Gerard Tracey (ed.), The Letters and Diaries of John Henry Newman, Vol. 8: Tract 90 and the Jerusalem Bishopric: January 1841 to April 1842

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pg 613Index of Persons and Places

References are given to The Dictionary of National Biography, The Dictionary of American Biography, or to Frederick Boase, Modern English Biography. Some of the information is derived from correspondence and other material in the archives of the Birmingham Oratory, and from various private sources. All Colleges referred to are of Oxford, except where otherwise specified. In this volume places have been cited together with subject entries under 'Newman, john henry'.

Abbott (VII), Edward Samuel, 38, 203.
Abeken, Reverend Heinrich Ludwig, Theol. Lic., Chaplain to the Prussian Legation at Rome and great personal friend of C. C. J. Bunsen. In 1842 he published A Letter to E. B. Pusey in Reference to certain Charges against the German Church, contained in his Letter to . . . the Archbishop of Canterbury, 7, 29, 39.
Abraham, Charles John (1814–93), went from Eton to King's College, Cambridge in 1832, and was a Fellow of King's from 1836–49. From 1839–49 he worked as a Master at Eton, and in the following year went out to New Zealand to join Bishop Selwyn and became Principal of St John's College, Auckland. In 1858 he was consecrated first Bishop of Wellington and he remained there until 1870 when he returned to England as Coadjutor Bishop of Lichfield. Abraham was one of the guiding figures behind the foundation of Selwyn College, Cambridge. (DNB), 19–20.
Acland (VII), Arthur Henry Dyke (1811–57), 45, 117, 171, 177, 179, 183, 186, 188–9, 191, 201, 203, 266, 271, 276, 356–7, 362, 396.
Acland (VI), Thomas Dyke (1809–98), 3, 35, 37, 117, 175, 208–9, 219, 343, 349–50.
Adams, William (1814–48), was educated at Eton, gained a Postmastership at Merton College, and in 1836 took a double first. In the following year he became a Fellow and Tutor, and in 1840 he succeeded W. K. Hamilton as Vicar of St Peter's-in-the-East. He was renowned for his pastoral zeal. A bathing accident when visiting Eton in 1842 led to the onset of a fatal lung condition. In his years of illness he composed a number of sacred allegories which proved to very popular, the best known being The Shadow of the Cross (1842). (DNB), 285.
Addison, Berkeley (1815–82), entered Peterhouse, Cambridge in 1835, B.A. 1839, M.A. 1842. Ordained deacon in 1839 and priest in 1840, he went to Brighton to work as a curate to H. M. Wagner. After he was appointed Domestic Chaplain to the Earl of Caithness, he was also Rector of Collyhurst, Manchester, from 1855–61, and then Vicar of Jesmond, Newcastle-on-Tyne, until his death. He was for some years Chairman of Newcastle School Board. (Boase I), 20, 206, 215, 230.
Aitken (VII), Robert (1800–73), 240, 246, 298, 302, 310, 312, 316, 394, 413, 419, 436, 456, 488, 513.
Aitkens or Aitkin, for Aitken, Robert.
Albert Francis Charles Augustus Emmanuel (1819–61), Prince Consort of England, second son of Ernest, Duke of Saxe-Coburg-Gotha, had visited England first in 1836, before spending some time at the University of Bonn. On his return to England three years later, arrangements were made for his marriage to the, by then, Queen Victoria. The ceremony took place in 1840, and, for a while, a strained situation led to many of his actions being misconstrued. His benevolent feelings which led him to support many public movements won round a public which shared in the sorrow of the Queen at his early death from typhoid fever. (DNB), 205, 212, 322, 417.
Alexander, Michael Solomon (1799–1845), was brought up in Germany in the Jewish faith, but, having come to work in England as a private tutor, converted to Christianity in 1825. Two years later he took Anglican orders, and from 1832 to 1841 was Professor of Hebrew at King's College, London. In the latter year, he was, controversially, consecrated first Bishop of the United Church of England and Ireland in Jerusalem. While travelling to visit England, he died of heart disease near Cairo. (DNB), 288, 290–5, 307, 370, 374.
Allies, Thomas William (1813–1903), was educated at Eton and at Wadham College, where he was Fellow from 1833–41. Chaplain to Bishop Blomfield of London for two years, his strong Tractarian sentiments led to a move to the living of Launton, Oxon. Although greatly influenced by Newman's teaching, he maintained a 'patriarchal' theory of the Church in The Church of England cleared from the Charge of Schism, 1846. He became a Catholic in 1850, though with little means to support his family. Newman appointed him Lecturer in History at the Catholic University pg 614of Ireland in 1855, and he was Secretary of the Catholic Poor School Committee from 1853–90. He wrote a series of volumes on The Formation of Christendom. He always revered Newman greatly, writing in his journal after an 1844 visit to Littlemore of 'the greatest man the English Church in her separated state has ever produced, and a saint', and, in 1890, of 'his glorious life as a witness of the truth.' M. H. Allies, T W. Allies, London 1907, pp. 47, 178. (DNB), 355–6.
Anderdon, John Lavicount (1792–1874), attended Dr Nicholas's School at Ealing, and later moved to Eton. He left school at an early age to enter the business of William Manning, M.P., in which he became a partner upon his marriage to Anna Maria Manning, older sister of Henry Edward. A passionately keen angler, a walking tour of Dovedale suggested to him the compilation of a volume on the subject. Anderdon was a deeply religious man, and he published several devotional works, and a Life of Bishop Ken. (DNB), 298.
Anderdon (VI), William Henry (1816–90), 293, 435, 465, 502.
Anderson (VI), Charles Henry John (1804–91), 288, 319, 428–9, 434.
Anderson (VI), Robert V., 353.
Andrews, Mr, 'of Virginia', probably C. W. Andrews, friend and colleague of the leading Episcopalian William Augustus Muhlenberg, 230.
Arnold (VI), Thomas (1795–1842), 103–4, 111, 222, 252, 291, 376, 379, 434, 439, 447, 450, 452.
Ashworth (VI), Arthur Howard, 202, 273, 285, 288.
Audland (VI), William Fisher, 13, 19, 521.
