverse positions; A20, distinguished from rise of one person above another functionary; A21, leg. to make exceptions as to locators; A32, leg. and p.m.'s substitution of locables; 18.A5, every minister dislocable at all times by leg.; 19.A1, leg. to allot to subordinates in subdepts. grades with distinctive fields of service and fs.; A2–3, subordinate subject to ex. of directive f. of super ordinate, exceptions to be made by leg.; A4, leg. to determine which register books to be kept in each grade; A5, leg. to determine which grades have power to ex. self-suppletive f.; A6, and requisitive f.; A7, and melioration suggestive f.; A11, leg. to determine application of rules of attendance to each office; A15, leg. to determine to which subordinate positions principles of location system can be applied; 19.A32, leg. to decide permanent v. temporary functionaries for government fabrication; A42, leg. to determine when distance requires suspension by subordinate to minister pending decision by minister regarding dislocation; A43, examples given; 20.A1, leg. to consider application of arrangements regarding insubordination, oppression, and extortion to military branch; A19, leg. to consider where legal sanction applicable to rules for deportment of non-functionaries; A24, leg. to determine which grades subordinate to minister to have securities against disturbance and non-compliance by suitors, inspectees and evidence holder ; 21.A20, leg. to determine whether variations in rules of deportment necessary for army and navy subdepts., as indirectlyapplying remedies against oppression; A38, leg. to consider circumstances for place where dislocation judicatory is held; A44–6, leg. has power to dislocate, promote, and transfer subordinate functionaries; A72, leg. to determine when appellate judge to invoke assistance of ordinary judge in case of oppression; A77, further considerations for leg. regarding extent of territory, distances from metropolis, facility of communication, numbers of grades in subdepts.; 23.A13, leg. may vary rules for receipt and disbursement of money; A14, legislator's vigilance regarding peculation; 24.A1, each minister, subject to leg., to ex. argumentative, initiative and responsive fs. in seat of leg.; A2, but no minister, even with consent, may vote in leg.; A3, ministers bound to attend sessions of leg. to answer questions; A7–9, leg. To determine which administrative functionaries to ex. the preinterpretative and sistitive fs. with reference to the Pannomion; 25.Aln, sketch of securities applicable to members of leg.; A2, leg. to decide which securities applicable to leg. and p.m. are applicable to ministers; A3, relevant securities listed; A3, dislocability of ministers by leg. as security for app. apt.; A9, leg. To arrange for new series of convicted list when list becomes too long; A24, leg. to arrange secrecy for extra despatch when necessary, as in time of war; A33, leg. to look for and exclude illegal ex. of power by functionaries and min. expansion of power based on necessity; A34, examples given; A35, leg. not to delegate power to ministers for emergencies; A37, leg. And conditions for exemption from punishment for functionaries' extraordinary ex. of power; A49, acting on precedent is anti-constitutional when by executive and judiciary in opposition to leg. See CONSTITUTIVE AUTHORITY; pg 568ENGLISH PRACTICE; MINISTER(S); PRIME MINISTER; PUBLIC OPINION TRIBUNAL
LIBERALITY: IX.15.A7, as virtue and vice in private and public spheres; 17. A55, ' liberality' v. 'munificence' ; A55, liberality and merit, connection denied. See WASTE
LIBERTY: See FREEDOM
LITERACY AND ILLITERACY: V.1.A3, non-readers excluded from suffrage; 4.A2, but included in p.o. trib.
LOCAL HEADMAN: I.A5, each bis-subdistrict the territory of local headman; A6(inst.diss.), number of local headmen in territory and fs. discussed; IV.A13, in each ultimate section of territory, one headman; V.2.A5, dislocable by constitutive authority; VI.31.A1, local headmen and all pervading system of securities; A42, local headmen and securities for app. apt. of leg.
LOCAL REGISTRAR(S): V.2.A5, dislocable by constitutive authority; VI.27.A9, local registrars and preappointed evidence; 31.A1, and all pervading system of securities; A42, A44, and securities for app. apt. of legislators
LOCATION AND DISLOCATION: II.A17, principles for official apt.: public examination, pecuniary competition, and responsible location; A20, dislocational responsibility discussed; A22–3, dislocation, punishment, and legal responsibility discussed; IV.A2, constitutive authority to locate and dislocate members of leg.; A3, leg. to locate and dislocate chiefs of administrative and judiciary depts.; V.1.A1, constitutional authority and location and dislocation, immediately and interventionally; 2.A1, immediate v. interventional dislocation; VI.1.A9, duty of deputy to constituents and grounds for dislocation; 23.A1, location of depute and ex. of self-suppletive f.; A3, eligibility for location as substitute; 24.A1–2, location of continuation committee; 25.A48-9, p.m.'s power of location and dislocation as security against corruption; 26.A4–5, dislocation and wrongful exclusion of members of leg. by othe members; 28.A l, trial by legislation penal judicatory where dislocation deemed not sufficient punishment; A4, judges located by secret ballot; A8, impartiality by members of legislation penal judicatory; 30.A1, causes of dislocation of members of leg. listed: (1) resignation; (2) acceptance of other office in state; (3) acceptance of office in foreign state; (4) acceptance of factitious honour or dignity from foreign state; (5) insanity; (6) disturbance of legislative proceedings; (7) criminal delinquency; (8) dislocation by constituents; 31.A44, location system and security for app. intellectual apt. in leg.; VIII.2.A3, p.m.'s ex. of locative f.; A5–7, and dislocative f.; A l l, p.m. and location and dislocation in army; A13, and navy; A14, authenticating instruments; A15, use of manifold writing system; A16, arrangements for redress; 4.A1, location and dislocation of depute; A5–6, responsibility of principal for depute and dislocation; A7–8, arrangements for location of depute; A10, death of principal and location of successor; A l l, dislocability of depute; 5.A4, dislocation of leg. and responsibility to hold election of p.m.; 6.A2, location and dislocation and power of p.m. in relation to leg.; 7.A1, eligibility for location as p.m.; A2, monarchs and relations of monarchs excluded; A3, residency requirements stated; 8.A1, p.m. located by leg.; A2, arrangements for election; A2–4, open and secret voting employed; A5, reaching a majority; A6, secret v. open voting discussed; 9.A1, p.m. dislocable by leg.; A2, and by constitutive authority; A3, grounds for dislocation, same as for leg.; 12.A1, dislocation of p.m. by leg. and by constitutive authority as security for app. apt.; A l, dislocation of p.m. on accepting other office in state, as security for pg 569app. apt.; A l, location system as security for p.m. through checks to arbitrary appointment; IX.3.A16–17, U.S. practice and location and dislocation of heads of executive depts.; 4.A44, submodes of location: allective and compulsive; A44, ex. of conductive and compulsorily procurative fs.; A44, bissubmodes of location listed; 5.A4, power of dislocation, necessary to subordination; 13.A2–3, term of service and arrangements for dislocation, minister v. legislator; 15.A4, opulence and avoidance of dislocation; 16.A1, location system established at public expense in all subdepts. to max. apt. and min. expense; A2, and collateral benefit of instruction; A3, leading features indicated: choice from number of proposed candidates by p.m. ; moral restriction on his choice by p.o. trib.; app. apt. of candidates certified by judges; competition for public service at least expense among equals or near equals on scale of apt.; risk to reputation of p.m. if wrong choice is made; power of dislocation separate from power of location; dislocative power a check to arbitrary patronage; A4, preparation period v. consummation period; A5–6, defined; A7, courses of instruction increasing degree of app. apt.; A8, commencement of courses of instruction, times appointed by leg.; A9, those reaping benefit from courses of instruction preferred in location over those without acquired apt., as security for app. apt.; A10, leg. to have made and published office calendar, containing list of positions; A l l, general headings: situations of talent, simple trust, trust and talent; A12, situations of talent defined; A13, situations of simple trust defined, examples given; A14, situations of talent and trust defined; A15, talent requiring situations and requisite talents, examples given; A16, each individual to be entered on locable list prior to admission to office; A17, qualification judicatory to determine those qualified for entry on locable list; A18, composition of judicatory; A19, suppositions of judicatory: returns made to advertisements; need for places to be filled ascertained; sufficient supply of funds determined; sufficient time for instruction elapsed; A20–1, mode of procedure of qualification judicatory; A22–32, decree of judicatory formed by secret and open modes of voting; A33, comparative apt. of instructors exhibited in ranking table; A34, leg. will limit topics for interrogation regarding moral apt.; A34, judges, quasi-jurymen, and competitors (with permission) may interrogate; A34, irregularities of sexual appetite, prohibited subject of inquiry; A35, until leg. limits topics, unlimited liberty of interrogation; A35, may be limited by majority of judges or at instance of candidate; A35, responsibility for false statements indicated; A36, results of scrutiny entered in candidate's character book; A37, app. Moral apt. not subject of voting, but results available to each locator; A38, results of voting process framed, printed, and published by registrar; A38–9, opinative decree and imperative decree; A40, no candidate refused entry on locable list on grounds of intellectual apt., unless by express decree of majority of judges; A41, record of moral inaptitude printed and published by registrar; A42, advertisement for instructors; A43, questions for prospective instructors, examples given; A44, object of advertisement; A45, government's share of expense, capital v. periodic allowance; A46, government expense of capital for instruction limited; A47, legislators to make money for instructors dependent on number of pupils and strenuousness of exertion; A48, leg. to see that cost of remuneration of instructors is borne by pupils and relatives; A49–50, extra remuneration, when necessary, examples given; A51, leg. to regulate extra remuneration of instructors; A52, no public remuneration of instructors to be larger than that received for subsistence by lowest paid class of labourers; pg 570A53, no allowance for lodging and diet of pupils; A54, disgust of opulent at sight of indigent, grounds for clothing allowance for pupils; A55–6, leg. To make arrangements for examinations; A55, examination appointing day v. examination day; A55–6, examination appointing advertisement; A57, consummation period, day of commencement; A58, and preparation period; A59, when instruction available, no one is placed on locable list without it; A59, those already in office excepted; A60, leg. to make arrangements for examination of app. moral apt.; A61, use of chance v. choice in examination system; A62, responses and exhibitions, tokens of app. apt.; A62, and ex. Of correspondent fs. by examiners; A63, information needed antecedent to responses and exhibitions; A64, mode of procedure for elicitation of responses; A64, use of question books; A65–6, not all information to be tested; A67, use of lot to exclude partiality in choice of questions; A67, mode of procedure; A68, arrangements of questions; A69, drawing out of question tickets; A69n, choice v. chance in English practice, especially in jury trials; A70, procedure applicable to exhibitions; A71–8, use of lottery discussed; 17.A1, office competition process, p.m. to advertise for offers; A1–4, A54, reductional v. emptional v. compound bidding, defined and distinguished; A5, only those tried by qualification judicatory locable; A6, leg. to make arrangements for pecuniary security by locatee for positions of trust and talent and trust; A7, position of minister involves talent and trust; A8, instrument of location, required; A9, headings listed; A10, distribution of exemplars; A11, leg. To consider further checks on mislocation; A12, minister to advertise for his own subordinates; A13, and location instrument; A13, leg. may add to headings of location instrument; A14, in position of simple trust, inferior talent no bar, and preference given on bidding and pecuniary security; A14, self-seated v. extra-seated property as pecuniary security; A15, leg. may arrange for property as pecuniary security to be inalienable in hands of possessor; A16, minimum age for location; A17–18, exceptions for offices in army and navy; A19, leg. to consider differences in grades in subdepts. for bidding in competition system; A20, attention given to pain of humiliation if superordinate and subordinate reverse positions; A20, distinguished from rise of other persons above functionary; A21, initiative and confirmative locators; A21, minister, the initiative locator; A21, A31, p.m., the confirmative; A21, leg. To make exceptions; A22, distance may require temporarily initiative locator in addition to minister; A23, examples where app.; A24–6, and army subdept.; A27, and navy subdept.; A29–30, and foreign relation subdept.; A31&n, locative f., mode of ex. and avoidance of suspension; A32, p.m. to give reasons for substitution of another locable; A33–4, deputes permanent must be chosen from locable list; A35, location instrument for deputes; A36, provision for exemplars; A37, mislocation, responsibility assigned; A38, no act performed by mislocatee invalid; A39, reason given; A40, examples given; A41, all profit from wrong to be divested; 17.A42–58, contribution of the employment of the competition principle, in subordination to apt. manifestation system; A43–4, reasons given; A43, deduced from greatest happiness principle; A45, English practice, general opinion that price of commodities should be min. through competition; A46, reluctance of statesmen to apply competition principle to their own labours; A46, only will do so when energy of people is troublesome; A47, why, at present, the expense of official labour is max. and apt. min.; A48, especially where education, remuneration, and location are in hands of ruling few; A49, pecuniary competition v. gratuitous pg 571service; A50, objections to public examination system and pecuniary competition listed and answered: (i) A51, timid merit excluded; A52, unopulence as a cause of apt.; (ii) A53, unopulent excluded and thus equality violated; (iii) A54, venality established; (iv) A55, liberality excluded; (v) A56–8, depredation increased by indigence of functionary; (vi) A59, apt. follows opulence; 18.A1, modified v. unmodified location; A1–3, defined and distinguished; A2, modes of modified location, listed; A4, every minister at all times dislocable by p.m.; A5, also by leg.; A6, dislocation by constitutive authority; A6, security against undue dislocation; A7, minister not dislocable by sentence or decree of a judge; A8–10, reasons given; 19.A10, arbitrary v. judicial dislocation and security of functionary; A12, pecuniary competition and no increase in remuneration while in office; A15, leg. to apply location system to suitable subordinate positions; A16, subordinates located with initiative f. ex. by minister and consummative f. ex. by p.m.; A17, considerations of distance; A18, A19&n, securities in filling vacancies; A21, A23–5, A27, repetition of qualification examination and pecuniary competition in filling vacancies; A26, qualification examination and pecuniary competition only applicable to situations of talent; A40, all subordinates dislocable by minister; A40–1, exceptions and restrictions noted; A42, leg. to determine occasions when distance requires suspension by subordinate to minister pending decision by minister regarding dislocation; A43, examples given; 20.A8, dislocation impossible for quasi-insubordination; A25, dislocation and non-compliance by subordinate to direction of superordinate; 21.A4, A8, abuse of power of dislocation and oppression; A8, dislocation through oppression; A14, oppressor subject to dislocation as directly-applying remedy; A37, dislocation judicatory, where held; A38, exceptions; A39, decrees, options open; A40, uses of decrees: securities against oppression and opportunities to clear reputation; A41–2, functionary's ex. of fs. not impeded, as decrees are not obligatory; A43, minister to give effect to decrees or to transfer subordinate or superordinate; A44, simple dislocation of functionaries, subordinate to minister, only by minister, p.m., leg.; A48, dislocation instrument required for dislocation or modified dislocation as indirectly applying remedy against oppression; A49, exceptions; A50, dislocation instrument: headings for simple dislocation; A51, resignation in place of dislocation, not acceptable for deficiencies in moral apt. but acceptable otherwise; A52, resignation also applicable where no deficiency in app. apt., examples given; A53, minutes of record of decree to be attached to dislocation instrument; A54, application of instrument to suspension, headings of entry; A55–6, preventing suspension becoming de facto dislocation; A59, evidence to warrant dislocation; A60, application of instrument to permanent transference, headings of entry; A61, temporary transference, headings of entry; A64, permanent transference to inferior grades, headings of entry; A65, temporary transference to inferior grades, headings of entry; A68, definitive stoppage of promotion, headings of entry; A69, temporary stoppage of promotion, headings of entries; A70, publicity max. in all proceedings; A71, exception for secrecy in time of war; 25.A1, power of location and dislocation and security for app. apt.; A3, dislocation of ministers by leg. and constitutive authority, as securities for app. apt.; A3, qualification judicatory and pecuniary competition as securities for app. apt.; A3, dislocability of ministers upon accepting another office, or upon accepting office, honour, gift, from foreign government as security for app. apt.; A26, A28, location and dislocation and responsibility pg 572of ministers for subordinates; A32, dislocative power of ministers and inaptitude of functionaries; 26, A38, pecuniary competition and arrangements for living accommodation of ministers discussed. See DEPUTE(S); DISLOCATIVE FUNCTION; ENGLISH PRACTICE; LEGISLATOR'S INAUGURAL DECLARATION; LOCATIVE FUNCTION; LOT; PROMOTION; PUBLIC OPINION TRIBUNAL; RELOCATION; SELF-SUPPLETIVE FUNCTION; SUSPENSION; TRANSFER; VOTING
LOCATIVE FUNCTION: V.2.A2, ex. by constitutive authority; A3–4, ex. In sending deputies to leg. and members to sublegs.; 3.A1, locative f., how ex. by constitutive authority in relation to leg.; A2–3, and sublegs.; VIII.2.A3, ex. by p.m. in relation to ministers; IX.4.A44, ex. by ministers collectively in regard to persons; A44, defined; A44–5, locative v. procurative fs.; A44, submodes of location: conductive and compulsorily procurative fs.; 17.A31&n, locative f., mode of ex., and avoidance of suspension; 25.A26, and responsibility of ministers for subordinates. See CONSTITUTIVE AUTHORITY; DISLOCATIVE FUNCTION; ELECTION CODE; LOCATION AND DISLOCATION
LONGEVITY: IX.19.A14, no increase in remuneration for longevity. See SENIORITY; SUBORDINATE AND SUPERORDINATE
LOT: VIII.8.A5, use of lot to break tie in election of p.m. by leg.; IX.16.A25n, possible use where equality among candidates; 16.A61–78, use of lot as instrument of selection; A67, use of lot to exclude partiality in examination; A67, mode of procedure; A68, arrangements of questions; A69, drawing out of question-tickets; A71, other uses of lot besides in location system; A72, in distribution of benefits, examples given; A73, location of burdens, as for military and quasi-jury service; A74, where burdens not divisible; A75, in punishment; A76, chance and choice used in association; A77–8, lottery constituted: by contract of parties v. law with absence of consent; A78, government lottery v. individual lottery; 19.A36, lot preferred to choice in corrupt system of government as basis of promotion. See LOCATION AND DISLOCATION; VOTING
LOTTERY: See LOT
MAJORITY(IES): VI.26.A2, legislative authority belongs to majority present at meeting; A3, effect on majority where members wrongly excluded; VIII.8.A5, comparative v. absolute majorities in election of p.m. by leg.
