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Editor’s Note83

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Editor’s Note
If Lesbia is the famous Clodia (see Introd., pp. xiv ff.), this poem must be earlier than the death of Clodia's husband, Q. Metellus Celer, in 59 b.c. For the point cf. 92.
Editor’s Note
1. mi … mala plurima dicit : cf. Plaut. Cist. 233 'mala multa dici mihi uolo', Cic. Att. viii. 5. 1 'multa mala cum dixisset—suo capiti ut aiunt'.
Editor’s Note
2. haec … laetitia est : 'this is sheer delight to him'. For the idiomatic 'attraction' of the pronoun cf. 5 below 'quae multo acrior est res', 76. 15 'una salus haec est'.
Critical Apparatus
83. 3 mulle X
Editor’s Note
3. mule : the mule was notorious in ancient as in modern times for tarditas indomita (Pliny, N.H. viii. 171): as a type of stupidity it does not appear elsewhere, unless Juv. 16. 23 mulino corde Vagelli, where the meaning is uncertain, has that implication. But the reference here must be to insensibility: a reference to childlessness (though it would be true) would have no point in the context. Garrod's suggestion (C.R. xxxiii [1919], 67) that mule is intended as an easily penetrable disguise for Metelle is based on dubious premisses (Metellus, like many cognomina, is a common noun, but Festus's statement that it means mercennarius may be right in spite of his derivation of it from metallum and the case for the meaning 'pack-horse' is not proved) and assumes too elaborate an artifice (pulcer at 79. 1, if it is a reference to Clodius' cognomen, is much more obvious).
Editor’s Note
nihil sentis : 'you are not alive to anything'; cf. 17. 20.
Critical Apparatus
4 sanna O, samia G, samia al. sana R
Editor’s Note
4. sana : i.e. free from the morbus of love: cf. Tib. (Sulp.) iv. 6. 17 'uritur ut celeres urunt altaria flammae / nec, liceat quamuis, sana fuisse uelit'; Ov. Rem. Am. 493 'et sanum simula ne si quid forte dolebis / sentiat.'
Editor’s Note
gannit : properly of a dog's growl or snarl: for the use of a human being cf. Ter. Ad. 556 'quid ille gannit?', Afran. fr. 283 R. 'gannire ad aurem numquam didici dominicam', Mart. v. 60. 2 'gannitibus improbis lacessas'; similarly oggannire in Plaut. Asin. 422 '… quin centiens eadem imperem atque ogganiam', Ter. Phorm. 1030.
Editor’s Note
quod gannit : the quod-clause is adverbial, 'as for her snarling': cf. 10. 28, 68. 27.
Critical Apparatus
6 hec V: corr. G
Editor’s Note
6. hoc est, uritur et loquitur : 'that is to say' (summing up the situation) 'she is burning with passion and so she talks'. To modern taste loquitur is a weak repetition which makes the epigram lame. Hence the correction of Dousa and Lipsius, coquitur, accepted by some editors: for coquo in this sense cf. Enn. Ann. 336 V. 'curam … quae nunc te coquit', Plaut. Trin. 225 'egomet me coquo et macero et defetigo', Virg. Aen. vii. 345 'femineae ardentem curaeque iraeque coquebant'. hoc est will then explain meminitiratast: she has not forgotten me (meminit—uritur) and she is worked up about it (irata est—coquitur). But the repetitions in 82. 2–4 and 103. 2–4 are just as weak and coquitur is over-ingenious.
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