Awdry, Sir John (1795–1878), at Winchester and Christ Church, he was a Fellow of Oriel from 1820–30, where he became a friend of Keble. Called to the bar at the Middle Temple, he was a Judge in India from 1830–41 when he resigned his post and returned to England. He was Chairman of the Wiltshire Quarter Sessions from 1848–66. (Boase I), 217.
Bacchus, Selina (1817–50), was a great friend of M. R. Giberne, who went to live with her at Cheltenham around this time. Like Miss Giberne, she was deeply interested in the Oxford Movement and Newman's teaching. In Jan. 1846 she married George Copeland, brother of William John. She became a Catholic in 1848, and was followed by her husband in 1855, 503, 512.
Badeley (VI), Edward Lowth (1803–68), 55–6, 230, 232, 311, 348, 402, 408, 445–6, 449–50, 452, 458, 465.
Badham, Charles (1780–1845), medical writer and practitioner, M.D., Edinburgh, 1802;
M.A., Pembroke College, 1812, M.D. 1817. In 1827, he was appointed to the Chair of Physic at Glasgow University. He also published a translation of Juvenal, and was a keen traveller, particularly in Southern Europe. (DNB), 9.
Baines, Peter Augustine (1787–1843), Vicar Apostolic of the Western District from 1829, and purchaser of Prior Park, which he hoped to develop into a central seminary, and even a University for Catholics. His schemes led to dissension with the English Benedictines, to whom he had formerly belonged. (DNB), 9, 57.
Baker, Mr, 24.
Balston (VII), Francis (1819–91?), 20–1, 28, 196, 276, 279, 430.
Balston (VI), Henry (1816–40), 3, 4, 20.
Banister, E., 54, 61, 113, 146, 152, 383.
Barker (VI), Frederick Mills Raymond, 202, 205, 211, 261, 279, 514.
Barnard, Henry Watson, Rector of St Cuthbert's and Canon Residentiary of Wells. He died of cholera at Grenada, 217.
Barnes (VII), Thomas, blacksmith at Littlemore, 220.
Barrett, 342.
Barrow (VII), John (1810–80), 394, 522.
Barter (VII), Robert Speccott (1790–1861), 287, 352.
Barter (VI), William Brudenell (1788–1858), 202, 204, 287, 352, 368–9, 371, 384, 386, 401.
Bavin, William, servant at Oriel, who had died on 29 Dec. 1840, 7.
Baxter, printer in Oxford, used for the Library of the Fathers, 237, 274, 287, 466, 483.
Beaufort, Daniel Augustus, graduated from Jesus College, Cambridge, B.A. 1837, M.A. 1840, and was admitted ad eundem at Oxford in April 1841, at which time he was residing at '11 Gloucester Place Portman Square'. He was Rector of Lymm, Cheshire, from 1849–68, and of Warburton from 1849–72, 186.
Beaven (VI), James, 21, 24, 246, 251, 253, 266, 271.
Belaney (VII), Robert (1804–99), 21, 23–4, 147, 416, 418, 455.
Bellairs, Henry Walford (1812–1900), at Shrewsbury School, entered Corpus Christi College in 1831, migrated to New Inn Hall, and graduated B.A. in 1835, M.A. 1840. He was ordained deacon in 1835, priest in 1836, was Curate of Hunsingore from 1835–8, Perpetual Curate of Christ Church, Chester, in 1838, and Perpetual Curate of St Thomas, Stockport from 1840–4. In 1844 he was appointed to one of Her Majesty's Inspectorships of Schools, and a little later became Senior Inspector. Bellairs was an early advocate of the establishment of Oxford and Cambridge Local Examinations. In 1854 he founded Cheltenham Ladies College. He was the author of Tales of the Town (1843), The Teacher's Mission and Reward (1855), and The Church and the School;
or, Hints on Clerical Life (1868). (Boase IV), 216, 219, 235, 255–6, 288, 310, 326, 338, 378, 396–7, 415–16, 427, 457–8, 490, 492, 498, 500, 509–10.
Bellasis (VII), Edward (1800–73), 178, 199, 276, 400–3, 407–8, 413–15, 421, 445, 455, 458–9, 464–5, 489–90, 493, 497.
pg 615Bellman, Mrs Dinah, parishioner of St Mary's who died on 7 Aug. 1841. Newman, who had been assisting the family financially for some while, presented a gift of £10 after her death, 240.
Bergen or Berger, for Burger, Lewis.
Berkeley (VI), George Campion (1812–90), 4, 6, 16, 21, 23–4, 27, 35, 37–8, 93, 155, 158, 204–5, 209, 216, 219, 240, 253, 255, 288, 313, 336, 356–7, 371, 385, 394, 413, 429, 490–1, 493.
Bernard (VII), Thomas Dehany (1815–1904), 202.
Bethell, Christopher (1773–1859), graduated M.A. from King's College, Cambridge in 1799, and was Dean of Chichester from 1814–24. Appointed Bishop of Gloucester in 1824, he was translated to the wealthier see of Exeter for six months in 1830, and then to the even more lucrative see of Bangor where he remained. He published several theological works. (DNB), 348.
Betteris, Miss Caroline Esther, one of two families living in Newman's parish. She died in 1841 and Newman recorded her death in his book of anniversaries, 147,171,175,191, 216, 219.
Biber (VII), George Edward (1801–74), 445, 489.
Bickersteth, Edward (1786–1850), took up a post with the General Post Office around 1800, but twelve years later went into partnership with his brother-in-law who was a Norwich solicitor. His strong religious feelings led him to abandon law and seek ordination, and from 1816–30 he was one of the Secretaries of the Church Missionary Society, often acting as an itinerant 'deputation'. A moderate but firm Evangelical, Bickersteth was a leading opponent of the Oxford Movement. Though one of the founders of the Parker Society, he stated his approval of the Library of the Fathers. (DNB), 186, 354.
Biden (VII, 459–60), John Christopher, 461.
Birch, Mr, 416, 418.
Bird, Mr, probably for Birch.
Blanchard, Colonel, possibly Blanshard, Major, brother-in-law of R. F. Wilson, 206.
Blanco White (VII), Joseph (1775–1841), 194–6.
Blandy (VII), Francis Jackson, 184, 215.
Blew (VII), William John (1808–94), 219.