MANDATE(S): See LAW OR MANDATE
MANIFOLD WRITING MODE: VIII.2.A15&n, use of, with exemplars; lO.Al&n, A2, use of, in registration system; A3–4, saving expense and security against falsification; A5, use by judiciary; A6, as security against destruction of judicial documents; 11.A3, manifold writing system and publicity; A12, manifold writing system v. printing press as instrument of internal publicity; IX.5.A24, min. expense in transmission of information; 7.2nd.All, A19, use of mimographical mode of registration; 8.A35, uniformity of paper in manifold writing system; A36, v. printing for cheapness and legibility. See EXEMPLARS; MIMOGRAPHICAL MODE OF REGISTRATION; PUBLICITY AND SECRECY; REGISTRATION SYSTEM; STATISTIC FUNCTION
MASS(ES): IX.25.A48, governed millions as a mass
MAXIMIZATION AND MINIMIZATION: (i) Max. happiness/happiness of greatest number: II.A1, A13, A14, A16, A23. VI.2.A1, 29.A43, VII.2, (ii) Max. app. apt. and/or min. expense: II.A2, A12, A16, A17, A19, VII.2, 4, pg 573VIII. 12.A l, IX.3.A2, A23. A31, 4.A38, 5.A22, A24, A38, 7.2nd.A24, 4th.A31, 15.A1–3, A5, A6, 16.A1, A3, A42, A47, 17.A50, 19.A25, A27, 25.A3, 26.A20n, (iii) Max. good and/or min. evil: II.A13, VII.2, VIII.11.A8, IX.1.A1, A2, 4.A54, 7.1st.A3, A5, A17, A19, 21.A25, 24.A9, 26.A2, A4, A43, (iv) Other: II.A16&n, A23, IV.A14, VI.21.A2, 25.A28, 27.A5, A21, A29, A35, A38, A47, A48, 31.A2, A34, VII.2, VIII.11.A2, A3, IX.4.A17, A43, 5.A36, 7.1st.A4, 8.A24, 16.A20, A61, 17.A45, A47, A53, A54, 19.A31, 21.A29, A70, 23.A13, 25.A42, 26.A19. See APTITUDE; EXPENSE; GOOD AND EVIL; HAPPINESS
MELIORATION SUGGESTIVE FUNCTION: V.5.A4, ex. by p.o. trib.; 6.A1, all members of human species have right to ex. melioration suggestive f.; VI.28.A16, and redressing wrongs by judges; VIII.10.A6, use of exemplars in ex. by justice minister; A7, melioration suggestive f. not inhibited by destruction of useless documents; 12.A1, ex. by p.o. trib. as security for app. apt. of p.m.; IX.4.A61, ex. by ministers collectively; A61, purposes: reform and improvement; 12.A1, ministers to draw up melioration suggesting report and transmit to p.m.; fs. included in melioration suggestive f.: A2, indicative; A3, ratiocinative; A4, eventually emendative f.; A5, exemplars, how disposed; A6, benefits from this f. depend on ex. of other fs.; 19.A7, leg. to determine which grades to ex. melioration suggestive f.; 24.A5, ex. of melioration suggestive f. and securing the Pannomion against deterioration; A6, in every situation subordinate to minister, belongs the contested interpretation reporting f. as well as the melioration suggestive f.; 25.A3, ex. by p.o. trib. As security for app. apt. of ministers; A23, importance of access to register books for ex. See EVENTUALLY EMENDATIVE FUNCTION
MENDACITY AND VERACITY: VI.27.A48, mendacity max. in English practice in rules of evidence in judiciary; A50, mendacity and veracity in eliciting evidence by House of Commons; A54, veracity of evidence elicited by monarch's commissions; VIII.12.A3, problem of mendacity and secret informers of minister's misconduct or inaptitude; IX.10.A2, mendacity licence mentioned
MERCEDE-LOCATIVE FUNCTION: See ELIMINATIVE FUNCTION
MERCHANT(S): IX.25.A47, mercantile subclass and particular and sinister interest
MERIT: IX.15.A34, merit, natural honour, and remuneration discussed; 17.A51, timid merit and public examination system, objection answered; A51, timidity may accompany, but is not a cause of merit; A55, liberality no proof of merit; 19.A14, fallacious notion of moral merit; A37, for meritorious service, no augmentation of emolument necessary; A38, extra remuneration for meritorious service, private v. public practice; A39, extra merit only basis of extra remuneration. See APTITUDE; DIGNITY AND FACTITIOUS DIGNITY; HONOUR, NATURAL AND FACTITIOUS; LOCATION AND DISLOCATION; REMUNERATION
MESSAGE(S): VIII.1.A9, in U.S. practice, president communicates with congress by message; 3.A1–2, communication between p.m. and leg. by message only, unless invited or ordered by leg. to appear personally; fs. ex. by p.m. in sending messages; A3–4, informative f.; A5, indicative f. ; A6–7, initiative f.; A8, p.m. responsible for neglect of fs.; A9, communication with leg. usually through minister; A10, in ex. of statistic f., p.m. to send annual messages to leg. on general condition of state
METHODIZATION FUNCTION: VI.27.A39, ex. in preparation of legislation pg 574enquiry report. See LAW OR MANDATE; LEGISLATION ENQUIRY JUDICATORY; WRITTEN INSTRUMENTS
METROPOLIS: VI.2.A9, foreign government to sue in judicatory in metropolis for breach of contract; 23.A15, metropolis of state, seat of leg.; A22, many in metropolis to serve as deputes; IX.21.A37, A77, judicatory in metropolis to be used, but problem of distance
MIGRATION: VII.8, no barrier in state to immigration or emigration
MILITARY SERVICE: IX.16.A73, and use of lot in selection for; 19.A29–31, distribution of power, grade and emolument non-military v. military situations. See ARMY MINISTER; ARMY SUBDEPARTMENT; NAVY MINISTER; NAVY SUBDEPARTMENT
MIMOGRAPHICAL MODE OF REGISTRATION: IX.7.2nd.A7, also named receptacular or mimetic mode; A7, explained; A8, usefulness indicated; A9, subdepts. where most applicable; A10, present usage; A11, and manifold system; A12, use in describing not only original amount but also changes in quantity of articles in public store; A13, subdept. where applicable; A14, application to store of written instruments; A15–23, applicability described; A24, use in ex. of applicative, custoditive, and procurative fs.; 8.A11, mimographical documents indicate need for issuing requisition instruments; A12, indicate stock in hand for entry on requisition instruments; A14, mimographical documents serve as checks on requisition. See EXEMPLARS; MANIFOLD WRITING MODE; REGISTRATION SYSTEM; STATISTIC FUNCTION
MINISTER(S): IV.A13, one minister for each subdept.; V.2.A3n, deputy of minister called minister depute; A5, ministers and deputes dislocable by constitutive authority; VI.29.A9–10, consultation with ministers over proposed ordinances by members of leg.; 31.A1, all-pervading system of securities applied to ministers; A42, ministers' securities for app. apt. and leg.; VIII.1.A4, logical field of service of ministers; 2.A2, ministers and p.m.'s ex. Of directive f.; A3, ministers located by p.m.; A5, and dislocated by p.m.; 3.A7, ministers and ex. of initiative f. by p.m. in relation to leg.; A9, usual communication by p.m. through ministers to leg.; IX.1.A1, ministers collectively, ends aimed at; A2, app. good and correspondent evil specified; 2.A1, ministers under p.m. enumerated; A2, each minister has one or more subdepts.; A3, ministers collectively v. individual ministers; A4, A6, minister v. subminister; A5, minister v. p.m.; A7, p.m. v. subprime minister; A8, allotment of ministers; A9, A10, potentially united subdepts.; [3, See SINGLE AND MANY SEATEDNESS] [4, See FUNCTIONS] [5, See SUBORDINATE AND SUPERORDINATE] [6t See SELF-SUPPLETIVE FUNCTION] [7, See STATISTIC FUNCTION] [8, See REQUISITIVE FUNCTION] [9, See INSPECTIVE FUNCTION] [10, See INFORMATION; OFFICIALLY INFORMATIVE FUNCTION] [11, See INFORMATION ELICITATIVE FUNCTION] [12, See MELIORATION SUGGESTIVE FUNCTION] [13, See TERM OF SERVICE] [14, See ATTENDANCE AND NON-ATTENDANCE] [15, See REMUNERATION] [16–18, See LOCATION AND DISLOCATION] [19, See SUBORDINATE AND SUPERORDINATE] [20, See INSUBORDINATION] [21, See OPPRESSION] [22, See EXTORTION] [23, See PECULATION] [24, See LEGISLATION REGARDING FUNCTIONS] [25, See SECURITIES] [26, See ARCHITECTURE]. See ARMY; DOMAIN; EDUCATION; ELECTION; FINANCE; FOREIGN RELATION; HEALTH; INDIGENCE RELIEF; INTERIOR COMMUNICATION; LEGISLATION; NAVY; PREVENTIVE SERVICE; AND TRADE MINISTERS. See also pg 575CORRUPTION; EVIDENCE; MIMOGRAPHICAL MODE OF REGISTRATION; REGISTRATIVE FUNCTION; REGISTRATION SYSTEM; OPPRESSION; VOTING
MINUTATION: IX.21.A20, as indirectly applying remedy in obviation of oppression by administrative functionaries
MINUTATIVE FUNCTION: See REGISTRATIVE FUNCTION
MIXED MONARCHY: VI.20.A12–17, effect of non-attendance of legislators in mixed monarchies; 31.A15, A36–41&n, and reception to the use of securities for app. apt.; IX.25.A38, and abuse of ex. of extraordinary power; A48, power-holding class in democracy v. mixed monarchy. See ARISTOCRACY; ENGLISH PRACTICE; MONARCHY
MONARCHY: II.A23–4, monarchy and responsibility; VI.2.A4, and coronation oath; 22.A5, and origin of systems of representation; 24.A13, as convener of leg.; 25.A20, and corruption; 31.A25, A31–5, pure monarchy and reception to use of securities for app. apt.; A34–5, and reception in pure aristocracy; VIII.5.A4, representative democracy changed to monarchy and aristocracy where leg. fails to elect p.m.; 7.A2, exclusion of monarch and relations of monarch from eligibility for location as p.m.; IX.3.A24, A27. arbitrary rule of; 15.A35, monarchy and factitious dignity; A45, reward mislocated in toto, natural and habitual in monarchy; 17.A56–7, monarchy, opulence, and depredation; 20.A12, absolute monarchy and secret institutions; 25.A51, in absolute monarchies, dislocation arbitrary; A53, aristocracy's dependence on monarchy; 26.A40, representative democracy v. monarchy and expense of moving from place to place; A48, in monarchy, all but one become slaves; A49–52, greatest happiness requires residence of functionaries, including monarch, located where their service can be of most use. See ARISTOCRACY; ENGLISH PRACTICE; MIXED MONARCHY
MONEY: VI.25.A20, money and money's worth as matter of corruption; VII.3, appetite for money to be avoided by legislators; 4, money gained by false pretences to be avoided by legislators; IX.4.A11, money and movables-atlarge; fs. regarding money: A56, statistic; A57, registrative; A58, publicative; A59, officially informative or report making; A61, melioration suggestive; 5.A19, accountableness at large and money; 23.A13, rules for receipt and disbursement of money listed; A14, peculation, in the ex. of the procurative, reparative, eliminative, and venditive fs. more dangerous, because easier, than malpractice with money. See CORRUPTION; EXPENSE; PECULATION; REMUNERATION; STATISTIC FUNCTION
MORAL: (i) Moral apt. and inaptitude: II.A22, VI.24.A1, A18, 25.A19, A32, A33, A50, 28.A8, A16, 31.A1, A24, A38, A41n, A43, VII.2, IX.3.A3, 16.A12, 25.A l, A31; (ii) Moral responsibility: II.A24, VI.23.A26, 25.A49, IX.16.A3; (iii) Moral rights: IX.4.A9n; (iv) Moral sanction: II.A20, VIIn, IX.20.A18, 21.A26, 25.A1, A54; (v) Moral obligation: V.5.A5; (vi) Other: V.4.A3, subjects of dramatic entertainment of a political or moral nature; VI.25.A26, in moral world, attraction of corruption is like attraction of gravity; Vlln, legislator's inaugural declaration as moral code; Vlln, insincerity as moral disease; IX.16.A3, morally binding right; 19.A14, moral merit, fallacious notion; 21.A21, rules of deportment analysed as rules of morality ; 25.A54, good manners and good morals. See APTITUDE; DEONTOLOGY; DEPORTMENT; LEGISLATOR'S INAUGURAL DECLARATION; RIGHTS; SANCTION(S); SECURITIES
MOTION(S): VI.29.A1, emendative v. non-emendative proposed ordinances; pg 576A2, if emendative, need to declare it to protect Pannomion; A3, emendative ordinance, directive mode explained; A4, formula for amendments; A5–6, reeditive mode explained; A7, every member of leg. has right to propose motions; A7, motions discussed, when seconded; A8, remedies for ill-considered or time-wasting motions; A9, obviation of confusion from numerous motions, remedies proposed; A9–10, consultation with ministers over proposed ordinances; 31.A44, apt form of new laws and securities for app. intellectual apt.; IX.24.A1, motions made by ministers in ex. of initiative f. in legislative assembly; A4, member's motions and ministers. See LAW OR MANDATE; LEGISLATURE
MOTIVE(S): (i) IX.25.A1, motives as subject matter for securities for app. apt.; A l, motives create interests; (ii) VI.31.A20&n, A21, pure and impure motives; (iii) other. VI.23.A16, A25, IX.26.A33. See INTEREST(S); PLEASURE AND PAIN
MOVABLE(S) AND IMMOVABLE(S): See IMMOVABLE(S) AND MOVABLE(S)
NAMES: See LANGUAGE
NATURE AND NATURAL: V.5.A5, natural v. factitious reward; VII.3, inalterable nature exposes one to sinister influence; 9, natural or acquired talents and scale of comparison; IX.4.A9, natural or simple; A9, simple or natural right created by absence of obligation; 15.A 18–20, natural honour and reward; A44, naturally extravasated remuneration; A44, A46, natural v. artificial extravasated remuneration; 17.A47, natural talents and natural place; 19.A29, emolument considered natural accompaniment to grade and power in military service; 21.A1, human nature and suffering wrong in administrative dept.; 22.A5, history and human nature in English practice
NAVY MINISTER: IX.2.A1, serves under p.m.; 9.A7, joint visits in ex. Of inspective f.; 16.A15, requisite talents for position; 19.A41, and power of dislocation. See MILITARY SERVICE; MINISTER(S); NAVY SUBDEPARTMENT
NAVY SUBDEPARTMENT: VI.27.A15, functionaries in field and powers of legislation enquiry judicatory; VIII.2.A9, A13, A14–16, ex. of imperative f. by p.m. as commander-in-chief; 11.A6–7, where publicity may be harmful; A15–17, and time limits on secrecy; IX.2.A10, potentially joined with army and preventive service subdepts.; Al0n, navy courts martial and judiciary; 5.A40–1, number of functionaries in highest grades, English v. U.S. practice; 9.A4, offices to be visited in ex. of inspective f.; 11.A9, extraction of information for defence purposes; 16.A15, talent-requiring situations and requisite talents, examples given; 17.A18, minimum age for service as lowest grade of officer; A23, A27, need for temporarily initiative location; 20.A l, legislator to consider applicability of arrangements for obviation of insubordination, oppression and extortion to military branch of navy services; 21.A20, leg. To determine whether variation in rules of deportment are necessary for navy subdept. as indirectly-applying remedies against oppression; A27, military codes and repression of wrongs between functionaries; A49, use of dislocation instruments. See MILITARY SERVICE; NAVY MINISTER
NEWSPAPER(S): See PRESS
OATH: VI.2.A4, monarch's oath, contracts, and oppression; 27.A50, use of oath as security for verity in eliciting evidence; A50–1, House of Lords v. House pg 577of Commons in use of oath; VHn, legislator's inaugural declaration, not an oath
OBLIGATION: See DUTY AND OBLIGATION
OCCURRENCES: IX.4.A12, fictitious entities designated occurrences; A13, states and motions, names of occurrences which are subject of registrative f.; A14, interior and exterior occurrences defined; A15, important and unimportant occurrences defined; A16, relevant and irrelevant occurrences defined; A17, relevant occurrences to be max., irrelevant min.; fs. Regarding occurrences: A56, statistic; A57, registrative; A58, publicative; A59, officially informative or report making. See FUNCTION(S); STATISTIC FUNCTION
OFFICE(S): IX.26.A7, use of publicity and secrecy varies between office and office; A16, offices defined. See ARCHITECTURE
OFFICE CALENDAR: IX.16.A10, made and published by leg.; A10, contains an all-comprehensive list of positions; A l l, general heads: situations of talent, situations of simple trust, situations of talent and trust; A12–14, defined and distinguished; 25.A8, convicted lists to be inserted in office calendar; A9, arrangements for new series of convicted lists. See LOCATION AND DISLOCATION
OFFICIALLY INFORMATIVE FUNCTION: IX.4.A59, ex. by ministers collectively in regard to persons, things, money, and occurrences; A59, defined; 10.A11, information of relevant occurrences to be furnished to leg. and p.m.; A12, exceptions made by leg. with regard to encumbrance and expense; A13, subordinate functionaries to supply information to ministers; A14, arrangements to offices other than a grade superior made by leg.; A15, officially informative f. and information-elicitive f.; A16–17, and information receptive f.; A17–19, presumption of receipt of information; A20, why distinct f. needed; A20, officially informative f. v. registrative f.; A21, officially informative f. ex. in every state; A22, no comprehensive system in English practice; A23, consequences stated; A24, special need for information from distant provinces; A25, deficiencies in English practice. See INFORMATION; INFORMATIVE FUNCTION
OMNICOMPETENCE: VI.1.A1, supreme leg. is omnicompetent. See LEGISLATURE
OPERATIVE: IV.A6, consists of legislative, administrative and judicial depts.; A6, operative v. constitutive
OPINATIVE FUNCTION: IX.21.A39, opinative v. imperative fs. See IMPERATIVE FUNCTION
