Gary Taylor, John Jowett, Terri Bourus, and Gabriel Egan (eds), The New Oxford Shakespeare: Critical Reference Edition, Vol. 2

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'Tenn in the hundred'

pg 3659

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Notes

Critical Apparatus
1–2 Tenn … saued dobyns; not in fane, burghe
Critical Apparatus
1 here lyeth engraued dobyns; must lie in his graue redmer; by ye laws you may haue christ church; the Devill allowes aubrey; lies here engrav'd rowe; here lyes engraued taylor
Critical Apparatus
2 A … saued dobyns; But Twenty in' th hundred the diuel doth craue christ church; But Combes will have twelve he swears & vowes aubrey
Critical Apparatus
2 A dobyns; But redmer; 'Tis rowe
Critical Apparatus
2 his … saued dobyns; whether God will him haue? redmer
Critical Apparatus
2 nere saued dobyns; not sav'd rowe; not saued taylor. burrow suspects taylor's emendation resulted from mistaking dobyns's 'nere' as 'now'.
Critical Apparatus
3 If…lyes dobyns; Who then must be interr'd redmer; Hay hay sayth Tom toule who is fane
Critical Apparatus
3 If…aske dobyns; not in burghe
Critical Apparatus
3 anny one dobyns; any christ church; any Man rowe
Critical Apparatus
3 lyes burghe; lyeth dobyns. By the time of dobyns, the -eth form is used considerably less often in print: EEBOTCP returns 6,575 uses of 'lyeth'/'lieth' in 1,327 books between 1660 and 1675, and 21,738 uses of 'lyes'/'lies'. The two forms are used in relatively equal measure around the likely time of composition: 'lyeth'/'lieth', 7,353 used in 1,067 books; 'lyes'/'lies', 8,114 in 1,398. The meter calls for a monosyllable here, which makes 'lyes' the most likely reading. dobyns may have erroneously picked it up from the first line, where 'lyeth' is the necessary word.
Critical Apparatus
4 Oh ho dobyns; Oh redmer; Bau wough christ church; Ho ho fane; hough burghe; Hoh! aubrey
Critical Apparatus
4 tis my dobyns; my redmer; 'tis my sonn fane2, burghe
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