Blomfield (VI), Charles James (1786–1857), 14, 61, 99, 106–7, 110, 119–20, 122, 156, 205–6, 276–7, 288, 291, 295, 305, 343–4, 369, 381, 384–5, 408–9, 417, 467–8, 486–7, 491, 508, 514.
Bloxam, Andrew (1801–78), brother of John Rouse, was educated at Rugby, entered Worcester College in 1820, and was later elected to a Fellowship. A keen naturalist, in 1824 he accompanied a voyage to the Sandwich Islands, where he gathered a large collection of natural history specimens, which were later deposited in the British Museum. He took orders a few months after his return and was Perpetual Curate of Twycross, Leics., from 1839–71, when he took the living of Harborough Magna. (DNB), 27.
Bloxam (VI), John Rouse (1807–91), 3, 4, 11, 20, 21, 27–8, 38, 41–3, 48–52, 57, 67, 157, 162, 166, 170, 175, 177–8, 184, 210–11, 213–16, 219–20, 224, 268, 275–9, 313, 358, 395–6, 419, 427, 435, 459, 481, 493–4, 498, 501, 510–13.
Bliss (VI), James (1808–94), 15, 522.
Blunt, John James (1794–1855), graduated B.A. and was elected Fellow of St John's College, Camridge, in 1816. Appointed a Wort's Travelling Bachelor in 1818, he travelled a good deal in Italy and Sicily and in 1823 published Vestiges of Ancient Manners and Customs in Modern Italy and Sicily. He became a contributor to the Quarterly Review, published several works of divinity, and in 1839 was elected Lady Margaret Professor of Divinity at Cambridge. Lectures on the pastoral ministry delivered in the 1840s and 1850s made a great impression and were published as The Parish Priest: His Acquirements, Principal Obligations and Duties. Offered the Bishopric of Salisbury in 1854, he turned it down on grounds of age. (DM), 276.
Bohn (VII), James Stuart Burges (1803–80), 13, 16, 20, 219, 223.
Bonquéau, Abbé, Tutor in the Archbishop's College at Malines, 279.
Bosanquet (VII), Samuel Richard (1800–82), 184, 422, 445.
Bosworth, Joseph (1789–1876), was educated at Repton Grammar School and then at the University of Aberdeen, where he gained M.A. and LL.D. degrees. He then entered Trinity College, Cambridge, B.D. 1834, D.D. 1839, and in 1847 was admitted ad eundem at Oxford, being incorporated at Christ Church ten years later. He was Rawlinsonian Professor of Anglo-Saxon at Oxford from 1858–76, and in 1867 made over the sum of £10,000 to Cambridge for the foundation of an Anglo-Saxon Professorship after his death. Among his various publications was The Elements of Anglo-Saxon Grammar (1823), which was the earliest English work of its kind. He hailed from Derbyshire and was a friend of Samuel Fox (q.v.). (DNB), 369, 371.
Bowden, Charles (1836–1906), younger son of J. W. Bowden and a godson of Newman. He became a Catholic with his mother and two sisters in 1846, though had shown a strong attraction to Catholicism from an early age. He eventually joined the London Oratory, where the rest of his life was spent, 475.
Bowden (VI), Henry (1804–69), 43–4, 210, 223–4;
Mrs H. Bowden, 381, family, 210.
Bowden, Mrs Henry, Marianne Catherine Burgoyne (1806–64), younger daughter of Major General Sir Montague Roger Burgoyne, was the second wife of Henry Bowden, married by Newman at St George's, Hanover Square, in 1838. She was received into the Catholic Church in 1852, shortly after her husband, 381.
Bowden, Mrs John William (1805–96), Elizabeth, youngest daughter of Sir John Swinburne, sixth Baronet. The poet was her nephew. In 1828 she married Newman's greatest friend from his early Oxford days. She became a Catholic in 1846, followed by several of her children. She lived to attend Newman's funeral, 64–5, 509.
Bowen and Sandford, Stationers of 315, Oxford Street, with whom Newman did a good deal of business at this time, 117, 128, 155, 161.
Bovell, John William, from Barbados, where his father was a doctor, matriculated from Oriel on 18 March 1830, aged 18. Newman was his tutor in mathematics and divinity for four terms, 497.
Bowdler, probably Thomas, the younger (1782–1856), was at St John's College, Cambridge, graduating B.A. in 1803, M.A. 1806. He held the livings of Ash and Ridley, and Addington, Kent, and in 1834 became incumbent of Sydenham. In 1849 he was made a Prebendary of St Paul's Cathedral. DNB describes him as an opponent of the Tractarians, but his 1841 pamphlet, Quid Romae Faciam? No Need to join the Romish Communion on Account of the Want of Discipline in the Church of England, displays a marked degree of sympathy. He published a large number of sermons, and was the editor of the Gibbon edition which had been prepared by his famous uncle and namesake, 302.
Bowstead (VII), James, 277, 390, 496.
Bowyer (VI), George (1811–83), 32, 164–5, 184, 223, 226, 230, 232, 257, 265–6, 272, 275–6, 280, 295, 298, 311–12, 343–4, 357, 362, 368, 381, 416, 419, 442, 446, 477, 509.
Bramston (VI), John (1802–9), 24, 273, 277, 465, 474–6;
Mrs J. Bramston, 475–6.
Brancker, Thomas, entered Wadham College in 1830, aged 17, B.A. 1834, M.A. 1837. Fellow of the College from 1835–50, during which time he held the offices of Bursar, Tutor and Divinity Lecturer. Brancker was one of those who were invited to subscribe to the Tutors' Letter of Protest against Tract 90 but declined. In 1849 he was appointed to the College living of Limmington, Somerset. He died in 1871, 59.
Brewer (VI), John Sherren (1810–79), 93, 113, 197, 288, 401.
Bridges (VII), Brooke Charles, 4, 23, 240, 285.
Bridges (VII), Brook Edward, 253.
Bridges, George, 'College Servant', and parishioner of St Mary's, 255.
Bridgwater (VII), A., 9.
Broadist, for Broadhurst, parishioner of St Mary's, 255.
Bromfield, probably Henry, eldest son of Thomas Ross Bromfield (B.A. from Trinity College in 1789), entered Wadham College in 1819, aged 18, graduated B.A. in 1823. He took orders and became curate at Wasperton, Warks. From 1855–78 he was Vicar of Blockley, Worcs., and in 1858 was appointed Rural Dean. He died in 1880, 258, 261, 266, 278.