OPPRESSION: VI.2.A4, justification of oppression and use of oath by monarch; 27.A27, oppression and non-attendance of deputies due to participation in elicitation process; A37, and secrecy in legislative enquiry judicatory; A56, aristocratical oppression in English practice; 31.A31, A33, oppression and pure monarchy; A34, oppression and pure aristocracy; VII.4, waste and corruption leading to oppression; 6, oppression and tax on judicial services; 12, oppressive power and temptation of leg. to encroach on subordinate authorities; IX.9.A3, complaints regarding oppression taken during ex. of inspective f.; 15.A7, oppression and expenditure of public funds; 20.A1, legislator to consider applicability of arrangements for obviation of oppression to military branch of army and navy services; A2, A21, securities for functionaries and non-functionaries regarding oppression; 21.A1, functionaries v. non-functionaries, and functionaries as subordinates, superordinates and coordinates—pg 578all stand exposed to wrong by human agency; A2, insubordination v. quasiinsubordination v. oppression; A2, oppression and extortion, defined and distinguished; A4, oppressors- and oppressees defined and distinguished; A5, suitor as oppressee, examples given; A6, inspectee as oppressee, examples given; A7, evidence-holder, as oppressee, examples given; A8, functionary as oppressee, examples given; A9, remedies for oppression non-functionary as oppressee; A9, generally-applying remedies v. specially applying remedies; specially applying remedies: A10, directly v. indirectly applying remedies; A11-19, directly applying remedies, cases given; A11–17, where oppressor is a functionary inferior to minister, minister may be special judge; A13–14, remedies listed; A15–16, power to invoke assistance of judge immediate of subdistrict, reasons given; A17, fs. of judges; A18, where oppressor is minister, p.m. to be special judge; A19, where p.m. is oppressor, legislation penal judicatory serves as special judicatory; A20, indirectly-applying remedies, listed; A21, rules of deportment analysed as rules of ethics; A22, where penal code applicable; A23, enforceability of rules; A24, and importance of system of judicial procedure; A25, English system of procedure contrasted; A26, rules of negative-effective benevolence, not enforceable with advantage in all states where procedure system aims at injustice; A27, military codes as codes of deportment; A28–31, English practice; A32, reasons for not inserting codes of good manners into constitutional code; A33, problem of adequate penal code in most nations; A34, remedies for oppression, functionary as oppressee, same remedies as for suitor; A35, remedies for abuse of ex. Of directive f.; A36, remedies for abuse of dislocative f.: directly and indirectly applying; A36, with directly applying remedies judge has no power of relocation; A37, judicatory held in metropolis, reasons given; A38, exceptions to be established by leg.; A39, decrees, options open; A40, uses of decrees: as securities against oppression and opportunities to clear reputations; A41–2, functionary's ex. of fs. not impeded, as decrees are not obligatory acts; A43, minister to give effect to decrees or to transfer subordinate or superordinate; A44, simple dislocation of functionary, only by minister, p.m. or leg.; A45, only minister, p.m., or leg. may stop promotion of functionary; A46, only minister, p.m. and leg. to effect transfer without consent of functionary; A47, suspension may be effected by immediate or any other superordinate of functionary, reasons given; A48, dislocation instrument required for dislocation and modified dislocation as indirectly applying remedy against oppression; A49, exceptions; A50, dislocation instrument: headings for simple dislocation; A51–2, dislocation and resignation; A53, minutes of record of the decree to be attached to dislocation instrument; A54, application of dislocation instrument to suspension, heads of entries; A55–6, rules for time of suspension and renewal; A57, termination of suspension, causes listed; A58, minutes of record attached to instrument; A59, when dislocation or suspension warranted; A60, permanent transfer to not inferior grade, headings of entries; A61, temporary transfer, headings of entries; A62–3, discussed; A64, permanent transfer to inferior grade, headings of entry; A65, temporary transfer to inferior grade, headings of entry; A66, word 'transference' preferred to 'degradation' ; A67, temporary transference to inferior grade as punishment; A68, definitive stoppage of promotion, headings of entry; A69, temporary stoppage of promotion, headings of entry; A70, publicity max. in all proceedings; A71, exceptions for secrecy in time of war; A72, leg. To determine when special appellate judge to invoke assistance of ordinary judge; pg 579A73–6, arrangements for exemplars of records and instruments; A77, further considerations for leg. regarding extent of territory, distances from the metropolis, facility of communication, number of grades in subdepts.; 22.A2, extortion as 'predatory oppression' ; A3, how extortion and oppression may be combined; 25.A47, peerage and oppression; A54, p.o. trib. in English practice checks oppression in spite of the law; A57, law and judiciary no security against oppression in English practice. See CORRUPTION; DEPREDATION; ENGLISH PRACTICE; EXTORTION; PECULATION; SECURITIES
OPULENCE: II.A16n, A23, opulence and pecuniary responsibility discussed; V.6.A2, opulence and defence against defamation; VI.23.A24–6, the opulent and deputy's substitutes; A54–5, effect on opulent of pecuniary punishment; VII.4, opulent and indigent and expense of gratification of tastes; 6, effect of tax on judicial services on rich and poor; 8, legislators not to add to opulence of state; 9, opulence and impartiality by legislators; VIII.11.A6, open voting in elections favours few and rich at expense of many; IX.16.A54, disgust of opulent at sight of indigent, grounds for clothing allowance for pupils; IX.17.A52, unopulence as cause of exertion and apt., discussed; A53, unopulent excluded by pecuniary competition system, discussed; A56, opulent have greater probability of depredation than unopulent; A56–68, reasons given; A59, apt. does not increase with increase in pay and opulence; 23.A12, wealth and exemption from suspicion of delinquency, denied; 25.A44, by opulence men rendered indolent; A46, opulence and motives for mental exertion. See FEW AND MANY
PACKING: VI.27.A54, packed witnesses and packed judges in English practice; IX.16.A69n, packing juries, chance, and choice
PANNOMION: Title n, defined; Title n, constitutional code, first in importance in Pannomion; VI.29.A2, Pannomion and proposed emendative ordinances; A2n, Pannomion, Greek origin of term; A3–4, Pannomion and emendation in directive mpde; A5, Pannomion and emendation in reeditive mode; IX.24.A4, A5, A7–9, ministers, leg., and improving and maintaining the Pannomion; 25.A39, Pannomion and ex. of extraordinary power. See CONSTITUTIONAL CODE
PANOPTICON: IX.26.A20n, prison system discussed
PARTY(IES): VI.31.A37, two competing parties in mixed monarchy; IX.10.A22, party in office and control of information in English practice
PATRONAGE: VI.23.A26, patronage and deputy's substitute, no corruption in this case; 25.A20, patronage as matter of corruption; VII.8, patronage, corruption, and dominion over other states; 12, patronage and encroachment by leg. on subordinate authorities; IX.16.A3, dislocative power a check to arbitrary patronage by p.m.; 17.A43, patronage and undue benefit avoided with pecuniary competition principle in situations of simple trust; A53, patronage, opulence, and corruptive influence; A54, competition system min. patronage and the relish for money; A55, liberality, venality, and patronage; 19.A36, patronage of super ordinates in corrupt governments. See CORRUPTION
PECULATION: IX.15.A7, liberality and peculation; 20.A2, securities for functionaries and non-functionaries regarding peculation; 23.A1, peculation defined as indirect way of trustee obtaining undue pecuniary profit; A2, trust violated: private v. political; A2, political trust: public v. semi-public; pg 580A3, direct modes of making undue profit, examples; A4, theft v. embezzlement; A6, prevention of peculation in ex. of procurative f.; A7, arrangements to question minister's partiality and connections in ex. of procurative f.; A8, but quality and cheapness are main considerations with regard to contracts; A9, with publicity, procurement from friends or relatives would be a security against peculation; A10, grounds for interdiction of such contracts; A11, limitations on remedies; A12, exemption from suspicion of delinquency discussed; A13, in situations of trust, rules for receipt and disbursement of money listed; A14, peculation, in the ex. of the procurative, reparative, eliminative, and venditive fs., more dangerous because easier than malpractice with money; A15, sinister profit by peculation, examples given; A16, importance of recordation, publication, and interrogation powers stressed as bar to peculation. See CORRUPTION; EXTORTION
PENAL CODE: V.6.A2, and defamation; A3–4, and free circulation of political tracts; A4, and criminal evil consciousness; VI.19.A1, and extortion and corruption of legislators; IX.4.A9, and natural v. sanctional rights; 7.6th.A6, and punishment for evil consciousness and negligence, in ex. of statistic f.; 15.A9, and arbitrarily conferred remuneration; 16.A78, and use of lottery; 17.A37, A39, A41, and mislocation; 20.A9, and disturbance by vexation; 21.A9, and generally-applying remedies against oppression; A22, and rules of ethics; A33, and punishment for delinquency; 22.A4, and remedies against extortion; 23.A5, and remedies against peculation; A12, and delinquency
PENSION(S): See REMUNERATION
PEOPLE, THE: See CONSTITUTIVE AUTHORITY
PERSON(S): VI.27.A12, personal v. real evidence; VIII.1.A3, persons and p.m.'s logical field of service; A14, and rules for limiting secrecy; IX.4.A5, persons v. things; A5, real entities comprised of persons and things; A6, fictitious persons v. fictitious things; A6, all fictitious entities comprised of fictitious persons and fictitious things; fs. regarding persons: A44, locative, self-suppletive, directive, dislocative; A56, statistic; A57, registrative; A58, publicative; A59, officially informative or report making; A61, melioration suggestive; 20.A21, physical force against persons; 25.A l, persons and securities for app. apt. See STATISTIC FUNCTION
PLEASURE(S) AND PAIN(S): II.A5, evil defined as pain and loss of pleasure; A8, pain and pleasure in punishment; A10, pleasure as an end and means; A21, pain and punitional responsibility; VII.4, minimum quantity of pain for punishment; IX.17.A20, pain of humiliation, and pain of degradation in location; 25.A1, pleasures and pains as objects of desire and aversion and motives for giving effect to securities; 26.A51, A52, monarch in pursuit of pleasure and residence of functionaries. See GOOD AND EVIL
POLITICAL ECONOMY: IX.16.A15, subject of study for ministers and subordinates; 17.Con.Inst.A5, lectures by John MacCulloch
POPULATION: IX.16.A53, allowance for lodging or diet of pupils rejected as producing population excess
PORTUGAL: II.A24, moral responsibility and England v. Portugal; VI.25.A53n, and Bentham's earlier ideas on leg.
POWER(S): 11.16, sovereign power and subordinate power; A16n, power as matter of reward; A18, powers as fs. of functionaries; IV.A12, many-seatedness and fractionized power; A14, power as remuneration for auxiliaries deputed by self-suppletive f.; V.2.A1–6, powers of constitutive authority; 4.A1, power of p.o. trib. is judicial; A4, p.o. trib. as check to pernicious ex. of power of pg 581government; 6.A2, he who has power and defence against defamation; VI.1.A1, power of supreme leg. is unlimited but checked by securities; A2, past leg. has no power over current one; 2.A2, power of constitutive authority diminished by anti-constitutional ordinances; 19.A1, power added to remuneration and inseparable from office of leg.; 20.A17, and non-attendance of legislators in English practice; A17, power without obligation is despotism; A18, and U.S. practice; 23.A1, deputy has power of location of substitute; A22, power of deputy v. substitute; 25.A5, power and responsibility in relocation; A20, A22, power and corruption; A46, appetite for power and undiscontinued relocability; A48, power of p.m.; A49, checks to his power; A52, power and temporary non-relocability; 27.A2, power of leg. to elicit evidence; A14–16, powers of legislation enquiry judicatory; A27, power of location, exclusion from office, and legislation enquiry judicatory; A37, power afforded by secrecy obviated; A44, powers of House of Commons regarding evidence; A49, power of p.o. trib. in English practice; A50, powers of House of Commons v. judiciary in eliciting evidence; A54, powers of monarch in eliciting evidence; A56, abuse of power in reports; 28.A7, power to create vacancy in leg.; A11, power to redress wrongs; 31.A1, security against abuse of power and app. moral apt.; A3, power of functionaries and greatest happiness principle; A5, arrangements for restraint and security against abuse of power; A13–15, limitations on power not harmful to public service or individuals; A13, ample provision of power of public functionaries in code; A22–3, greater a man's power, greater the propensity to abuse it; A31–3, securities against abuse of power in pure monarchies; A34–5, securities against abuse of power in pure aristocracies; A36–41&n, securities against abuse of power in mixed monarchies; Vlln, power of moral sanction as ex. by p.o. trib.; Vlln, power of legal sanction v. power of p.o. trib.; 3, appetite for power considered; 6, tax on judicial services and power; 7, power of legislators; 8, power and justice in international relations; 9, power and impartiality; 11, the people, only legitimate source of power; 12, appetite for oppressive power and encroachment by leg. on subordinate authorities; 14, power and influence of legislators; VIII.2.A10–11, power and grades of defensive force; Al in, power of president of U.S. as commander-in-chief; 4.A1, p.m. has power of self-supply; A4, power of principal and power of depute; A9, power passing between principal and depute; 6.A2, power of p.m. in relation to leg.; 11.A6, legal power and secret suffrage; A8, tutelary power of p.o. trib., always needed; IX.3.A10, scale of power and delinquency; A17, absolute power of U.S. president over subordinates; A20, arbitrary power constituted by exemption from control; 5.A4, modes of power necessary in subordination: direction, suspension, dislocation, punition, suppletion; A4, modes of power incidentally useful in subordination: transferential and promotionstopping; A4, and corresponding functions; A22. power and money as part of reward; 11.A6–9, power of extracting information; A10, inquisitorial abuse of power; 15.A47, fractional masses of supreme power; 16.A3, dislocative power in number of hands divested of inducement to abuse of power; A3, location system v. arbitrary power of patronage; A3, power of corruption min. in location system; 17.A49, power as factor in the engagement of personal service; A53, powers of office converted to instrument of depredation; A54, abuse of powers and pecuniary competition; 17.Con.Inst.Al, arbitrary power in location before system established; 19.A5, power corresponding to self-suppletive f.; A10, dislocative power and term of service of ministers; pg 582A20, exercise of power and location by p.m.; A22, power of minister's depute to make choice in filling vacancies rejected; A23, power without obligation to repeat qualification examination; A28, scale of directive power and promotion; A29, distribution of power in military v. non-military situations; A29, power as inducement to time and labour; A31, arbitrary power and Russian code; A35, power of unrestrained choice and app. apt.; A36, power converted to poison in corrupt government; A38, power of extraremuneration, benefit to super ordinate; 20.A25, for non-compliance of subordinate, powers of superordinate listed. 21.A2, oppression and power; A4, abuse of power, positive and negative; A13, power and obligation of judges regarding oppression; A15, power to invoke special judges; A16, evidence-elicitation power; A29, power of lawyers at expense of community; A35, abuse of directive power and oppression; A36, abuse of power in ex. Of dislocative f. and oppression; A36, power of relocation not imperative; 22.A1, official power and extortion; 23.A12, abuse of power and exemption from suspicion of delinquency; 25.A1, misuse v. non-use of official powers; A26, power: self-suppletive, suppletive, locative, dislocative, and suspensive, and responsibility for subordinates; A30, subjection to the power of p.o. trib.; A32, subjection to power of legal tribunals; A33, securing responsible and excluding irresponsible ex. of power; A35, delegation of power to ministers by leg. in emergencies prohibited; A36, functionaries and ex. of extraordinary powers; A38, abuse of power in ex. of extraordinary power in mixed monarchy; A39–41, dispensing power discussed; A43, power of legislation and following precedents; A48, power-holding class in representative democracy v. aristocracy ridden monarchy ; A53, support to power howsoever exercised in English practice; 26.A36, interest corresponding to love of power. See AUTHORITY(IES); FUNCTION(S)