Brougham, Henry Peter, Baron Brougham and Vaux (1778–1868), was a prolific contributor to the Edinburgh Review, and practised at the English Bar. He became a Member of the House of Commons in 1810, Lord Chancellor in 1830, and again in 1835, and was a protagonist in the events leading to the Great Reform Act of 1832. However, his more radical sentiments made him increasingly unpopular with his former Whig friends and allies and he spent his last years at Cannes in retirement. (DNB), 108, 111. (See also under 'Newman' at 'Letters of Catholicus' passim).
Browne, Hablot Knight (1815–82), distinguished artist and caricaturist, who rose to fame as 'Phiz'. His illustrations for Pickwick in 1837 were his first major success, and from then on his popularity increased, both with his work for Dickens, and for other authors' publications. (DNB), 111.
Browne (VII), Robert William (1809–95), 372, 401.
Browell (VI), William Robert (1805 or 6–67), 205, 250, 356.
Bruce, Horace Lewis Knight (1813 or 14–48), matriculated from Christ Church in 1831, and graduated B.A. in 1835. He entered Lincoln's Inn and, having with his father assumed the additional surname of Bruce, was called to the Bar in 1838. He took orders and was Vicar of Abbot-sham, Devon, from 1844 until his early death in 1848, 93, 298, 304, 312, 470, 474.
Bryant, Mrs, parishioner of St Mary's, 191.
Buckland (VII), William (1784–1856), 105.
Buckle (VII), George (1820–1900), 394.
Budge (VII), Edward (1800–65), 24, 219.
Buller (VI), Anthony (1809–81), 354, 396.
Bulteel, Henry Bellenden (1800–66), entered Brasenose College in 1818, and was elected to a Fellowship of Exeter College. His marriage to Eleanor Sadler, daughter of a pastrycook in the High Street, meant the resignation of his Fellowship and acceptance of the curacy of St Ebbe's. His extreme Evangelical preaching and attacks on the state of University and Church led to the Bishop of Oxford suspending him. Friends built him a Chapel behind Pembroke College, where his ministry resembled that of the Plymouth Brethren, and where he claimed to have worked miracles by prayer. His followers were known as Bulteelers or Bulteelites. (DNB), 384.
Bunsen (VI), Christian Charles Josias, Baron von, (1791–1860), 246, 286–7, 289–91, 306, 325, 330–1, 337, 362, 371, 409.
Burford, Miss Sarah, owner of the Littlemore cottages which Newman leased from 1841–6, 219–20, 384, 508.
Burger, Lewis, Esq., of 9, Well Court, Union Street, Cheapside. Burger and his family were friends of Miss M. R. Giberne, 288, 298, 455, 470;
Mrs Burger, 298.
pg 617Burgon, John William (1813–88), entered Worcester College in 1841, after working for ten years in the office of his father Thomas (q.v. Volume VII), a London based Turkey merchant. Burgon won the Newdigate Prize in 1845, and was a Fellow of Oriel from 1846–76. Oriel appointed him Vicar of St Mary's in 1863, and in 1876 he became Dean of Chichester. He was a very conservative High Churchman, renowned for his defence of lost causes. His Lives of Twelve Good Men, two volumes, London 1888, consisted of biographies of nineteenth century High Churchmen. (DNB), 302, 397.
Burke, Dr, 434, 452.
Burns (VII), James (1808–71), 290.
Burridge, Mr, 376;
Burridge, Mrs, 376–7.
Burrows (VII), parishioner at Littlemore, 28.
Burton (VII), Edward (1794–1836), 377.
Bush, Messrs, 354,
Campbell, Mr, 510.
Canterbury, Archbishop of, see Howley, William.
Capes (VII), John Moore (1812–89), 435.
Caswall, Henry (1810–70), was educated at Chigwell Grammar School, travelled to America and studied at Kenyon College, Ohio. He was ordained Deacon by the Bishop of Ohio in 1831, becoming the College's first ordained graduate. He was the author of America and the American Church, 1839, which was the subject of a Brit. Crit. review by Newman, and of studies of Joseph Smith and Mormonism. In 1843 he returned to England, and was Vicar of Figheldean, Wilts., 1848–70, and from 1860 a Prebendary of Salisbury. (Boase I), 235, 238.
Champernowne (VI), probably Richard, entered Christ Church in 1835, aged 18, B.A. 1839, M.A. 1842. He succeeded Archdeacon Froude as Rector of Dartington, Devon, in 1859, and was Rural Dean from 1859–64, 196, 238, 249, 261, 278–9;
Arthur, 507;
Caroline, 507.
Chandler (VI), George (1780–1859), 36, 44–5, 445–6.
Chanter (VI), John Mill, 197, 206, 209.
Charrington (VII), Nicholas George, 203.
Charteris, Francis (1818–1914), educated at Christ Church, B.A. 1841, and was M.P. for East Gloucestershire from 1841–46, and for Haddingtonshire from 1847 until he succeeded as 10th Earl of Wemyss and Viscount Elcho in 1882. He was a Liberal Conservative, and voted for Lord Derby's 1859 Reform Bill and against that of Lord John Russell of 1866, 217.
Chase (VII), Drummond Percy (1820–1902), 203, 276, 496, 498.
Chase, John Woodford, father of the preceding and following, 512.
Chase (VII), Temple Hamilton, 202, 512.
Chester, Bishop of, see Sumner, John Bird.
Choules, Oriel servant during all of Newman's years there until his death at the end of 1840. Newman then helped to pay his widow's rent and gave her sundry other assistance, 7.
Chretien, Charles Peter (1820–93), was educated at King's College School, London, where he was head boy, and Brasenose College, B.A. 1841. In 1843 he was elected to an Oriel Fellowship, and was to be a leading figure in College life for the next nineteen years, holding the office of Tutor from 1848–60, and of Dean from 1850–9. From 1860–75, he was incumbent of the College living of Cholderton, Wilts., which had earlier been held by T. Mozley. He was the author of An Essay on Logical Method (1848), and Six Sermons on the Inspiration of Holy Scripture (1861). (Boase IV), 496.
Christie (VI), Albany James (1817–91), 25, 154, 170–1, 179, 251, 278, 394, 430, 496, 501.