PREAPPOINTED EVIDENCE: See EVIDENCE
PRECEDENT(S): IX.25.A43–9, evils of following precedents discussed
PREINTERPRET ATIVE FUNCTION: IX.24.A7, leg. to determine which functionaries under minister to ex. the preinterpretative f. with reference to Pannomion
PRESS, THE: VI.20.A5, publication of absences of legislators in government newspaper; 25.A50, efficiency of p.o. trib. depends on liberty of the press; IX.17.A51, the press and gaining a reputation by intellectual labour; 25, A29, periodical press as medium of p.o. trib. for enquiry into lack of vigilance by superordinate for subordinate; A30, use of press to comment on apt. of functionaries. See PUBLIC OPINION TRIBUNAL
PREVENTIVE SERVICE MINISTER: IX.2.A1, serves under p.m.; 9.A7, joint visits and ex. of inspective f.; 26.A47, ex. of directive f. over military guard in protection of public property. See MINISTER(S); PREVENTIVE SERVICE SUBDEPARTMENT
PREVENTIVE SERVICE SUBDEPARTMENT: VIII.11.A6–7, and evils of publicity; IX.2.A10, potentially joined with army and navy subdepts.; 9.A4, offices to be visited in ex. of inspective f. See PREVENTIVE SERVICE MINISTER
PRICE(S): IX.17.A45, general opinion that prices of labour and commodities in general should be min. through competition, in English practice; A46, application by rulers of competition principle to price of their own labour
PRIME MINISTER: IV.A13, one p.m. in state; V.2.A3n, deputy of p.m. called prime minister depute; A5, p.m. dislocable by constitutive authority; pg 583VI.25.A19, p.m., corruption and undiscontinued relocability; A48, continuity of p.m., as security against corruption; A49, and other securities; 28.A1, subject to trial by legislation penal judicatory; A8, and impartial trial by legislation penal judicatory; 31.A1, and all pervading system of securities; A42, and securities for app. apt. of leg.; VII.7, p.m. and impartial election by leg.; VIII.1.A1, local field of service of p.m. coextensive with leg.; A2, p.m.'s logical field of service v. justice minister; A3, p.m.'s logical field of service defined; A4, applied to minister; A5–10, use of term 'prime minister' justified; A7, Spanish 'gefe politico' v. 'prime minister' ; A8–10, U.S. 'president' v. 'prime minister' ; 2.A1, fs. of p.m.: executive f.; A2, directive f.; A3–4, locative f.; A5–7, dislocative f. ; A8–15, imperative f., ex. by p.m. in relation to defensive force; A16, arrangements for redress by functionaries due to ex. Of fs.; 3.A1–2, communication between p.m. and leg. by message only, unless invited or ordered by leg. to appear personally; A3–4, fs. ex. by p.m. in sending messages to leg.: informative f.; A5, indicative; A6–7, initiative f.; A8, p.m. responsible for neglect of fs. ; A9, usual communication through minister rather than by message; A10, statistic f.; [4.A1–11, See SELF-SUPPLETIVE FUNCTION]; 5.A1, term of service of p.m.; A2, re-eligibility; A3, arrangements for election; A4, arrangements, if no election; 6.A1, remuneration of p.m. stated; A2, power of p.m. in relation to leg.; 7.A1, eligibility for location as p.m.; A2, monarchs or relations of monarchs excluded; A3, residency requirements; 8.A1, elected by leg.; A2, arrangements for elections; A2–4, secret and open voting employed; A5, reaching a majority; A6, secret and open voting discussed; 9.A1, p.m. dislocable by leg.; A2, and constitutive authority; A3, grounds for dislocation, same as for leg.; 10.Al&n-2, p.m. and use of manifold writing mode in registration system; A3–4, saving expense and security against falsification; A7, arrangements for preservation and periodic destruction of documents; 11.A15, p.m.'s report to leg. on need for secrecy; A16, committee of leg. to report, as check; A17, preventing unintentional disclosure; A18, new members in leg. and prevention of concealment; [12.A1–4, See SECURITIES] IX.2.A1, ministers serving under p.m. enumerated; A8, allotment of ministers to subdepts.; A9, no power without concurrence of leg. to separate subdepts. and to add additional ministers; 7.4th.A28, p.m. to secure from ministers, entries in loss books; 10.A11–12, information of all relevant occurrences furnished to leg. and p.m.; 15.A35, p.m. conferring factitious dignity could subvert constitution; 16.A3, location by single person, p.m.; A3, legal and moral responsibility for choice rests with p.m.; A18, p.m. and other ministers, judges in qualification judicatory; A42, under direction of p.m., advertisement for instructors; 17.A1, pecuniary competition process, p.m. to advertise for offers; A21, A31, p.m. as confirmative locator; A32, reasons to be given for substitution of another locable; 18.A4, every minister at all times dislocable by p.m.; 19.A16, p.m. to ex. consummative f. in location of subordinates; A18–19, securities in filling vacancies; A19, securities against dislocation by p.m.; 21.A18, p.m. may be special judge where minister is alleged oppressor; A19, provision for case where p.m. is oppressor; A38, p.m. and dislocation judicatory; A44, p.m. and simple dislocation of functionaries subordinate to ministers; A45, and promotion of functionaries; A46, and transfer of functionaries; 24.A5, p.m. and receipt of reports designed to prevent deterioration of Pannomion; 25.A1, p.m. as person to whom securities apply; A2, leg. to decide which securities applicable to p.m. are applicable to ministers; A3, relevant securities listed; pg 584A20, p.m. to receive exemplars of remuneration draft; A22, p.m. to receive non-payment complaint if failure to pay remuneration for extra despatch; 26.A17, ministers' offices arranged in crescent shape with p.m.'s office at centre. See CONSTITUTIVE AUTHORITY; LEGISLATURE; MINISTER(S); PUBLICATION SYSTEM; PUBLIC OPINION TRIBUNAL; REGISTRATION SYSTEM; SECURITIES
PRINCIPLE(S): (i) Greatest Happiness Principle: II.A1, A8–9, A11, A12, A14, V.4.A4, 5.A6, VI.31.A3, IX.17.A43, A47, 20.A11, 25.A43 (ii) Other: II.A2, official apt. max. principle, expense min. principle; A17, public examination principle, pecuniary competition principle, responsible location principle; VI.31.A2, confidence min. principle, control max. principle; VIII.11.A3, principles regarding publicity; IX.3.A34, self-judication principle in English practice; 7.4th.A24, individual responsibility principle; 15.A1, leading principles of code regarding remuneration: apt. max., expense min.; A29, factitious dignity contrary to principles of constitution; 16.A9, principles of location system; 17.A39, disappointment preventing principle; A42–59, pecuniary competition principle discussed; A45, competition principle; A53, frugality-maximizing principle; 19.A11, principles of official attendance; A15, principles of location system; 26.A15, juxtaposition principle; A15n, superposition principle. See HAPPINESS; RULE(S)
PROCEDURE: IX.16.A20, A21, mode of procedure of qualification judicatory; 20.A20, use of judicial procedure and min. of evil; 21.A20, arbitrary v. judicially grounded procedure; A24, enforceability of rules and importance of system of judicial procedure; A25, English system contrasted; A26, rules of negative-effective benevolence, not enforceable with advantage in states where procedure system aims at injustice; 25.A50–8, arbitrary administrative procedure and English practice, preference of military model. See EVIDENCE; PROCEDURE CODE
PROCEDURE CODE: V.5.A6, and amendments; VI.23.A31, and excuses for non-attendance at leg.; 27.A11, A15, A17, A19–20, IX.10.A8, and evidence elicitation; IX.4.A9, and rights; 10.A2, and mendacity licence; 20.A5, A22, and evidence-holders; 21.A20, A25, and judicial procedure; A54, and future communication securing arrangements; 23.A7, and questions addressed to ministers; 25.A17, and quasi-judicial assertion; A58, and judicial and military procedure
PROCURATION MANDATE: See PROCUREMENT MANDATE
PROCURATIVE FUNCTION: IX.4.A45, ex. by ministers collectively in regard to things; A45, defined; A45, procurative v. locative fs.; A46, fs. Corresponding to submodes of procurement: emptive, conductive, fabricative, requisitive, transreceptive, transmissive, retroacceptive, retrotransmissive; A47, preceded by ex. of requisitive f.; A53, retroacceptive and retrotransmissive fs., and mercede locative f.; 7.2nd.A24, uses of mimographical or receptacular mode of registration and ex. of procurative f.; 8.A28, modes of procurement, competing forms, examples given; 19.A32, government fabrication and use of permanent v. temporary functionaries, leg. to decide; A33, examples given; A34, fabricative f., custoditive f., and reparative f., permanent v. temporary employees; 23.A6–12, A14, prevention of peculation in ex. of procurative f. See PROCUREMENT MANDATE(S)
PROCUREMENT MANDATE(S): IX.4.A47, and procurative f.; 8.A1, defined pg 585and called procuration mandate; A2–3, issued by leg. alone, unless delegated to p.m. or ministers; A13, issued by requisitee when confirming requisition instrument; A15, transmitted to requisitor either directly or through finance minister; A22, where issued, exemplars to all intermediate offices. See PROCURATIVE FUNCTION; REQUISITIVE FUNCTION
PROFIT(S): (i) Sinister profit: V.6.A2, IX.10.A25, 17.A54, 23.A14–15, 25.A26–9 (ii) Oppression for profit is extortion: IX.21.A2, 22.A2 (iii) Profit from expense: VI.27.A48, IX.3.A23, 4.A70, 25.A58 (iv) Profit from wrongs or undue profit: IX.17.A41, 23.A l, A3 (v) Other: IX.17.A53, 21.A6. See INTEREST(S)
PROMOTION: VIII.2.A4, promotion, defined as location; A1 l, p.m. and promotion in army subdept.; A13, and navy subdept.; A14, authenticating instruments; A15, use of manifold writing system; A16, arrangements for redress; IX.4.A44, promotion is bis-submode of location; 18.A2, promotion as mode of modified dislocation; 19.A21, A28, promotion, not to be used in filling vacancies; 20.A25, stopping promotion and non-compliance of subordinate with direction of superordinate ; 21.A45, only minister, p.m., or leg. May stop promotion of functionary; A68, application of dislocation instrument to definitive stoppage of promotion, headings of entry; A69, temporary stoppage of promotion, headings of entry; A73, A76, arrangements for exemplars of record and instruments. See LOCATION AND DISLOCATION; SUBORDINATE(S) AND SUPERORDINATE(S); SUSPENSION; TRANSFER
PRUDENCE: VII.8, false honour and dignity at expense of self-regarding prudence; IX.21.A21, A26. self-regarding prudence v. extra-regarding prudence and rules of deportment; 25.A28, ordinary prudence and presumption of culpable deficiency of ministers. See DEPORTMENT
PUBLIC AND PRIVATE: VI.27.A29, public and private edifices used for legislation enquiries; 31.A16, public and private evil; VII.4, public and private occupations; IX.9.A4, A10, inspective f. and public and private business; IX.20.A10–13, public inspection of private institutions; 21.A1, private and public wrong; A32, private and political deontology; 26.A21, public and private waiting-boxes. See PECULATION; PUBLICATION SYSTEM; PUBLICATIVE FUNCTION; PUBLICITY AND SECRECY; PUBLIC OPINION TRIBUNAL
PUBLICATION SYSTEM: VI.31.A44, and securities for app. intellectual apt. in leg.; VIII.11.A1, publication system defined; A2, publicity max. in all depts. and offices; A3, exception for expense; A4, value of publicity discussed; A5, exception where publicity is an evil; A6–7, examples given; A8, time limit to secrecy; A9, no limits to publicity except expense and temporary evil; A10, no limits to good of publicity; A11, internal v. external publication; A12, manifold writing v. printing press; A13, importance of registration system to internal and external publication; A14, rules for limiting secrecy; A15, limitations on time of secrecy; A15, p.m. to make annual report to leg.; A16, legislative committees to report as check; A17, preventing unintentional disclosure; A18, new members in leg. and prevention of concealment; 12.A1, publication system and security for app. apt. of p.m.; IX.9.A3, ex. of inspective f. and publication system; 25.A3, as security for app. apt. of ministers; 26.A43, as security against loss of manuscripts in treasury. See PUBLICATIVE FUNCTION; PUBLICITY AND SECRECY; REGISTRATION SYSTEM
PUBLICATIVE FUNCTION: IX.4.A13, follows ex. of registrative f.; A58, ex. by ministers collectively in regard to persons, things, money, and occurrences; pg 586A58, defined. See PUBLICATION SYSTEM; PUBLICITY AND SECRECY; REGISTRATION SYSTEM; REGISTRATIVE FUNCTION
PUBLICITY AND SECRECY: VI.20.A5, publication of absences of legislators; 21.A1, sittings of leg. are public, and p.o. trib. reports to constitutive authority; A3, arrangements for secret sittings; A4–5, disclosure by subsequent legs.; 27.A29, A35, max. of publicity in enquiries; A36, and employment of judge as legislational elicitor; A37, secrecy and size of judicatory; A55, secrecy and monarch's commissions in English practice; 28.A l, trial by legislation penal judicatory where dislocation with publicity not considered sufficient punishment; A4, judges appointed by secret ballot; VI.31.A42, publicity and securities for app. apt. of legislators; V II.11, secrecy in legislative proceedings discussed; VIII.11.A2, publicity max. in all depts. and offices; A3, exception for expense; A4, value of publicity discussed; A5, exception where publicity is an evil; A6–7, examples given; A8, time limit to secrecy; A9, no limits to publicity except expense and temporary evil; A10, no limits to good of publicity; A14, rules for limiting secrecy; A15, limitation on time of secrecy; A15, p.m. to make annual report to leg.; A16, legislative committee to report as check; A17, preventing unintentional disclosure; A18, new members in leg. and prevention of concealment; 12.A1, publicity and secrecy and security for app. apt. of p.m.; A3, secrecy of identity of informant of misconduct and inaptitude of ministers; IX.9.A10, light of publicity difficult to shine on establishments under private management; 16.A3, publicity and provision for moral apt. in location system; A20, publicity max. in qualification judicatory for entry on locable list; 20.A12, secret institutions in representative democracy and tyranny; 21.A10, A20, and indirectly applying remedies against oppression; A16, and directly applying remedies against oppression; A70, publicity max. in proceedings for dislocation; A71, exceptions for secrecy as in time of war; 23.A13, recordation and publicity in receipt and disbursement of money; A16, publicity and avoidance of peculation; 25.A16, recordation and publicity in quasi-judicial assertion; A23, importance of publicity in administrative dept.; A24, leg. to make arrangements for secrecy in extra despatch where necessary, as in war; A32, provision for secrecy in proceedings relating to inaptitude of functionaries; 26.A4, architectural arrangements to serve purposes of publicity and secrecy; A4, publicity of greater utility than secrecy; A5, A6, subjects for consideration in choosing publicity or secrecy; A7, varying demands for publicity and secrecy as between depts., subdepts., and offices; A8, A9, greatest use and extent of secrecy required in constitutive dept, in secret ballot; A10, greatest publicity needed in judiciary dept.; A11, administrative dept, is intermediate between constitutive and judiciary depts.; A12, uses of publicity and secrecy and architectural arrangements; A22, use of waiting-boxes to augment publicity; A32–7, secret meetings between suitors and ministers, motives and reasons. See ARCHITECTURE; INSPECTIVE FUNCTION; PUBLICATIVE FUNCTION; REGISTRATION SYSTEM; REGISTRATIVE FUNCTION
PUBLIC MERIT REGISTER (or EXTRAORDINARY SERVICE REGISTER): IX.15.A22, for recordation of judicially recognized extraordinary public service; A23, entry to be concluded with opinative and imperative decrees; A24, suit for entry in register, how initiated; A25, suit may be initiated for another, with or without consent; 25.A5, official merit register, as instrument of security for app. apt.