Christie (VI), John Frederic (1808–60), 48, 51, 117–18, 171, 191–2, 196, 199, 231, 250, 258, 280–1, 298, 439, 448, 455, 496.
Church (VI), Richard William (1815–90), 3, 4, 7, 9–10, 21, 24, 27–9, 34, 37, 61, 64–7, 72, 76, 97–8, 107–11, 129, 152, 154, 170–1, 176–9, 183, 186, 191, 199, 201, 205–11, 215–16, 219, 221, 224, 230–2, 238, 240, 246, 249–53, 255, 258, 266–8, 273, 275–6, 285, 297–8, 304, 351, 383–9, 395–7, 442, 462, 464, 471–4, 489, 493, 496, 498–9,
Churton (VI), Edward (1800–74), 13, 15–17, 19, 36, 38, 45, 52–4, 114–15, 164, 276, 373, 405, 444, 521.
Churton (VI), Thomas Townson, 59–61, 109, 115–16, 156.
Clancy, William, Bishop of Oriense and Vicar Apostolic of British Guiana, apparently retired in 1843, 241.
Clark, there were three families of this name at Littlemore, 28, 44, 54, 63–4, 223.
Clarke (VII), Henry (1804–80), 147, 152, 276, 510.
Claughton (VI), Piers Calverley (1814–84), 326.
Claughton (VII), Thomas Legh (1808–92), 10, 15, 326, 350, 352, 358, 371–2.
Clerk, for Clark.
Clerke (VI), Charles Carr (1798–1877), 125–7, 130, 146.
Clifford, John Bryant (1804–86), entered St Catherine's College, Cambridge in 1828, B.A. 1832, M.A. 1836. Ordained deacon in 1831, he worked as curate for three years in Southampton, and then for a further two at Petersfield, Hants. Curate of St Matthew's, Kingsdown, Bristol, from 1836–7, he was then appointed Perpetual Curate and remained until 1879, 321, 325.
Close (VII), Francis (1797–1882), 11.
Clough (VII), Arthur Hugh (1819–61), 222, 496, 498.
Coates, John, was Master of Almondbury Grammar School, and Perpetual Curate of St Mark's, Longwood, Huddersfield, from 1822 until his death at the age of 57 in April 1847, 198_9.
Cockey (VII), Edward, 59.
Codrington, Christopher William (1805–64), Conservative M.P. for East Gloucestershire from 1834 until death. Codrington voted in favour of the Maynooth Inquiry in 1853. (Boase I), 217.
pg 618Coffin (VI), Robert Aston (1819–85), 4, 21, 28, 113, 196, 210, 219, 276, 279, 429–30.
Coghlan, T. Lloyd, Rector of Mourne Abbey, Co. Cork, became a Catholic in 1851, Following the death of his wife, he trained for the priesthood, and was ordained for the Diocese of Cork in 1871, 209, 216, 219, 223–4.
Coleridge (VII), Edward (1800–83), 155, 167–9, 171, 305, 310–11.
Coleridge, John Duke (1820–94), elder son of Sir John Taylor, was educated at Eton and at Balliol College, where he was a friend of A. H. Clough and Matthew Arnold. He was a Fellow of Exeter College from 1843 until 1846, when he was called to the Bar. He contributed to the Guardian and the Quarterly and Edinburgh reviews. He sat as Liberal M. P. for Exeter from 1865 until his appointment as Lord Chief Justice in 1873. He was counsel in the Tichborne Case, 1871–2. In 1874 he was created Baron Coleridge. He had made Newman's acquaintance when at Oxford, and, after the Apologia became a good friend and admirer, confessing that Newman, 'interests and awes me like no other man I ever saw. He is as simple and humble and playful as a child, and, yet, I am with a being unlike any one else.' (Life and Correspondence of Lord Coleridge, London 1904, II, 314). (DNB), 60, 126.
Coleridge (VI), Sir John Taylor (1790–1876), 149, 280, 317, 352.
Coleridge, William Hart (1789–1849), nephew of the poet, was a Student of Christ Church from 1808 until 1824, when he went out to Barbados as Bishop. He returned to England in 1841 and was appointed Warden of St Augustine's Missionary College, Canterbury. (DNB), 409.
Collis (VII), John Day (1816–79), 178, 208, 225–6, 419.
Collison, Frederick William Portlock (1814–89), entered St John's College, Cambridge in 1832, B.A. 1836, won the Tyrwhitt Hebrew Scholarship in 1837, and was a Fellow from 1838–55. Collison was one of the founder members of the Cambridge Camden Society in 1839, contributed to The Ecclesiologist, and was Treasurer from 1839–44. A particular interest of his was the theology and significance of the Christian altar, about which he published several pieces. (Boase IV), 266, 271.
Colquhoun (VI), William Laurence, 512.
Combe (VI), Thomas (1797–1872), 490.
Combe (VII), Mrs Thomas, nee Martha Edwards, 35.
Conybeare (VII), William Daniel (1787–1857), 429.
Cooper (VII), Anthony Ashley, seventh Earl of Shaftesbury (1801–85), 10, 324, 358, 371, 400, 416.
Copeland, George Ford (1810–73), brother of William John, practised as a doctor at Cheltenham, and M. R. Giberne and Selina Bacchus (qq.v.) were among his patients. In 1846 he married Miss Bacchus and, in 1855, followed her into the Catholic Church, 235, 502.
Copeland (VI), William John (1804–85), 4, 6, 10, 13–14, 16, 18–19, 21, 24–5, 52, 54, 61, 76, 117, 124, 158, 170–1, 177, 184, 191, 203–4, 209, 226, 230, 232, 235, 238, 251, 255, 261, 272, 276, 278, 285, 302, 304, 336, 389, 390–6, 400, 404, 413, 415, 418, 430, 435, 455, 460, 463, 465, 471, 473, 489, 493, 499, 502, 506, 508, 510, 512;
William Copeland, senior, 235;
Mary Copeland, 276, 415, 463.
Copleston (VII), Edward (1776–1849), 413.
Copleston (VI), William James, 161.
Corbett, Stuart, entered Merton College in 1792, aged 18, and graduated B.A. 1796, M.A. 1800, B.D. and D.D. 1816. He received the living on Scrayingham, Yorks., in 1816 and in 1837 was appointed Archdeacon of York. He died in 1845, 114–15.