PUBLIC OPINION TRIBUNAL: II.A20, moral sanction, p.o. trib. and response pg 587bility; A24, moral responsibility, p.o. trib. and English government; V.4.A1, p.o. trib., essential authority in constitution; A1, power basically judicial; A2, composition of p.o. trib.; A3, committees of p.o. trib., examples given; A4, p.o. trib., as a system of law v. English common law; A4, public opinion and greatest happiness principle; 5, fs. of p.o. trib.: A1, statistic f.; A2, censorial f.; A3, executive f.; A4, melioration suggestive f.; A5, moral v. legal obligation for functionaries and non-functionaries to ex. statistic f.; A6, the formulation of amendments to law, headings given; A7, amendments and the preservation of symmetry; A8, reasons to be given for proposing amendments; A9, p.o. trib. and securities for good conduct of judiciary dept.; 6.A1, all members of human species have right to ex. statistic, executive, and melioration-suggestive fs.; A2, and censorial f.; A2, defamation discussed; A3, prohibition or taxation of political tracts by leg. is anti-constitutional and breach of trust; A4, defamation and free circulation of political tracts; A5, suppression of truth hostile to greatest number; VI.20.A17, p.o. trib, softens the rigor of despotism in English practice; 21.A1, sittings of leg. are public, and p.o. trib. Reports to constitutive authority; A2, access of p.o. trib. to sittings max.; 23.A9, p.o. trib. and absentation from leg. and corruption; 25.A50, p.o. trib., moral apt. and liberty of press discussed; A53, p.o. trib. and temporary non-relocability v. undiscontinued relocability; 27.A37, p.o. trib. and securities against oppression where secrecy necessary in legislation enquiry judicatory; A38, p.o. trib. to max. efficiency of securities applicable to legislation enquiry judicatory; A49, power of p.o. trib. hatched under wings of House of Commons; A56, p.o. trib. and reports in English practice; 31.A32–3, p.o. trib. and security against abuse of power in pure monarchies; A35, in pure aristocracy; A37, power of p.o. trib. in mixed monarchies; A43, p.o. trib. and securities for app. moral apt. in leg.; VIIn, chief use of legislator's inaugural declaration to subject leg. to p.o. trib.; VIII.8.A6, influence of p.o. trib. and open voting; 11.A4, A8, p.o. trib. and the value of publicity ; 12.A1, p.o. trib. ex. statistic, censorial, and melioration-suggestive fs. as security for app. apt. of p.m.; IX.3.A15, p.o. trib. as substitute for control by many-seated functionaries; A24, A27, influence diminished with many-seated system as in England; A25, single-seatedness and p.o. trib.; 7.1st.A20, statistic f. provides matter for p.o. trib.; A20, censure by p.o. trib. where legal punishment not warranted; 4th.A10, p.o. trib. and detection of fraud; A29, to judge veracity of entries in loss books; 6th.A5, use of abbreviations and comprehension by p.o. trib.; A5, use of abbreviations to elude scrutiny of p.o. trib.; IX.10.A23, absence of information and control by p.o. trib. impossible; 15.A19, A34, natural honour rendered by p.o. trib. for extraordinary service; A34, p.o. trib. cannot be corrupt; 16.A3, p.m. morally restricted by p.o. trib. in choice of candidates in location system; 17.A32, p.o. trib. and p.m.'s substitution of locables; 17.Con.Inst.Al, p.o. trib. to urge adoption of system of instruction for location system; Al, resistance to be expected from ministers to protect interests; A2, fallacies to be employed by government to prevent introduction of instruction system; A3, patriotism and frugality to be used by government to exclude foreign instructors; A4–5, for public good, functionaries must quit situations where system is introduced, or acquire instruction; 19.A14, p.o. trib. and increased remuneration for longevity; A20, importance of filling vacancies and responsibility to p.o. trib.; A25, repetition of qualification examination and influence of p.o. trib.; A36, p.o. trib. and succession in corrupt governments; 20.A18, p.o. trib. and execution of moral sanctions for pg 588compliance of non-functionaries to rules of deportment; 21.A10, p.o. trib. and indirectly applying remedies against oppression; A37, p.o. trib., where present at judicatory, best security against abuse; 25.A1, p.o. trib. and ex. of moral sanction, as security for app. apt.; A3, ex. of statistic, censorial, and melioration-suggestive fs. by p.o. trib. as security for app. apt.; A12, inspectors as members of p.o. trib. and visitor's deportment rules; A29. role of p.o. trib. where minister's vigilance of culpable deficiency of subordinate is lacking; A30–1, power of p.o. trib. over public functionaries, as security; A49, and acting on basis of precedent; A54, importance of p.o. trib. in English practice in providing security against arbitrary procedures in administrative dept.; 26.A20n, Panopticon, inspection, and p.o. trib. See CONSTITUTIVE AUTHORITY; PUBLICITY AND SECRECY
PUNIFACTIVE (OR PUNITIVE) FUNCTION: V.2.A2, ex. by constitutive authority; 3.A7–10, how ex. by constitutive authority; VI.2.A2, ex. by electors when leg. passes anti-constitutional ordinance; A8, ex. by constitutive authority where breach of faith over contracts; IX.5.A4, punifactive or punitive f., ex. in scale of subordination; A5, superordinate must have power to ex. to certain extent. See CONSTITUTIVE AUTHORITY; GOVERNMENT ADVOCATE GENERAL; LEGISLATION PENAL JUDICATORY; REWARD AND PUNISHMENT
PUNISHMENT: See REWARD AND PUNISHMENT
PUNITION: See REWARD AND PUNISHMENT
PUNITIVE FUNCTION: See PUNIFACTIVE FUNCTION
QUALIFICATION JUDICATORY: See LOCATION AND DISLOCATION
QUASI-JUDICIAL: IX.25.A16, quasi-judicial assertion to establish extra-despatch for special remuneration; A17, defined
QUASI-JURYMEN: IX.16.A18, members of qualification judicatory for entry on locable list; A28–9, voting by quasi-jurymen, secret mode only; A29, as quasi-jurymen serve as instructors, each has interest in highest rank for his pupils; A73, and use of lot in selection. See LOCATION AND DISLOCATION
RATIOCINATIVE FUNCTION: IX.12.A3, included in melioration suggestive f.; A3, called reason-giving f.; A3, how ex.
REAL: See ENTITIES; EVIDENCE
RECEPTIVE FUNCTION: IX.23.A14, peculation v. embezzlement in ex. of receptive f.
REDUNDANCY: VI.27.A18, A44, non-redundancy, desirable characteristic of evidence. See EVIDENCE; MANDATES; WRITTEN INSTRUMENTS
REEDITIVE MODE: VI.29.A5–6, emendation in reeditive mode explained; IX.25.A1n, corrective v. reeditive modes. See DIRECTIVE MODE
REELECTION: See RELOCATION
REFORM (IMPROVEMENT): VI.24.A9, and continuation committee; 25.A4, and relocation; 27.A43, A53, and English practice; IX.25.A49, acting on precedent as bar to reform
REGISTRAR(S): IX.5.A43, an indispensable subordinate; 11.A3, reception and communication of information, performed by one man; 16.A38–41, results of votation process published by registrar
REGISTRATION SYSTEM: VI.27.A8, and examples of preappointed evidence: pg 58931.A44, and securities for app. intellectual apt. in leg.; VIII.10.A1&n, A2, p.m. and use of manifold mode in registration system; A3–4, saving expense and security against falsification; A5, use in judiciary authority; A6, as security against destruction of judicial documents; A7, arrangements for preservation and periodic destruction of documents; 11.A9, no limits to publicity except expense and need for secrecy and registration system; A13, importance of registration system to publication system; 12.A1, registration system as security for app. apt. of p.m.; IX.9.A3, ex. of inspective f. to secure working of registration system; 21.A21, registration and indirectly applying remedies against oppression; 23.A13, recordation and publicity in receipt and disbursement of money; A16, recordation and avoidance of peculation; 25.A3, as security for app. apt. of ministers; A16, recordation and publicity in quasi-judicial assertions; 26.A43, as security against loss of manuscripts in treasury. See MANIFOLD WRITING MODE; PUBLICATION SYSTEM; PUBLICITY AND SECRECY; REGISTRATIVE FUNCTION
REGISTRATIVE FUNCTION (RECORDATIVE FUNCTION): IX.4.A13, registrative f. composed of minutative, conservative fs. and, with exceptions, followed by publicative f. ; A57, ex. by ministers with regard to persons, things, money, and occurrences; A57, also named recordative f.; A57, defined; A57, and statistic f. See PUBLICATION SYSTEM; PUBLICATIVE FUNCTION; PUBLICITY AND SECRECY; REGISTRATION SYSTEM; STATISTIC FUNCTION
RELEVANT AND IRRELEVANT: IX.4.A16, occurrences subject to registrative f.; A16, defined; A17, subdepts. to max. number and value of relevant occurrences; A17, distinction especially applicable to ex. of statistic and registrative fs.; A19, and written instruments. See OCCURRENCES
RELIGION: IX.11.A11, no obligation to furnish information on religion
RELOCATION: IV.A2, relocation of leg. as reward by constitutive authority; VI.25.A1, no relocation of deputies unless number of former deputies reach certain number; A2, ascertained by legislation minister; A3, relocation procedure and continuation committee; A4, competition for office is essential for improvement; A5, essential for avoiding power without responsibility; A6, examples of elections without competition: joint proprietors of funds; A7, East India Company; A7, Bank of England; A8, City of London Common Council; A9, U.S. practice; A10, French practice; A11, English House of Commons; A12–13, two candidates required for effective choice; discontinued relocability, reasons given: (i) A14, evil prevented (ii) A15, continuity provided by continuation committee (iii) A16, no disappointment for legislators; (iv) A17, prevention of inaptitude; (v) A18, prevention of inaptitude by avoiding effective possession of office for life; (vi) A19–27, prevention of moral inaptitude and corruption; A28–9, rule of min. time of contact to deal with corruption; A30, application to judiciary; A31, rule not yet applied in any country; A32, utility of experience considered; A32, A34, A35, experience v. apt.; A33, app. apt. secured through continuation committee; A36, experience of electors considered; A37, why not perpetual non-relocability; A38–9, period of non-relocability discussed; A40–41, opportunities for temporarily dislocated deputies; A42–5, app. apt. and period of founding new states discussed; A46, undiscontinued relocability a greater risk than temporarily discontinued locability; A47, example of English rump parliament considered; A48, corruption excluded by continuity of executive; A49, other securities discussed; A50, moral apt., p.o. trib., and liberty of the press pg 590discussed; A50, U.S. practice; A51, English practice; A52, objections to temporary non-relocability system discussed: lack of freedom of choice, unmerited suffering by legislators, power too slight to attract candidates; A53, temporary non-relocability system with continuation compared with undiscontinued relocability: competition, experience and new men, watchmen outside leg., supply of experienced men for sublegs, and other government offices; A54–5, relevance of securities relating to attendance and remuneration discussed; 31.A42, relocation and securities for app. apt. of legislators; VIII.2.A16, p.m., not judicatory, to determine relocation after successful appeal against dislocation; 5. A2, re-eligibility of p.m. See LOCATION AND DISLOCATION
REMEDY(IES): IX.21.A9, remedies for oppression, oppressee a non-functionary; A9, generally-applying v. specially applying; A10, specially applying: directly applying v. indirectly applying; A11–1 9, directly applying remedies, cases given; A20, indirectly-applying remedies listed ;A34, remedies where oppressee a functionary ; A35, remedies for abuse of directive power; A36, remedies for abuse of dislocative power; A48, dislocation instrument as indirectly applying remedy; 22.A4, remedies for extortion; 23.A5, remedies for peculation; A10–11, limitations on remedies; 26.A34, punifactive, satisfactive, suppressive, and preventive remedies. See JUDICIARY AUTHORITY; OPPRESSION; PENAL CODE; REWARD AND PUNISHMENT
REMUNERATION: II.A16n, remuneration no basis for responsibility; IV.A14, self-suppletive f. and remuneration; VI.19.A1, remuneration of legislators stated; 20.A2, arrangements in assembly chamber for remuneration; A4, remuneration for days attended only ; A8, withholding remuneration for nonattendance as punishment; A10, remuneration by day discussed; 25.A54–5, effect of pecuniary punishment for non-attendance in leg. discussed in light of other securities; 31.A43, remuneration and securities for app. moral apt. of legislators; VII.4, official pay, waste, and corruption discussed; VIII.6.A1, remuneration of p.m. stated; IX.5.A22, superordinateness does not merit increase in pay; 9.A3, extra remuneration and ex. of inspective f.; 15.A1, leading principles of code regarding remuneration: apt. max., expense min.; A3, min. of expense, a means to max. of apt.; A3, the smaller the remuneration, the greater the relish for the office; A3, even greater, if individual pays for the office; A4, large remuneration leads to decrease in apt.; A5, min. of expense, both end and means; A6, rule for remuneration: competition by those possessing app. apt. for smallest remuneration; A7, liberality ex. by public functionaries is waste; A8–10, A45, arbitrary remuneration repugnant to constitution; A11, public service as basis of reward; A12, ordinary v. extraordinary service to public; A13, ordinary service defined; A14, extraordinary service defined; A15, pecuniary v. honorary reward; A16–17, both may be demanded from judicatory for extraordinary service; A18, reward for natural honour augmented only; A19, natural honour spontaneously renewed by p.o. trib. for extraordinary service; A20, A23, natural honour judicially augmented by opinative and imperative decrees; A21–2, recorded and published in public merit register; A24–7, suit for entry in public merit register; A28, publication as arranged by leg.; A29, factitious honour contrary to principles of constitution; A30, instruments for conferring factitious dignity: titles of honour and ensigns of dignity; A31–3, examples given; A34, factitious dignity unsuitable, even if judicially conferred; A35, arbitrary conferring of factitious dignity, sufficient to destroy constitution; A36, ultra-concomitant remuneration repugnant to constitution; A36, defined; A37, all ultra pg 591remuneration unjustifiable; A38, modes of ultra-concomitant remuneration, examples given; A39, artificially mislocated remuneration, repugnant to constitution; A40, defined; A41–3, mislocated in toto v. extravasated, defined and distinguished; A44, naturally extravasated remuneration distinguished; A45, reward mislocated in toto, examples given; A45, excluded from code; A46, reward artificially extravasated, examples given; A47, especially repugnant when combined with factitious dignity; A48, exemplified in hereditary titles of honour; A49, extraordinary service analogous to ordinary service, remuneration given; A50, defined; A51, examples given; A53, judicially conferred; A52, judge to guard against fraud; A54, minister's pay stated; A54, standard for pecuniary competition; A55, all ministers' remuneration the same; A56, pay not increased if minister allotted to more than one subdept.; A57, indemnification of expenses for inspection visits; 16.A48, remuneration of instructors, and motives for exertion; A49–50, extra-remuneration, when necessary, examples; A49, and other motives for exertion; A51–2, leg. To regulate extra-remuneration of instructors: not to be larger than that received for subsistence by lowest-paid class of labourers; A53, no allowance for lodging and diet of pupils; A54, disgust of opulent at sight of indigent, grounds for clothing allowance; 19.A12, no increase in remuneration for continuance in office, reasons given; A13, nor for length of service in official establishment; A14, nor for longevity, reasons given; A29, A30, A31, emolument, power and grade, correspondence in military v. non-military service; A31, max. of reward can lead to max. of corruption; A35–8, augmentation of remuneration in corrupt v. ordinarily meritorious service; A39, extramerit, only basis of extra-remuneration; 25.A13–25. remuneration for extradespatch. See ARBITRARINESS; DESPATCH; LOCATION AND DISLOCATION; REWARD AND PUNISHMENT
REMUNERATION DRAFT: See DESPATCH
REPARATIVE FUNCTION: IX.4.A50, ex. by ministers collectively in regard to things; A50, defined; 19.A34, ex. of reparative f. by permanent v. temporary functionaries; 23.A14, peculation and ex. of reparative f.
REPRESENTATIVE: See DEPUTY
REPRESENTATIVE DEMOCRACY: VI.25.A46, subversion of by undiscontinued relocability; 31.A25–6, most favourable to use of securities for app. apt.; VIII.5.A4, representative democracy changed to monarchy and aristocracy where leg. fails to elect p.m.; 11.A6, democracy changed to aristocracy by publicity given to secret voting; IX.5.A15, necessary distinctions in foreign relations grades in representative democracy; 20.A12, and secret institutions; 25.A48, power-holding class in representative democracy v. aristocracy-ridden monarchy; 26.A40, representative democracy v. monarchy in expense in moving from place to place; A46–7, even a republic requires military guard to protect buildings and contents from popular commotion
REPUTATION: II.A16n, as reward; V.6.A2, and defamation; VI.25.A20, and matter of corruption; VII.9, and impartiality of legislators; IX.16.A3, of p.m. and improper choice in location; 17.A49, factor in the engagement of personal service; A51, reputation and opportunities for timid merit; 21.A40, dislocation judicatory and opportunity to clear reputation. See CORRUPTION; LOCATION AND DISLOCATION; REWARD AND PUNISHMENT
REQUISITIVE FUNCTION: IX.4.A47, precedes ex. of procurative f.; 8.A1, procurement mandate, necessary to ex. of f.; A2–3, leg. to issue or delegate to p.m. or ministers power to issue; A4, when requisitive f. ex. without pg 592authority, expense is equivalent to imposition of a tax; A5, requisitive f., preparatory to ex. of procurative f.; A6, requisitive f. ex. where no procurement mandate in force; A7, defined; A7, ex. by application to leg. or delegated functionary; A8, application made by requisition instrument; A8, requisitor v. requisitee; A9, requisition instrument necessary for valid procurement mandate; A9, requisition instrument is to the procuration mandate as, in law, the initiative is to the consummative; A10, requisition v. petition; A11, offices where requisition instruments are issued; A11, need indicated by mimographical documents; A12, requisition instrument—examples of headings of entries; A13, requisitee, when confirming requisition, issues procuration mandate; A14, checks on requisition in mimographical documents and other data; A15, procurement mandate transmitted to requisitor immediately or through finance minister; A16, ministers required to transmit 'appropriate and timely' requisition instruments to p.m. to meet needs of depts.; A17, ordinary v. extraordinary service; A18, arrangements at outset of code for supply; A19, renewal of supply; A19, solar v. service year; A19, general supply day; A20, spontaneous mandate v. requisition instrument; A21, spontaneous procurement: diverse forms distinguished; A22, use of exemplars; A23, use of statistic and registration system to determine supply; A23, leg. to distinguish between ordinary and extraordinary service; A23, and determine from and to what offices requisition instruments may be transmitted; A24–5, latitude of subordinates min.; A26, self-supply when possible, examples; A27–8, modes of procurement, competing forms, examples given; A29, effect of failure to choose cheapest form: a tax; A30, emphasis on clearness, conciseness, uniformity, legibility, cheapness; A31, clearness defined; A32, conciseness defined; A33, use of abbreviations; A34, rules for uniformity of expression; A35, uniformity of paper used, especially in manifold writing; A36, manifold writing v. printing for cheapness and legibility; A37, writing v. stamping; A38, application to sublegs.; 19.A6, leg. to determine which grades to ex. requisitive f. See LEGISLATURE; PROCUREMENT MANDATE; STATISTIC FUNCTION
RESIGNATION: VI.30.A1, as cause of dislocation of members of leg.; IX.21, A51, resignation for deficiencies of app. apt.; A51, where deficiency in moral apt. resignation not acceptable; A52, causes of resignation other than deficiencies in app. apt. listed. See LOCATION AND DISLOCATION
RESPONSIBILITY: II.A16, max. responsibility of those possessing subordinate power to those possessing sovereign power; A16&n, responsibility established by expectation of evil and punishment, but not by good and reward; A16n, word 'responsibility' discussed; A20, responsibility in its effects: punitional, satis factional, and dislocational; produced by legal and moral sanctions; A21, compensational v. punitional responsibility; A22, legal responsibility discussed; A23, pecuniary responsibility discussed; A24, moral responsibility discussed; IV.A14, self-suppletive f. and responsibility of functionaries; VI.1.A13, responsibility and changes in constitution by leg.; 23.A2, responsibility of deputy for substitute (self-suppletive f.); A26, moral and pecuniary responsibility of deputy for substitute; 25.A49, moral and legal responsibility of deputies and electors; 26, A4, members of leg. involved in wrongful exclusion of others are compensationally, punitionally, and dislocationally responsible; 31.A42, responsibility and securities for app. apt. of legislators; VIII.3.A8–9, responsibility of p.m. for ex. of fs.; 4.A5–6, responsibility of p.m. for depute: punishment, compensation, dislocation; 5.A4, responsibility of leg. pg 593for failing to hold elections of p.m.; 12.A1, responsibility of p.m. to ex. initiative, indicative, informative fs. as security for app. apt.; A1, responsibility of p.m. for his deputes and subordinates, as security for app. apt.; A1, responsibility of p.m., punitionally and compensationally, as security for app. apt.; A2–3, responsibility of informant of misconduct or inaptitude of minister; A4, p.m. responsible for ministers appointed by predecessors; IX.5.A21, subordinateness, accountableness, and responsibility; 7.4th.A21, one person responsible for loss of any article; A22, also responsible for losses of assistants and deputes; A23, responsibility of inspectors v. custodients; A24, individual responsibility: rule and principle; 15.A4, opulence does not increase responsibility; 16.A35, responsibility for false statements in qualification judicatory; 17.A37, responsibility for mislocation, compensational and punitional; 21.A17, judge's ex. of imperative f. and undivided responsibility; 25.A3, responsibility of ministers to ex. informative, indicative, and initiative fs., as security for app. apt.; A3, responsibility for apt. of depute, as security; A3, A26–7, responsibility for apt. of immediate subordinates, as security. See LOCATION AND DISLOCATION; REWARD AND PUNISHMENT; SECURITIES
RESPONSIVE FUNCTION: IX.24.A1, ex. by ministers in leg.; A3, ministers bound to attend sessions of leg. to answer questions
RETROACCEPTIVE FUNCTION: See PROCURATIVE FUNCTION
RETROTRANSMISSIVE FUNCTION: See PROCURATIVE FUNCTION
REVOLT: IX.19.A30, and need for correspondence of grade, power, and emolument in military service. See COMMOTION; MILITARY SERVICE; REVOLUTION
REVOLUTION: VI.25.A46, undiscontinued relocability and violent revolution. See COMMOTION; REVOLT
REWARD AND PUNISHMENT: II.A3, punishment and reward included in matter of expenditure; A4, punishment defined; A6, reward defined; A8, evil employed as means, as punishment; A9, as an instrument of coercion; A10, pleasure as means in matter of reward; A11, good employed in reward as instrument of inducement; A12, smaller proportion of reward than punishment employed in government; A16, punishment, reward, and responsibility; A16n, fear of punishment and not reward will create responsibility; A20, punitional responsibility; A21, compensational preferred to punitional responsibility; A22, dislocation and punishment and legal responsibility ; A23, compensational responsibility and punition; IV.A2, relocation and dislocation as reward and punishment of legislators by constitutive authority; A3, leg. to punish chiefs of administrative and judiciary depts. for non-compliance; V.5.A3, punishment and ex. of executive f. by p.o. trib.; A5, reward for ex. of statistic f.; A5, natural v. factitious reward; VI.20.A8, corporal and capital punishment discussed and rejected; A8, withholding remuneration for non-attendance as punishment; A9, punishment of common soldier v. high government officials; 23.A9, absentation, corruption, and the avoidance of punishment; A32, punishment and insufficient excuse for non-attendance; 25.A54–5, effect of security of pecuniary punishment on members of leg. discussed; 27.A50, punishment by House of Commons v. judiciary in eliciting evidence; A51, punishment for perjury in House of Lords v. House of Commons; A55, punishment and commissions in English practice; 28.A l, trial by legislation penal judicatory where punishment by dislocation not sufficient; A8, punishment and impartiality by legislation penal judicatory; A14, pg 594punishment by leg. of wrongful accusers; 31.A17–18, attitude to punishment by rulers in relation to ruled; A19–21, attitude of rulers to themselves; A41n, punishment and English judicial practice; VIIn, legislator's inautural declaration applicable where punishment not effective; 2, reward and punishment and min. of expense in government; 4, no punishment by legislators over difference of taste, opinion, or belief; VIII.4.A5–6, punishment and responsibility of principal for depute; 5.A4, punishment and responsibility of leg. For failing to hold election of p.m.; 12.A1, punishment by legislation penal judicatory as security for app. apt. of p.m.; IX.5.A4, power of punition, necessary to subordination; A22, power being part of reward, higher rank requires no increase in pay; 7.6th.A6, punishment for negligence or intentional misconduct in ex. of statistic f.; 15.A4, 17.A56, opulence and voidance of punishment; A9–10, arbitrary reward rejected; A11, public service as basis of reward; A15–17, pecuniary v. honorary reward; A18–28, natural honour and reward; A29–33, factitious dignity; A34, natural v. factitious reward; 16.A29n, corporal punishment and Hazelwood School; A75, use of lot in punishment; 17.A37, responsibility for mislocation and punishment; 19.A29, power, grade, and emolument, military v. non-military situations; A31, max. of reward can lead to max. of corruption; 20.A11, punishment as subtraction of reward; 21.A33, reward and punishment in absence of adequate penal code; A67, temporary transference to inferior grade as punishment; 23.A11, punishment and peculation; 25.A30, punishment and powers of p.o. trib.; A37, conditions for exemption from punishment where functionary ex. extraordinary powers; 26.A8, reward and punishment and secret suffrage; A33–7, reward for informers dicussed; A52, punishment and the absence of functionaries to deal with offenders. See DIGNITY AND FACTITIOUS DIGNITY; HONOUR, NATURAL AND FACTITIOUS; REMUNERATION; RESPONSIBILITY
RICH AND POOR: See FEW AND MANY; OPULENCE AND INDIGENCE
RIGHT(S): V.6.A1, all members of human species have right to ex. statistic, executive, melioration suggestive fs.; A2, and censorial f.; VI.24.A3, continuation committeeman has right of argumentation and initiation; A14, A17, A18, and right of voting; 25.A33, right of speech and motion but not right to vote in continuation committee; 29.A7, right of members of leg. to propose motions; IX.4.A7, rights——fictitious entities; A7–9, rights v. obligations; A9, natural rights v. sanctional rights; A9n, moral rights and confusion; A9n, moral rights v. legal rights; 5.A18, powers or rights of superordinates and obligations of subordinates; 17.A37, where mislocation no right to office; 20.A19, right of being inspecting visitor; 21.A4, abuse of power, non-exercise of and right; A12, right of appeal in cases regarding oppression
RIGHT AND WRONG: VI.28.A11, A13, A16, leg. as appellate judicatory and unredressed wrongs; VII.2, right and proper end of government; IX.16.A3, morally, but not legally binding right produced by location system; A3, favour v. right; 17.A59, right and wrong and judges; 21.A1, human nature and suffering wrong; A2, insubordination v. corruption v. extortion as wrongs to public service; 23.A12, right and wrong and abuse of power; 25.A1, right and proper use of powers
ROMAN LAW: IX.4.A10, source of distinction between immovables and movables
RULE(S): II.Al, all comprehensive and all-directing rule: max. happiness; A2, rules: max. app. official apt., min. official expense; A16, rules for max. app. pg 595apt. listed; VI.25.A28, rule to avoid corruptive influence: min. time of contact; 27.A44–8, rules for eliciting evidence and English practice; 31.A3, rule to limit power of functionaries; A4, rule to obtain efficient security for app. apt.; A5, rule to obtain security against abuse of power; VIII.11.A3, rules regarding publicity; A14, rules for limiting secrecy; IX.3.A26, rule for establishing single seated offices; A31, expense min. rule; 5.A48, rule for establishing no intermediate grade between operating functionary and minister; 7.4th.A24, individual responsibility rule; 8.A34, rules for uniformity of expression; 15.A6, rule for remuneration; 19.A11, rules for official attendance of functionaries; 20.A16, rules for deportment of non-functionaries before functionaries; A17, styled rules of good behaviour, good manners, good breeding, or decorum; A18–20, discussed; 21.A5, rules of official deportment and oppression of suitors; A6, and inspectees; A20, rules of deportment for functionaries as remedies for oppression; A21, A22, A29, rules of deportment analysed as rules of ethics; A23, enforceability of rules; A24, and importance of system of judicial procedure; A26, rules of self-regarding prudence, positive effective benevolence, negative effective benevolence; A55–6, rules for suspension; 23.A13, rules for receipt and disbursement of money; 25.A10–12, rules of deportment as instrument of security; 26.A15, rule for placing offices in contiguity. See PRINCIPLE(S)
RUSSIA: II.A24, England v. Russia; IX.19.A31, Russian code of Catherine the Second
SANCTION(S): II.A20, moral and legal sanctions, source of responsibility; VIIn, moral sanction and legislator's inaugural declaration; VIIn, legal sanction and legislator's inaugural declaration; VIIn, penalty of moral sanction, loss of popularity; IX.20.A18, rules of deportment and moral or popular sanction; A19, A20, and legal sanction; 21.A22, sanctions of penal code and rules of ethics; A26, moral or popular sanction, only sanction in corrupt society; 25.A l, sanctions and security for app. apt.; A54, moral sanction of p.o. trib. See MORAL
SCOTLAND: I.A6(inst.diss.), and size of territorial divisions; V.2.A3n, sheriff depute in Scottish law
SEATS (SEATEDNESS): See SINGLE AND MANY SEATED
SECURITIES: II.A19, securities and max. of app. apt.; A24, moral responsibility as imperfect, but important, security against misconduct; V.2.A3n, in English practice, 'representative' fictitious and fallacious security for the people against monarch; 5.A9, p.o. trib. and securities provided by judiciary dept.; VI.1.A1, power of supreme leg. is unlimited but checked by securities; A13, securities, responsibility, and changes in constitution; 20.A7, securities for non-attendance; 23.A13, deputy's substitute as security against accidental decision by leg.; 25.A48, continuity of p.m., as security in temporarily discontinued relocability system; A49, other securities discussed; A53, securities and temporary non-relocability v. undiscontinued relocability; A54–5, effect of pecuniary punishment for non-attendance in leg. discussed in light of other securities; 27.A19–21, securities against deception by falsehood; A37, securities against oppression where secrecy necessary in legislation enquiry judicatory; A38, securities applicable to legislation enquiry judicatory same as for leg.; A50, absence of securities against mendacity in ex. of evidence elicitation f. by House of Commons; 31. A1, all-pervading system of securities pg 596described; A1, security against abuse of power is one branch of security for app. moral apt.; A2, confidence min. principle, control max. principle; A3–5, corresponding rules stated; A6, basic assumptions about propensities of all human minds; A7, self-regard and sympathy present in all human minds; A8, self-regard prevalent over sympathy; A9, example given; A10, task of leg. And moralists to increase the influence of sympathy, but to assume its slight influence; A11, unless prevented, men will do evil to serve their private interests; A12, exceptions considered; A13, limitations on power not harmful to public service; A14–15, nor to individuals; A16, precautions necessary to prevent evil; A17–18, recognized by rulers in relation to the ruled; A19–21, but not in relation to themselves; A22, abuse of power in rulers, examples given; A23, propensity to evil and need for securities; A24, reception of securities, test of app. apt.; A25, different reception in different governments; A26, most favourable reception in representative democracy; A27, except by lawyer class; A28–30, examples given; A31–3, reception to securities in pure monarchy; A34–5, reception to securities in pure aristocracy; A36–41&n, reception to securities in mixed monarchy; A42, securities for all branches of app. apt. of members of leg. listed; A43, for moral apt. listed; A44, for intellectual apt. listed; A45, for active apt. listed; VII.2, max. of security as a positive end of government; 6, tax on judicial services as security-denying act; VIII.10.A4, manifold writing mode and security against falsification; A6, and security against destruction of judicial documents; 11.A4, publicity as security for app. apt.; 12.A1, securities for app. apt. of p.m. listed: (i) registration system; (ii) publication system; (iii) dislocation by leg.; (iv) dislocation by constitutive authority; (v) responsibility for ex. of informative, indicative and initiative fs.; (vi) dislocation upon accepting other office in the state; (vii) dislocation upon accepting office, gift, factitious honour, or dignity from foreign government or foreign person; (viii) obligation to keep depute; (ix) responsibility for apt. of subordinates; (x) securities applying to subordinates; (xi) checks to arbitrary location of subordinates; (xii) ex. of statistic, censorial, melioration-suggestive fs. by p.o. trib.; (xiii) dislocation, with punitional and compensational responsibility, before legislation penal judicatory; A2, p.m. to act on information of misconduct or inaptitude of ministers; A3, secrecy of informant's identity considered; A4, p.m. responsible for ministers appointed by predecessors; A5, additional securities listed; IX.7.6th.A6, securities in entries in ex. of statistic f.; 11.A6–7, leg. to establish securities against abuse in elicitation of information by subordinate functionaries; 13.A3, securities for app. apt., minister v. member of leg.; 16.A9, no one is locable without instruction, so long as any one with app. apt. is available, as security for app. apt.; 17.A6, pecuniary security for positions of simple trust and talent and trust; A14, self-seated v. extra-seated property, as pecuniary security; A15, and inalienability of security by possessor; A53, pecuniary competition system as security for app. apt.; A53, equality must be subordinate to security, or society cannot subsist; A54, securities for app. apt. more efficient in code than in any existing government; A58, systems of securities will prevent depredation; 18.A6, security against undue dislocation of ministers; 19.A10, subordinates appointed for life as security against arbitrary dislocation; A18–19, securities in filling vacancies; A20, why security for despatch in filling vacancies; 20.A2, securities for functionaries and nonfunctionaries against insubordination, oppression, extortion, peculation; A24, leg. to determine which grades to have securities against disturbance and pg 597non-compliance by suitors, inspectors, and evidence-holders; 21.A16, securities for app. apt. of special judges; A20, securities for clearness, correctness, relative completeness in evidence as indirectly applying remedy against oppression; A37, p.o. trib. of metropolis as best security against abuse of dislocative power; A40, security against oppression and decrees of dislocation judicatory; 23.A5, A9, securities against peculation; A23, security to be provided by those involved in receipt and disbursement of money; 25.A1, analytic sketch of subject-matter of securities, heads: (i) elements of app. apt.; (ii) motives; (iii) sanctions; (iv) persons to whom applied; (v) persons by whom applied; (vi) purposes; (vii) time factor; A2, leg. to decide which securities applicable to p.m. and leg. are applicable to ministers; A3, relevant securities listed: (i) registration system; (ii) publication system; (iii) dislocability by leg.; (iv) dislocability by constitutive authority; (v) responsibility for ex. of informative, indicative, and initiative fs.; (vi) dislocability for acceptance of other office; (vii) dislocability for acceptance of gift, office, factitious honour from foreign government; (viii) obligation to have deputes and responsibility for their apt.; (ix) responsibility for apt. of immediate subordinates; (x) securities in location system, especially in qualification judicatory; (xi) pecuniary competition system; (xii) authority of p.o. trib. in ex. of statistic, censorial, and melioration-suggestive fs.; instruments of security: (i) A4, character index; (ii) A5, official merit register; (iii) A6, official demerit register; A7, headings of entry; A8, convicted lists inserted in office calendar; A9, arrangements for new series when list becomes too great; (iv) A10, deportment rules displayed in every functionary's audience chamber; A11, inclusion of information from character index in functionary's deportment rules; A12, visitor's deportment rules for suitors and inspectors; A13, gift or remuneration for extra-despatch is corruption; A14, inhibition of remuneration for extradespatch acts as security against extortion and factitious delay; A15, exceptions, in case of urgency, minister to apply to finance minister by remuneration draught; A16, extra-despatch to be established by quasi-judicial assertion; A17, quasi-judicial assertion defined; A18, extra-despatch book, headings of entries; A19, entry from extra-despatch book to be included in remuneration draught; A20, exemplars of remuneration draught, how distributed; A21, signature of finance minister to acknowledge receipt of remuneration draught; A22, if no payment by certain date, finance minister to issue non-payment excuse and benemeritant may transmit to p.m. a non-payment complaint; A23, importance of publicity and access to register books emphasized; A24, leg. to arrange for secrecy for extra-despatch, where necessary, as in time of war; A25, provisions for extra-despatch do not apply to all extra-service; A26–7, responsibility of ministers for subordinates defined; A28, presumption of culpable deficiency with respect to minister's vigilance, examples given; A29, role of p.o. trib. where minister's vigilance is deficient; A30–1, power of p.o. trib. over functionaries, as security; A32, minister's ex. of dislocative or directive power on information of inaptitude of subordinates; A33, leg. to look for and exclude irresponsible ex. of power of functionaries and to establish necessary powers to diminish demand for expansion of power based on necessity; A34, examples given; A35, leg. not to confer power on ministers for emergencies; A36, functionary's ex. of extraordinary power, need to estimate evils; A37, ex. of extraordinary power and conditions for exemption from punishment; A38, abuse of power in mixed monarchy in ex. of extraordinary power; A39, dispensing power as abuse of power; A40, pg 598places executive authority wrongly above legislative authority; A41, in English practice; A42, dispensing power and other abuses; A42, judge-made law v. leg.-made law; A43, evils of following precedents; A44, blindness from one generation to another; A45, lowest apt. required; A46–7, and class of persons to whom system of following precedents is well adapted; A48, representative democracy v. aristocracy-ridden monarchy and power-holding classes; A49, acting on precedent is anti-rational and anti-constitutional; A50, use of judicial procedure in non-military subdepts. denied in English practice; A51, English practice combines arbitrary dislocability with virtual undislocability; A52, King's Bench is ineffectual; A53, law and jury system fail to provide remedies; A54, importance of p.o. trib. in English practice in providing securities against oppression in administrative depts.; A55–6, purchase of justice in English practice; A57, no security against oppression in English practice; A58, military procedures superior in English practice; 26.A42–7, arrangements for security of buildings and contents against loss. See APTITUDE; ARCHITECTURE
SELF-REGARD AND EXTRA-REGARD (OR SYMPATHY): VI.31.A7, selfregard and sympathy present in all human minds; A8, sympathy has root in self-regard; A8, self-regard prevalent over sympathy; A9, example given; A10, task of legislator to increase the influence of sympathy but to assume its slight influence; A16, evil doing by the preference of self-regard over sympathy; VII.9, impartiality v. self-regarding interest and interests inspired by sympathy and antipathy; IX.3.A9, self-regarding interests and sympathy and community of sinister interests; 15.A44, self-re gar ding or sympathetic interests and naturally extravasated remuneration; 19.A10, self-regarding interest and dislocative power; A14, mis-directed sympathy and remuneration for longevity; A14, and self-regard and benevolence; 26.A34, self-regarding or sympathetic interest and secret information. See INTEREST(S)
SELF-SUPPLETIVE FUNCTION: IV.A14, and provision of auxiliaries for functionaries; VI.20.A7, as security against non-attendance of legislators; A25, as remedy for retardation of public business; 23.A1, every deputy to ex. selfsuppletive f.; A2, deputy responsible for substitute; A3, eligibility for location as substitute; A4–6, arrangements for appointment and admission of substitute to assembly chamber; A5, permanent v. occasional substitute; reasons for provision of substitute given: (i) A7, same use as deputy; (ii) A8, secures continuous attendance; (iii) A9, prevention of corruption by absence during votes; (iv) A10, prevention of fluctuation of voting from number in attendance; (v) A11, saving time in soliciting attendance; (vi) A12, will actually expressed to equal will intended to be expressed in leg.; (vii) A13, security against accident in decisions of leg.; reasons for powers of appointment in deputy as opposed to constituents given: (i) A14, adequacy of supply better ensured; (ii) A15, apt persons in metropolis of the state; (iii) A16, substitute within call of deputy; (iv) A17, constancy of supply; (v) A18, danger of non-attendance during election when vacancy; (vi) A19, vexation and expense of elections; (vii) A20, absence of supply of substitutes during period of elections; (viii) A21, vexation and expense of elections for substitutes at the end of session ; (ix) A22, public expense of elections and salary saved if deputy appoints substitute; (x) A23, person with app. apt. but not able to become deputy could serve as substitute; (xi) A24, the opulent with app. apt., but otherwise indolent, could serve as deputy's substitute; (xii) A25, opportunity for new men with promise and app. apt. but who would pg 599not be willing or likely to be chosen by electors; (xiii) A26, patronage without corruption; A27, option left to deputy as to whether deputy or substitute will attend; A28, distinctive dress of substitutes discussed; 25.A53n, origin of Bentham's ideas; 31.A42, A45, and securities for app. apt. of legislators; VIII.4.A1, location of depute by p.m. in ex. of self-suppletive f. ; A2, depute defined and fs. stated; A3, occasions for assuming power listed; A4, power of principal and depute; A5–6, responsibility of principal for depute; A7, arrangements for location of depute; A8, instrument of location; A9, power passing between principal and depute; A9–10, arrangements for death of principal; A11, dislocability of depute; 12.A1, obligation of p.m. to ex. selfsuppletive f. as security for app. apt.; IX.3.A14, and avoidance of vacancies without expense; 4.A44, f. ex. in regard to persons; A44, defined; A44, and procurative f.; 6.A1, power of self-supply and obligation to ex. it belongs to every minister; A l, ex. by location of depute; A2, arrangements for united subdepts.; A3, time allowed for location; A4, instrument of location; A5, exemplars, where sent; A6, arrangements for emergencies; A7, when depute is needed; A8, eligibility for location as depute; A9, depute dislocable at any time either by minister or authorities locating minister; A10, f. also ex. by subordinates to ministers; A11, exceptions noted; A12, benefits of widespread use in administrative dept, of deputes: sufficient staff and frugality secured; A13, reasons given for sufficient number of deputes being available; A13, principal is to depute as master is to apprentice; 19.A5, leg. to determine which grades need to have power to ex. self-suppletive f.; 25.A26, and responsibility of ministers for subordinates
SENIORITY: IX.19.A35, official v. natural age; A35, use of official age as opposed to natural age as basis of succession in corrupt governments suggested; A36, succession by seniority and corruption; A37, in ordinary service, no need for increased emolument based on age. See LONGEVITY; SUBORDINATE AND SUPERORDINATE
SERVICE: VII.3, service v. factitious honour and dignity; IX.7.3rd.A13, estimating value of service of functionaries; 15.A11, service to public, basis of reward; A12–14, ordinary v. extraordinary service defined and distinguished; A19, extraordinary service and natural honour; A49, for extraordinary service analogous to ordinary service, remuneration given; A50, defined; A51, examples given; A53, judicially conferred; A52, judges to guard against fraud; 17.A54, service to public, result of competition system. See REMUNERATION; REWARD AND PUNISHMENT
SHORTAGES OF FOOD (DEARTH): See CALAMITY
SILENCE: VI.27.A16, silence and self-condemning evidence; IX.23.A7, and inference of peculation; 25.A30, silence of functionaries before interrogation of p.o. trib.