Corderay, or Cawdery, probably Elizabeth, wife of James of Littlemore parish, though there was another family of a similar surname living there, 471.
Cornish (VI), Charles Lewis (1809–70), 10, 15, 24, 27, 34, 45, 64–6, 154, 192, 217, 219, 304, 351, 455.
Cornish (VI), Hubert Kestell, 21, 192, 278.
Cornish (VII), Thomas Brooking, 170–1, 208–9, 219, 230, 397–8, 496.
Costar, Richard, ran coach services from Oxford to various destinations around the country for many years. Costar was, 'as great an original as any of his men;
those who on his weekly visits to the Bensington stables sat behind Black Will and his master and overheard their talk, listened, with amusement or disgust, to a rampant paraphrase of Lucretius' Fourth Book. He lived in the picturesque house on the Cherwell, just opposite Magdalen Turnpike, having two entrance gates, one on each side of the pike, so that he could always elude payment.' (W. Tuckwell, Reminiscences of Oxford, London, 1900, pp. 4–5), 220, 418, 503.
Cotton (VI), William Charles (1813–79), 184, 253, 271–2.
Courtenay (VI), Charles Leslie, 208, 246, 255, 394.
Cox, George Valentine (1786–1875), educated at Magdalen College School and New College, B.A. 1806, he was Master of New College School from 1806–57. Cox was Esquire Bedel in Law from 1806–66, and was also appointed University Coroner in 1808. Author of Recollections of Oxford (1868), he also published translations of some German classical and patristic works. (DNB), 362;
Frances Elizabeth, daughter, 362, 380, 445.
Coxwell, Miss, 91.
Cramer (VI), John Anthony (1793–1848), 105.
Crank, Mr, 223–4, 226, 232, 235.
Crowder, Sir Richard Budden (1795–1859), educated at Eton and Trinity College, Cambridge, called to the bar at Lincoln's Inn in 1821 and went on the Western Circuit, Q.C. 1837. He was Recorder of Bristol from 1846–54, and Justice of the Court of Common Pleas from 1854 until death. (DNB), 231.
Crowdy, Anthony, entered Brasenose College in 1820, aged 17, B.A. 1823, M.A. 1826. He took pg 619orders and held various livings in the Diocese of Winchester, including Winnall, Hants., from 1841–52, and Titsey, Surrey, from 1861–78, 227, 258, 273, 286.
Crawley (VII), Charles (1788–1871), 10, 16–19, 21, 25, 51–4, 183–4, 193, 202–3, 208–9, 276, 396, 400, 404, 427.
Cripps, probably William, entered Trinity College in 1822, aged 17, was elected Vinerian Scholar in 1825, and graduated B.A. in 1826. Barrister at the Inner Temple in 1829, he married a sister of Benjamin Harrison. He sat in Parliament from 1841–48 as M.P. for the Cirencester seat which his father had held for the previous 24 years. Although in favour of Free Trade, he sat as a Conservative, 350.
Crosthwaite (VI), John Clarke (1800 or 1–74), 24.
Dalgairns (VII), John Dobree (1818–76), 25, 66, 177, 190, 215, 219, 223, 235, 237, 246, 255, 257, 266, 271–2, 275–6, 278–81, 307, 313, 339, 361, 385, 394, 413, 416, 419, 421–2, 424, 435, 469, 488, 492, 494, 498, 501, 507–8, 510, 513, 515, 563–7.
Dalton, J., of Derbyshire, 154, 168, 358, 361.
Daman (VII), Charles, 3, 8, 66, 129, 192, 198, 211, 249, 471, 500.
Darling, James (1797–1862), having been apprenticed to the publisher Adam Black, he set up a bookselling business in 1825 at 22, Little Queen Street, Lincoln's Inn Fields. In 1840 he started the Clerical Library for the use of theological students, later renamed the Metropolitan Library. (Boase I), 25, 27–8.
Darwin, Robert Alvey, only son of William Brown Darwin (1791–1841), entered Exeter College in May 1845, aged 19, but left Oxford without taking a degree. Following the death of his father he succeeded to Elston Hall, Notts., which, having been the family home of Erasmus Darwin (grandfather of Charles), suggests that he was a distant relative of the biologist, 224, 227, 229, 235, 271.
Davy, Jane, Lady (1780–1855), married Sir Humphry Davy in 1807, after the death of her first husband. She was a leading socialite in both London and Rome, and her company was highly esteemed by Madame de Staël. (DNB), 9.
Day (VII), Joseph, 253.
Dayman (VII), Edward Arthur (1807–90), 67, 92, 109.
Dealtry, William (1775–1847), was educated at St Catherine's Hall and Trinity College, Cambridge, and was a Fellow of the latter from 1798–1814. For some years Professor of Mathematics at Haileybury College, on the foundation of which he sat, he published the student's manual The Principles of Fluxions in 1810. Dealtry was a fervent Evangelical and succeeded John Venn as Rector of Clapham in 1813. Prebendary of Winchester in 1830, he was appointed Archdeacon of Sussex in 1845. (DNB), 178, 277.
Dean (VII), George, 44, 48, 55, 257, 487.
Dear (VI), William Smith, 45, 177, 179–80, 197, 201, 238, 431, 464.
Deighton, J. and J., booksellers at Cambridge, 198, 386, 391, 396, 429.
Delany or Delaney for Belaney, R.
Demainbray (VI), Francis (1795?–1846), 168–70.
Dendy, Samuel, entered Trinity College in 1832, aged 18, B.A. 1836, M.A. 1839. He took orders, held various curacies and livings, and in 1869 was appointed Rector of Pensthorpe, Norfolk, 350.
Denison (VI), Edward (1801–54), 221, 333, 348, 409, 587–92;
Mrs E. Denison (nee Louisa Mary Seymer), 276.
Denison (VI), George (1805–96), 267, 357, 418, 429, 438.
Dewhurst, Mr, 129.
Dickins or Dickens (VI), Minerva, 107, 128–9;
John Dickins, 128–9;
Frederick Owen Dickins, 128.