SINCERITY AND INSINCERITY: VI.1.A10–11, insincerity as evil in relations between deputy and constituents; VIIn, insincerity as moral disease; 1.A3, provision for sincerity in legislator's inaugural declaration; 13, sincerity in formulating ordinances and debate; VIII.12.A3, insincerity and secrecy of identity of informant. See FALLACIES
SINGLE AND MANY SEATED: IV.A12, leg. and sublegs, many seated; A13, administrative and judicial depts., single seated; VI.27.A37, secrecy and size of legislation enquiry judicatory; A55, single and many seated commissions in English practice; IX.3.A1, one minister only in each office; A2, singleseated offices v. plurality, reasons given; A3, single-seated offices and moral pg 600apt.; A4, and intellectual apt.; A5, and active apt.; A6, and min. of evil; A7, evil of many seatedness increases with number of seats; A8, many seatedness and larger community of sinister interest; A9, elements of community of sinister interest; A10, the higher in scale of power, the greater the delinquency; A11–13, A22–36, English practice compared; A14, self-suppletion deals with problem of vacancy; A15, code has other means to achieve benefits of many seatedness; A16–17, U.S. practice compared; A18, limitations on power of location and dislocation; A19, many-seatedness provides opportunity for appeal to superordinate; A20, arbitrary power and absence of control; A21, single v. many seatedness, leg. v. administration
SISTITIVE FUNCTION: IX.5.A4, power of, useful to subordination; 24.A5, judge's sistitive, or execution-staying f., and minister securing Pannomion from deterioration; A8, leg. to determine which administrative functionaries to ex. sistitive f.; A9, evil to be min. which may occur either with or without the ex. of this f.
SOVEREIGNTY: II.A16, sovereign power given to those whose interest it is to max. happiness; III.A1, sovereignty in people ex. by constitutive authority; VI.31.A42, sovereignty and security for app. apt. in leg. See CONSTITUTIVE AUTHORITY
SPAIN: I.A6(inst.diss.), 'alcalde' and fs. of local headman; II.A24, England v. Spain; VI.27.A49, Spanish Inquisition and English judiciary; VIII.1.A7, use of 'gefe politico' v. 'prime minister' ; IX.26.A20n, and Panopticon plan
STATE: I.A1, state named; Al, constitution adopted; A2, territory and boundaries delineated; A3, territory divided into districts, which serve as election districts; A4, division into subdistricts; A5, division into bis-subdistricts; A6, leg. to alter arrangements in manner commensurate with original plan; (inst.diss.), method of division discussed; (inst.diss.), tris-subdistricts, greatest division envisaged; (inst.diss.), in small states, one division only, or even none; (inst.diss.), terminology discussed; (inst.diss.), size of territorial divisions discussed; (inst.diss.), expense and number of divisions in territory discussed; IV.A1, state has four authorities: constitutive, legislative, administrative, judiciary; VII.8, relations between states discussed; VIII.7.A3, residency requirement for eligibility for location as p.m. See CONSTITUTIVE AUTHORITY; DISTRICT(S); LEGISLATURE; SUBDISTRICT(S)
STATE(S) AND MOTION(S): IX.4.A13, names of occurrences which are subject of registrative f. See OCCURRENCES
STATISTIC FUNCTION: (i) In general: V.5.A1, ex. by p.o. trib.; A5, moral v. legal obligation for functionaries to ex. statistic f.; 6.A1, all members of human species have right to ex. statistic f.; VI.31.A44, statistic f. and securities for app. intellectual apt. in leg.; VIII.3.A10, ex. by p.m. in annual message to leg.; 10.A7, use of exemplars and ex. of statistic f.; 12.A1, ex. of statistic f. by p.o. trib., as security for app. apt. of p.m.; IX.4.A17, statistic f. and relevant and irrelevant occurrences; A56, ex. by ministers collectively in regard to persons, things, money, and occurrences; A56, defined; A56, and directive f.; 5.A17, and accountableness; 7.1st.Al, original information v. reminiscences; A l, needful v. needless information, relative distinction; A2, general topics for consideration in ex. of statistic f.; A3–5, ends in view: max. good, min. evil; A4, usefulness of ex. of f. in proportion to clearness, correctness, and completeness of the results; A6, subject matter of registration; A7, periods of relative time: entrance, continuance, exit; A7–8, application to use and relative time; A9, desirable properties for entries: clearness, correctness, pg 601comprehensiveness, and symmetry; A10, symmetry explained; A11, service books v. loss books; A12, service books: outset v. journal books; A12, outset books: original v. periodical; A12, generic v. specific books; A12, specific books: personal, immovable, movable, money, occurrence books; A12, subspecific books: entrance, continuation exit; A13, original outset book defined; A14, journal books defined; Al5, periodical outset books defined; Al5, solar year v. service year; A16, superbooks v. subbooks; A17–22, uses of books delineated; A17–18, use of service books: aggregate v. particular uses; A19–22, uses of loss books, aggregate v. particular; A23, offices defined; A23, books to be kept by all offices; A23, head office v. suboffices; A23, books v. subbooks; 5th.A1, subsidiary books: retroacceptation and retrotransmission books; A2, provision for additional books; 6th, A1, use of abbreviations in ex. of statistic f. determined by leg.; A2, arguments for and against practice; A3–5, rules for abbreviations enumerated; A5n, use of abbreviations in mathematics and application to ex. of statistic f.; A5n, Italian bookkeeping nomenclature criticized; A5n, use of Latin abbreviations in English practice; A6, securities for correct and complete entries enumerated; 9.A3, ex. of inspective f. to secure execution of statistic f.; 19.A4, leg. to determine which register books to be kept in each grade in ex. of statistic f.; 23.A5, statistic f. and indirect remedies against peculation; 25.A3, ex. by p.o. trib. as security for app. apt. of ministers; A4, character index as instrument of security; (ii) Original outset book(s): IX.7.1st.A13, defined; 2nd.Al, (a) personal stock book, headings of entries; A2, uses of entries; A3, particular importance in subdepts., with large employment of personnel; A4, (b) immovable stock book, headings of entries; A5, uses of entries; A6, (c) movable stock book, headings of entries; A7, mimographical or receptacular mode of registration; A8, uses of mimographical mode; A9, subdepts. where most applicable; A10–25, mimographical mode discussed; A26, headings under which articles belonging to movable stock may be listed; A27–9, (d) money stock book, headings of entries; A30, entries made in suboffices to serve as checks; (iii) Journal books: IX.7.1st.A14, defined; 3rd.Al, pertains to interior occurrences subsequent to day of outset; A2, time periods to be mentioned: entrance, continuation, and exit; A3, operation performed at entrance: receipt; A4, operation performed with continuation: application to use; A5, operations performed at exit listed; A6, specific books listed: personal, movable, immovable, and money stock books; A7, subspecific books listed: entrance, application, exit; A8, (a) personal stock book: entrance book, headings of entries; A9, application book, headings of entries; A10, exit book, headings of entries; A11, uses of books listed; A12, obligation of giving evidence; A13, estimating value of service; A14, (b) immovable stock book: entrance book: limited use; A15, application book: headings of entries; A15, application to profit v. loss; A16, exit book: headings of entries; A17, headings of entries for additions to immovable stock; A18, (c) movable stock book: entrance book, headings of entries; A19, application book, principal v. subsidiary or instrumental modes; A20, principal mode: transformative v. conjunctive modes of application; A21, headings of entries; A22, use of entries; A23, exit or issue book: headings of entries; A25, (d) money book: entrance or receipt book, headings of entries; A26, application book, none; A27–8, exit or issue book, headings of entries; A29, headings also applicable to movables; A30, (e) exterior occurrence book, subdepts. where most applicable; A31, headings of entries; A32, information to be traced to its sources; (iv) Loss pg 602books: IX.7.1st.A11, loss books v. service books; A19–22, uses listed; 4th.A1, subject matter v. efficient cause; A2, subject matter of loss: personal service, things movable, things immovable, money; A3, efficient causes of loss: purely human agency, purely natural agency, mixed agency; A4–5, (a) loss of personal service: examples given; A6, (b) loss of things immovable: examples given; A7, (c) loss of things movable: examples given; A8, dangers of fraud in selling; A9, subdepts. most exposed to danger of fraud: navy, finance; A10, p.o. trib. to watch for fraud; A11, spontaneous deterioration, efficient causes; A12, spontaneous destruction, efficient causes; A13, natural durability of things, examples given; A14, age may increase or diminish value of stock; A15, effect of age on persons; A16, effect of age on things; A17, headings of entries where effect of age relevant; Al8, things, length of time in use, considered; A19, movable things subject to loss listed; A20, (d) loss of money, examples given; A21, for prevention of loss, one person responsible for each article; A22, one person responsible for loss by assistants and deputes; A23, responsibility of inspectors v. custodients; A24, individual responsibility: rule and principle; A25, A26, A30, estimated value of loss, headings of entries; A27, entries made by directing functionaries; A28, p.m. to secure entries by ministers in each subdept.; A29, p.o. trib. to judge veracity of entries; A30, entries in loss book to avoid insincerity while fulfilling obligation to make entries; A31, causes of loss by human agency, examples given; A32–3, stockin-hand books. See EVIDENCE; MIMOGRAPHICAL MODE OF REGISTRATION; REGISTRATION SYSTEM; REGISTRATIVE FUNCTION
SUBDEPARTMENT(S): IV.A10, within administrative dept., there are 13 subdepts.; IX.2.A2, subdepts. headed by ministers; A2, number of subdepts. To ministers; A9, potentially united subdepts., examples given; 26.A7, use of publicity and secrecy varies from subdept. to subdept. See MINISTER(S); ARMY, DOMAIN, EDUCATION, ELECTION, FINANCE, FOREIGN RELATION, HEALTH, INDIGENCE RELIEF, INTERIOR COMMUNICATION, LEGISLATION, NAVY, PREVENTIVE SERVICE, TRADE SUBDEPARTMENTS
SUBDISTRICT(S): I.A4, each district is divided into subdistricts; A4, each subdistrict is a voting district; A4, sends deputy to subleg.; A4, territory of immediate judicatory; A4, subdistricts listed; A5, each subdistrict divided into bis-subdistricts, which is territory of the local headman; A5, further division named tris-subdistrict; A6(inst.diss.), tris-subdistrict furthest division envisaged; IV.A12, one seat in subleg. for each subdistrict; V.2.A4, constitutive authority in subdistricts elect members of subleg. See SUBLEGISLATURE(S)
SUBLEGISLATURE(S): I.A3, district is territory of subleg.; A4, each subdistrict as voting district sends deputy to subleg.; IV.A9, each district has a subleg. under the leg.; A11, subleg. and local and logical fields of service; A12, subleg., many seated, one seat for each subdistrict; V.2.A4, constitutive authority ex. locative f. in sending deputies to sublegs.; A5, members of sublegs., dislocable by constitutive authority ; A6, officials dislocable by constitutive authority belonging to each district; 3.A2–3, locative f., how ex. by constitutive authority; A5, dislocative f., how ex. by constitutive authority; VI.1.A5, dependence of subleg. on authority of supreme leg.; A6, where non-performance or inaptitude, leg. can take over fs. of subleg.; 3.A1–4, leg. ex. directive, corrective, and arbitrative fs. in relation to sublegs.; 25.A52–3, temporary non-relocability system and supply of men for sublegs.; 31.A1, pg 603sublegs, and all-pervading system of securities; VII. 12, encroachment by leg. on subleg. discussed; VIII.8.A6, method of choosing p.m. applicable to p.m. of sublegs.; A6, usefulness of experimentation in sublegs.; IX.2.A6, subminister is to subleg. as minister is to leg.; A7, subprime minister is to subleg. as p.m. is to leg.; 8.A38, ex. of statistic, recordative, publicative, and requisitive fs. by subleg.; 10.A24, need for sublegs., due to abuses in distant provinces; 14.A3&n, sublegs, and uninterrupted sittings of leg. See LEGISLATURE; SUBDISTRICT(S): SUBMINISTER(S)
SUBMINISTER(S): IV.A13, one subminister for each subdept. of district; V.2.A6, dislocable by constitutive authority belonging to district; IX.2.A4, A6, minister v. subminister. See SUBLEGISLATURE(S)
SUBORDINATE AND SUPERORDINATE: II.A17, and responsible location principle; VII.12, encroachment by leg. on subordinate authorities; VIII.1.A6, 'prime minister' implying subordination and superordination; A7, Spanish 'gefe politico', only superordination; 2.A5–6, dislocation of subordinates by p.m.; 12.A1, p.m. responsible for subordinates, as security for app. apt.; A1, checks to arbitrary appointment by p.m., by location system, as security for app. apt.; IX.3.A15, A17, subordination and superordination and number in an office; 5.A1, scale of subordination, subordination grades necessary; A2, subordination presupposes superordination; A2, modes of inferiority and superiority ; A3, power is efficient cause of subordination; A4, mode of power ex. in subordination; A5–6, fs. superordinate must ex. to be responsible for subordinate's misconduct; A7, administration v. judiciary; A8, scale of subordination—grades enumerated; A9, highest grade taken as starting point for scale; A9, lower grades continually vary; A10–13, superordinateness v. superiority; subordinateness v. inferiority; A13–16, inferiority in power v. inferiority at large; A17, A19–20, subordinateness and accountableness; A18, obligation of subordinates v. powers and rights of superordinates; A21, subordinateness and responsibility; A22–4, superordinateness, superiority, and remuneration; A25, where need of direction, rank in scale of subordination required; A26–7, instances noted where subordination required due to need of account giving, but not direction; A28–30, distance between functionaries and need for direction; A31, to finance minister, all functionaries accountable in respect of money, but not subordinate; A32, leg. to establish initially and vary the number of grades in each subdept.; A33–4, subdepts. With smallest number of grades: election and legislation; A35, largest number in army subdept.; A36–41, number of functionaries in highest grades and English v. American practice in armies and navies; A42, legislation subdept. To have smallest number of grades; A43, degree of subordination of registrars limited by need to record acts of superiors; A44, lowest grade of subordination, writing clerk; A45, but not lowest pay; A46–7, grades v. official situations; A48, rule as to number of grades in subdept.; 15.A45, remuneration of superordinates for work done by subordinates, injustice; 17.A10, receipt by superordinates of exemplars of instrument of location; A12, advertisement for subordinates to minister, made by ministers; A20, pain of humiliation when subordinate rises to position above superordinate; A43–4, pecuniary competition principle its application in location, situation of simple trust, and situation of trust and talent; 18.A7–10, dislocation of minister by judge; 19.A1, leg. to allot to subordinates in subdepts. grades with distinctive fields of service and functions; A2, subordinate subject to directive f. ex. by superordinate; A3, exceptions to be made by leg.; A4, leg. to determine which pg 604register books to be kept in each grade; A5, leg. to determine which grades need to ex. self-suppletive f.; A6, and requisitive f.; A7, and meliorationsuggestive f.; A8, subordinate's term of service is for life; A9, exceptions stated; A10, reason given as security against arbitrary dislocation; A11, leg. To apply rules of attendance to each subordinate position; A12, no increase in remuneration for continuance in office, reasons given; A13, nor for length of service in official establishment; A14, nor for longevity, reasons given; A15, leg. to determine to which subordinate position the principles of location system can be applied; A16, subordinates located, initiative f. by minister, consummative f. by p.m.; A17, considerations of distance; A18–19, securities in filling vacancies; A19, security against dislocation by p.m.; A20, why security for despatch in filling vacancies; A21–2, minister to have choice in filling vacancies; A21–2, depute permanent not automatic choice; A21, A23–7, minister to have powers but not obliged to repeat qualification examination; A21, A27, pecuniary competition may be repeated in filling vacancies but not obligatory ; A21, A28, promotion not to be used in filling vacancies; A29, distribution of power, grade, and emolument, non-military v. military service; A30, necessity to avoid dissolution, resignation or revolt dictates correspondence of power and emolument in scale of subordination in military service; A30, no necessity present in non-military service; A31, system of Catherine the Second of Russia wrongly bases non-military service on analogy with military service; A32, permanent v. temporary functionaries for government fabrication, leg. to decide; A33, examples given; A34, permanent v. temporary employees in ex. of fabricative, reparative, and custoditive fs.; A35, succession by official age in corrupt government; A36, use of lot preferred to choice in corrupt government; A37, for meritorious service no augmentation of emolument necessary; A38, private v. public practice; A39, extra-merit, only basis of extra remuneration; A40, subordinates dislocable by ministers; A41, exceptions in military service; A42, leg. to determine when distance requires suspension by subordinate to minister, pending decision by minister regarding dislocation; A43, examples given; 25.A3, responsibility of ministers for apt. of immediate subordinates as security for app. apt.; A26–7, responsibility of ministers for subordinates defined; A28, presumption of culpable deficiency with respect to minister's vigilance, examples given; A29, role of p.o. trib. where minister's vigilance is deficient. See INSUBORDINATION; LOCATION AND DISLOCATION; OPPRESSION