Digby, Kenelm Henry (1800–80), was the youngest son of William, Dean of Clonfert, went up to Trinity College, Cambridge, B.A. 1819, and while there developed a keen interest in medieval antiquities. He became a Catholic around 1823. A. L. Phillipps became a friend on going up to Trinity, already a Catholic, in 1826. He was the author of The Broadstone of Honour (1822) and Mores Catholici (1831–40). (DNB), 447.
Dixon, Mr, 113, 146, 152.
Doane (VII), George Washington (1799–1859), 37, 217, 225–6, 240, 249.
Dodgson (VII), Charles (1800–68), 236.
Dodsworth (VI), William (1798–1861), 37, 122, 288–9, 391–2, 394, 396, 405–6, 410, 419, 424, 426, 442, 448, 452, 454, 465, 484–8, 490, 499.
Dollinger, Johann Joseph Ignaz von (1799–1890), the church historian at Munich, who was friendly with Wiseman and Hope and took a keen interest in English affairs. Newman visited him when returning from Rome in Dec. 1847, and six years later put his name forward as an extraordinary Professor for the Catholic University of Ireland. He refused to accept the definition of Papal Infallibility in 1870, 197.
Dolman, Charles, (1807–83), Catholic publisher and bookseller, at 61, New Bond Street, from 1840. He took over publication of The Catholic Magazine in 1838, and, in March 1845, started Dolman's Magazine, which lasted until Aug. 1849. He published important but expensive editions of Catholic works by Lingard, Rock and Digby, which proved unprofitable and led to his retirement to Paris around 1858. Newman purchased books from him at this time but, in 1848, was to be drawn into a sharp controversy when Dolman's Magazine published a violent attack on F. W. Faber's Oratorian series of Lives of the Saints. (DNB), 477, 479, 481, 485.
Dornford (VI), Joseph (1794–1868), 189, 203, 206, 307, 343, 349, 395, 429.
Dover (VII), Thomas, parishioner at Littlemore, 18, 51, 54.
pg 620Dowling (VII), John Goulter (1805–41), 19, 521.
Dowding (VII), William, 14, 23–4.
Doyle (VII), Sir Francis Henry (1810–88), 209.
Doyle, Thomas (1793–1879), educated at St Edmund's College, Ware, went to St George's, then the Royal Belgian Chapel in Southwark, in 1820, becoming senior priest there nine years later. He built, with Pugin as architect, St George's Cathedral, Southwark, which was solemnly opened in July 1848. In 1850 he became the first Provost of the Southwark Chapter. He contributed frequently to the Tablet as 'Father Thomas,' in his own peculiar strain of humour. (DNB), 128–9, 176, 183.
Dressel, A. R. M., patristic scholar, editor of Prudentius who in 1853 recovered the lost text of the Clementine Homilies, which he included in his 1857 Leipzig edition of the Patrum Apostolicorum Opera, 40.
Drury, Henry (1812–63), was educated at Harrow and Caius College, Cambridge, where he was Browne medallist in 1833 and 1835, Classical Lecturer from 1838–9, M.A. 1840. He devised a collection of translations into Latin and Greek verse by various Cambridge men, which was published in 1841 as Arundines Cami. He was appointed Prebendary of Salisbury in 1855, Chaplain to the House of Commons in 1857, and Archdeacon of Wiltshire in 1862. (DNB), 280.
Duke, Mr, probably William (1805?–64), entered Magdalen Hall in 1826, B.A. 1829, B.M, 1833, D.M. 1836. He became a prominent St Leonard's doctor. In 1846 he and his wife and eight children became Catholics. He later became a great opponent of Mother Cornelia Connelly, particularly over the granting of some property at St Leonards to her and her order, 215–16.
Dukes, Robert Middleton, matriculated from Merton College, at the age of 18, in June 1834, graduated B.A. 1838, M.A. 1841, and took orders. He gained a Michel Fellowship at Queen's College in 1842, which he held until his early death in the summer of 1843, 21, 24, 223, 396, 491.
Dyce (VII), William (1806–64), 14, 31, 229–30, 235, 258, 266, 302, 304, 425.
Dyer, George, 353.
Dyer (VI), James Hardwicke, 48.
Dyer, Mr, 255.
Dyson (VI), Charles (1788–1860), 412.
Dyson, Francis (1785 or 6–1858), brother of Charles (q.v.), entered Merton College in 1802, B.A. 1806, M.A. 1809, and was a Fellow of the College until 1817. In the previous year he had been appointed to the living of South Tedworth, Hants., and in 1829 he added that of North Tedworth, and held on to both livings for life. Appointed Chaplain in Ordinary to the Sovereign in 1819, he also became a Prebendary of Salisbury in 1847. (Boase I), 216.
Dyson (VII), Mary Anne or Marianne, 3, 46, 412.
Eccleston, Mr, 36, 70, 93.
Eden (VI), Charles Page (1807–85), 7, 13, 20, 21, 59, 67, 109, 240, 249, 255, 281–2, 285, 452, 500.
Edgar, Mrs Austin, of Kreithood, N.B., became a Catholic along with her daughters, 300.
Edwards (VI), Andrew, 111.
Edwards, possibly Edward James Justinian (1811–84), educated at Shrewsbury School and Balliol College, B.A. 1835, won the Kennicott Hebrew Scholarship in the same year. Ordained deacon in 1836, priest in 1838, went to work as curate at Trentham, Staffs., where he became Perpetual Curate in 1841. Appointed Prebendary of Lichfield Cathedral in 1859, he edited the Diocesan Calendar from 1856 until his death and was the editor and part compiler of The Annals of the Diocese of Lichfield (1859–63). (Boase V), 255.
Ellacombe (VII), Henry Thomas (1790–1885), 6.
Ellison (VII), Noel Thomas, 161, 298, 319, 394, 436.
Elrington, Charles Richard (1787–1850), graduated B.A. from Trinity College, Dublin, in 1805, was Mathematical and Hebrew Prizeman, Fellow from 1810–29, and was Donnellan Lecturer in 1819. From 1829–50 he was Regius Professor of Divinity at Dublin. Chancellor of Ferns from 1832–40, he was appointed Rector of the Union of Armagh in 1841. He began publication of the complete Works of Archbishop Ussher in 1847. (DNB), 268.