SUBPRIME MINISTER(S): IV.A13, one subprime minister for each subleg.; V.2.A6, dislocable by constitutive authority belonging to district; IX.2.A7, p.m. v. subprime minister. See PRIME MINISTER; SUBLEGISLATURE(S); SUBMINISTER(S)
SUBSISTENCE: VII.2, max. of national subsistence as positive end of government
SUITOR(S): VI.27.A47–8, tax on suitors and English judicial practice; IX.1.A2, A3, prevention of evil to suitors; A4, 20.A3, suitor defined; A7, and quasiinsubordination; A24, leg. to determine which grades to have securities against disturbance and non-compliance by suitors; 21.A4, suitors as oppressees; pg 605A5, examples given; A20, and use of incidental complaint book; 25.A12, and visitor's deportment rules; 26.A2, affected by evils of delay, vexation, and expense; A3, app. architectural arrangements reduce evils to both functionaries and suitors; A21–35, arrangements for oral communication with functionaries with use of waiting boxes, public and private. See ARCHITECTURE; OPPRESSION; PUBLIC OPINION TRIBUNAL
SUPPLETION: IX.5.A4, power of, necessary to subordination. See SUPPLETIVE FUNCTION
SUPPLETIVE FUNCTION: IX.5.A4, ex. in scale of subordination; A5, temporarily suppletive f. must accompany directive power; A5, superordinates must have power to ex. permanently suppletive f.; 25.A26, ex. of suppletive f. and responsibility of ministers for subordinates. See SELF-SUPPLETIVE FUNCTION; SUPPLETION
SUPPLY AND DEMAND: IX.7.1st.A18, use of service books to estimate
SUPREME: IV.A7, use of 'supreme' authority discussed; V.2.A3, 'supreme legislature' called 'legislature'
SUSPENSION: VIII.2.A7, defined as temporary dislocation; A11, p.m. and army subdept.; A13, and navy; A14, authenticating instruments; A15, use of manifold writing system; A16, arrangements for redress; IX.4.A44, bissubmode of location, allective and compulsive; 5.A4, power of, necessary to subordination; 17.A31&n, locative f., mode of ex. and avoidance of suspension; 18.A2, suspension as mode of modified dislocation; 19.A42, suspension by subordinate to minister, leg. to decide when distance so occasions; A43, examples given; 20.A25, suspension and non-compliance by subordinate to direction of superordinate; 21.A47, suspension of functionary may be effected by either the immediate or any other superordinate of functionary, reasons given; A54, application of dislocation instrument to suspension, heads of entries; A55–6, rules for time of suspension and renewal; A57, causes of termination of suspension; A58, minutes of record attached to instrument; A59, when dislocation warranted; A74, arrangements for exemplars of record and suspension instrument; 25.A26, A28, and responsibility of ministers for subordinates. See LOCATION AND DISLOCATION; PROMOTION; SUBORDINATE AND SUPERORDINATE; SUSPENSIVE FUNCTION; TRANSFER
SUSPENSIVE FUNCTION: IX.5.A4, ex. in scale of subordination; A5, must accompany directive f.; A6, to make superordinate responsible for subordinate's misconduct; 25.A26, and responsibility of minister for subordinates. See LOCATION AND DISLOCATION; SUBORDINATE AND SUPERORDINATE; SUSPENSION
SWITZERLAND: I.A6(inst.diss.), Swiss canton and division of territory of state
TASTE(S): VH.4, legislator not to impose standard of taste on fellow-citizens
TAXATION: V.6.A3, taxation of political tracts by leg. is anti-constitutional; VII.6, no tax on judicial services; IX.17.A53, to reject pecuniary competition system is to increase taxation
TERM OF SERVICE: VI.22.A1, the shorter the term of service for leg., the better; A2–3, exceptions for distance from leg.; A4, settled arrangements for elections favoured; A5, practice in monarchies; A6, U.S. practice; 24.A10, term of leg. one year, or two years where problem of distance; 31.A42, term of service and securities for app. apt. of legislators; VIII.2.A5, term of service pg 606of principal and location of deputes; 5.A1, p.m.'s term of service—4 years suggested; A2, no relocation until choice of several available; A3, arrangements for elections; A4, leg.'s failure to hold election; 6.A2, term of service of p.m. and relation to leg.; IX.13.A1, minister's term of service, for life; A2, ministers v. legislators; A3, dislocation and securities for app. apt.: minister v. legislator; 19.A8, subordinates continue in office for life; A9, exceptions noted; A10, reasons given, as security against arbitrary dislocation. See LOCATION AND DISLOCATION; RELOCATION
THEORY AND PRACTICE: IX.17.A59, and English practice; 17.Con.Inst.A2, good in theory, but unsound in practice, as fallacy; 19.A31n, distinction between theory and practice examined
THINGS: VI.27.A12, things and sources of evidence; VIII.1.A3, things and p.m.'s logical field of service; IX.4.A5, things v. persons; A5, real entities comprised of things and persons; A6, fictitious things v. fictitious persons; A6, fictitious entities comprised of fictitious things and fictitious persons; A7, things incorporeal as fictitious entities; A10, immovables and movables; A13, occurrences of things named states and motions; A18, written instruments as things; A45–6, fs. regarding things: procurative; A47, and requisitive f.; A48, custoditive; A49, applicative; A50, reparative; A51, transformative; A52–3, eliminative; A54–5, inspective; A56, statistic; A57, registrative; A58, publicative; A59, officially informative or report-making; A61, meliorationsuggestive; A64, things belonging to each subdept.: edifice, land, furniture, stationery, instruments for lighting, heating, and cooling; 8.A7, requisitive f. ex. in regard to things; 20.A21, physical force and things. See STATISTIC FUNCTION
TIME: VI.27.A6, time and leg.'s undertaking to ex. elicitative f. ; A50, time factor and impotence of House of Commons in eliciting evidence; A51, in House of Lords; 28.A6, time and leg. taking on legislation penal judicatory; 31.A39, time for judicial decisions in English practice; VII. 12, use of time and encroachment on subordinate authorities by member of leg.; VIII.11.A8, time limit to secrecy to min. evil; A14, time and rules for limiting secrecy; IX.25.A1, time in relation to application of securities; Al, antecedential v. concomitant v. consequential, as relative points of time. See DELAY; STATISTIC FUNCTION
TRADE MINISTER: IX.2.A1, serves under p.m.; 9.A7, joint visits in ex. of inspective f. See TRADE SUBDEPARTMENT
TRADE SUBDEPARTMENT: IX.2.A10, potentially joined with finance subdept.; 9.A4, offices to be visited in ex. of inspective f. See MINISTER(S); TRADE MINISTER
TRANSFER: VIII.2.A11, p.m. and army subdept.; A13, and navy; A14, authenticating instruments; A15, use of manifold writing system; A16, arrangements for redress; IX.4.A44, transfer as bis-submode of location; 18.A2, transfer as modes of modified dislocation: permanent and temporary, to the same, inferior or superior grades; 20.A25, transfer and non-compliance of subordinate to direction of super ordinate; 21.A43, minister may transfer subordinate or superordinate as result of decree of dislocation judicatory; A46, only minister, p.m. and leg. to effect transfer without consent of functionary; A60, application of dislocation instrument to permanent transference to grade not inferior, heads of entry; A61, temporary transference, headings of entry; A62, transference with and without blame; A63, except where vacancy, transference involves at least two functionaries; A64, permanent transference to pg 607inferior grade, headings of entry; A65, temporary transference to inferior grade, headings of entry; A66, word 'transference' preferred to 'degradation'; A67, temporary transference to inferior grade, as punishment; A75, arrangements for exemplars of record and instruments. See LOCATION AND DISLOCATION; PROMOTION; SUBORDINATE AND SUPERORDINATE; SUSPENSION; TRANSFERENTIAL FUNCTION
TRANSFERENTIAL FUNCTION: IX.5.A4, power of, useful to subordination; 21.A43, minister to ex. in light of decree of dislocation judicatory. See SUBORDINATE AND SUPERORDINATE; TRANSFER
TRANSFORMATIVE FUNCTION: IX.4.A51, ex. by ministers collectively in regard to things; A51, defined
TRANSMISSIVE FUNCTION: IX.23.A14, peculation v. embezzlement and ex. of transmissive f. See PROCURATIVE FUNCTION
TRANSRECEPTIVE FUNCTION: See PROCURATIVE FUNCTION
TRIS-SUBDISTRICTS: See SUBDISTRICTS
TYRANNY: V.6.A5, and suppression of opposite opinions; VI.25.A51, and liberty of the press in England; 27.A27, 'tyrannical dominion' and nonattendance of deputies due to participation in elicitation process; IX.10.A25, English lord ex. tyranny over distant dependencies; 16.A24n, tyranny and election of directors at India House; 20.A12, secret institutions and tyranny; 25.A43, tyranny of few over many in following precedents; A57, and English practice. See DESPOTISM; ENGLISH PRACTICE
UNDERSTANDING: See WILL
UNITED STATES OF AMERICA (ANGLO-AMERICAN UNITED STATES): VI.20.A18, and interrupted attendance of leg.; A20, president's message to congress; A21, insolvency laws; 22.A6, term of service of legislators; 25.A9, competition in election of legislators; A43, problems of app. apt. in founding new states; A50, liberty of press; 27.A49, U.S. government v. English government as least corrupt forms; 31.A28–30, lawyer class and securities for app. apt.; VIII.1.A8–10, use of 'president' v. 'prime minister' discussed; 2.A11n, power of president as commander-in-chief; A12, as commander-in-chief, U.S. president not necessarily military man; 3.A6n, U.S. practice and p.m.'s ex. of initiative f. in messages to leg.; IX.3.A16, single-seated executive depts.; A17, power of president over executive dept, heads, absolute; 5.A16, distinctions in diplomatic service; A30, distance between functionaries; A39, A41, grades in military service, expense min.; 15.A37, ultra-remuneration has no place; 26.A20n, and Panopticon plan; A53, offices of president and ministers, how arranged
UTILITY AND INUTILITY: VI.27.A52, inutility of House of Lords; IX.17.A44, intrinsic utility and reason for pecuniary competition; 19.A7, relative utility and ex. of self-suppletive f.
VALUE: IX.25.A36, elements of, magnitude, propinquity, and probability
VENALITY: IX.17.A54, competition system does not introduce venality into office; A54, word misapplied to bidding system; A54, venality and corruption, both prevented; A55, virtue of liberality derived from vice of venality in city of London
pg 608VENDITIVE FUNCTION: IX.23.A14, peculation and ex. of venditive f. See ELIMINATIVE FUNCTION
VEXATION: VI.23.A11, prevention of vexation and deputy's substitute; A19, vexation caused by election of deputy's substitute at end of session; A21, vexation caused by election of substitutes; 27.A l 7–18, delay, vexation and expense and limits to extraction of evidence by leg.; A28, avoiding delay, vexation, and expense and use of elicitation committees; 31.A28, delay, vexation and expense and common law; VII.6, vexation equal to a tax; IX.20.A9, modes of vexation. See DELAY; EXPENSE; GOOD AND EVIL
VISITATIVE FUNCTION: See INSPECTIVE FUNCTION
VOTATIVE FUNCTION: IX.24.A2, ministers may not ex. votative f. in leg.
VOTING (VOTATION): VIII.8.A2–4, election of p.m. by leg. given first in secret mode and then in open mode; A5, reaching a majority; A6, secret v. open voting discussed; 11.A6, evil of publicity of secret vote; IX.16.A22, decree of qualification judicatory formed by secret and open modes of voting; A23, method of secret voting, example given; A24, mode of giving in votes; A24n, East India Company practice noted; A25, mode of scrutiny of votes; A25n, practice at Woolwich Academy noted; A25n, possible use of lot where equality; A26, open mode of voting, mode of procedure; A27, performed after secret mode, but before votes made by secret mode are examined; A28–9, votes of quasi-jurymen, secret mode only; A29, as quasi-jurymen serve as instructors, each has interest of highest rank for his pupils; A29n, size of body of candidates prohibits each to judge each other, as is practice at Glasgow University and Hazelwood School; A30, results of both modes of voting published in ranking table at same time; A31, both modes to be guides; A32, provision for experiment and choice among various modes of voting; 26.A8–9, voting and secret suffrage. See CONSTITUTIVE AUTHORITY; ELECTION CODE; LEGISLATURE; LOCATION AND DISLOCATION
VOTING DISTRICT(S): See SUBDISTRICT(S)
WAR(S): VII.8, war, when justified; IX.7.4th.A31, expenditure on needless wars; 25.A24, war, publicity, and secrecy for extra dispatch
WASTE: II.A16n, waste as evil; VII.4, waste and corruption; IX.15.A7, liberality by functionary is waste; A35, and English monarchy; A48, and hereditary titles of honour; 19.A27, rule that superior grade leads to superior emolument, source of waste. See CORRUPTION; ENGLISH PRACTICE; GOOD AND EVIL; EXPENSE; STATISTIC FUNCTION
WEALTH: See OPULENCE AND INDIGENCE
WILL: VI.1.A9, will v. judgement in deputy's duty to constituents; 23.A12, will actually expressed v. will intended to be expressed in leg.; 24.A18, will, understanding, and influence
WRITTEN INSTRUMENT(S): VI.27.A39–40, legislation enquiry report as written instrument; IX.4.A18, defined; A19, distinguishable as relevant and irrelevant, important and unimportant, interior and exterior; A20, by functionary or non-functionary ; A21, persons writing v. persons addressed; A22, instruments created by act of registrative f. addressed to public; A38, written forms prepared for giving expression to mandates and replies; A39, all-comprehensive formulary applicable to judiciary dept.; 7.2nd.A14, called papers; A14, and mimographical mode of registration. See LAW OR MANDATE
WRONG: See RIGHT AND WRONG
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