Elwes, Henry, originally ordained for the Catholic Eastern District, based at Northampton, worked at Dudley from 1838–40, and from 1841–2 was Professor of French at Oscott College. In 1852 he transferred to the Diocese of Plymouth, where he remained until his death in 1878, 183.
Erving, Mr, 334.
Esmonde, Bartholomew (1789–1862), entered the Society of Jesus in 1807, and studied at Stonyhurst and Palermo. He worked in Rome for a while, was also Rector of Clongowes College, and went as a missioner to Malta from 1848–50. His help was sought at the time of the Achilli Trial. A literary man and author of a few books, he was also renowned for his amiable nature, 12.
Esson, George of 56, George Street, Edinburgh. Seems to have been an accountant by profession, 272–3.
Estcourt, Thomas Henry Sutton Sotheron (1801–76), entered Oriel in 1818, B.A. 1823, M.A. 1826. A Liberal-Conservative, he was M.P. for Marlborough 1829–32, for Devizes from 1835–44, when he was chosen for the North Wiltshire seat that he was to hold until 1865. Appointed to the Privy Council in 1858, he was President of the Poor Law Board from Mar. 1858 to Mar. 1859, and Home Secretary from then until June 1859. On the death of his father in law in 1839, he assumed the name and arms of Sotheron, but in 1855 resumed, by royal licence, the name of Estcourt. (DNB), 352.
Evans (VI), Herbert Norman, M.D. (1802–77), 16, 18.
Evans, Lewis, entered Wadham College in 1832, aged 17, B.A. 1836, and was a Fellow of the pg 621College from 1839–46. Evans was Head Master of Sandbach Free Grammar School from 1850 until his death in 1869. He edited Marshall's Penitential Disciple for the Library of Anglo-Catholic Theology, and also Bishop Beveridge's Sermons in 8 volumes. (Boase I), 208.
Ewens, probably for Ewing, Alexander.
Ewing, possibly Alexander (1814–79), educated at Chelsea, and then Edinburgh University, he was the episcopalian priest at Forres from 1841–7, and then Bishop of Argyll and the Islands from 1847–79. He was also Provost of the Tractarian College, which had been founded next to the Collegiate Church at Cumbrae, from 1854–66. (Boase I), 357, 369.
Exeter, Bishop of, see Phillpotts, Henry.
Exeter College, Rector of, see Richards, Joseph Loscombe.
Eyre (VI), Daniel James, 350, 356, 377, 396, 502.
Faber (VI), Frederick William (1814–63), 35, 150, 209, 460, 462–3, 471.
Faussett (VI), Godfrey (1780 or 1–1853), 41, 200–2, 204, 209, 217–19, 222–3, 228, 231, 236, 250, 253, 276, 281, 365, 515.
Feather, Mr, 128.
Ffoulkes, Edmund Salusbury (1819–94), was at Shrewsbury School, and then at Jesus College, where he was elected to a Fellowship in 1842. He succeeded David Lewis as Vice-Principal in 1846. Received into the Catholic Church in 1855, he returned to the Church of England in 1870, and was Vicar of St Mary's from 1878, (he published an extremely well documented and valuable History of the Church in 1892). In 1853, he had published a 'Counter Theory' to Dev. As a Catholic, he contributed to the Union Review, and sought to open a hall for Catholics at Oxford. (Boase V), 276.
Finch, Mr, 183.
Fisher, Mr, 220.
Follett (VII), Sir William Webb (1798–1845), 35–6, 456.
Forbes (VII), Alexander Penrose (1817–75), 38, 196, 301, 310, 368, 457.
Formby, Henry (1816–84), after being at Charter-house School, went up to Brasenose College in 1834 as a Scholar, and came under the influence of Newman and the Oxford Movement. He was Vicar of Ruardean in the Diocese of Gloucester, and he resigned the living in 1845. He then travelled in Belgium for a while before being received into the Catholic Church in Jan. 1846 at Oscott College. There he remained until ordination in Sept. 1847. He tried his vocation with Newman and the Oratorians for a short while in 1848. The rest of his active life was spent as a priest in Birmingham, Wednesbury and Leics. He had a prolific literary output and the chief of his enthusiasms, which was pursued to an almost eccentric degree, was Plain Chant. (Boase I), 285, 288, 295, 316, 319, 344, 355, 375, 377, 386, 419,512.
Formby, Miss, of 'Lytham, Preston, Lancashire', 158–9, 167.
Fortescue (VII), Edward Bowles Knottesford (1816–77), 191.
Fourdrinier, Anna Maria (1807–75), first cousin to Newman, being the third daughter of his uncle Charles. She and her sister Eliza were great friends of Newman's sisters, who often stayed with them, especially when younger. Anne Maria never married and remained at home with her mother and sister, 33.
Fourdrinier, Charles (1768–1841), Newman's uncle, the second oldest of his mother's four brothers, 33, 35.
Fourdrinier, Mrs Charles (married in 1795, died in 1850), nee Mary Jenkin, daughter of General John Jenkin of Waterford. She and Newman's mother had been good friends, and she was known as a lively and sociable character. Newman last saw his aunt on 30 July 1844, when he visited the family in anticipation of his probable conversion and the estrangement it would cause, 28, 33, 35, 157.
Fourdrinier, Eliza (1812–?), youngest daughter of Newman's uncle Charles. She never married and remained at home with her mother and sister Anna Maria until their respective deaths, after which she went to live with her brother John Coles, 'somewhere near Forest Hill', at least until his death in 1882. It was around this time that Newman made tentative (and unsuccessful) plans to visit her. She outlived all the members of her immediate family and appears to have died after Newman, 33.
Fourdrinier, Henry (1766–1854), oldest brother of Newman's mother, succeeded to his father's wealthy paper manufacturing and stationery business. Together with his brother Sealy, he developed a paper making machine, patenting a first model in 1801, and six years later perfected a more ambitious model which allowed for the production of continuous paper. The huge cost involved in developing their system (c. £60,000), together with the defective state of the Law of Patents at the time, led to acute crisis, which was only exacerbated by the Russian government reneging on payment for machines which had been ordered by the Tsar Alexander while in England in 1814. However, the paper trade raised some support, and, in 1840, Parliament granted them £7,000 on account of the troublesome legal deficiency regarding Patents. Henry died at Burston Hall in Staffordshire and is buried at Stone. (DNB), 302.
Fourdrinier, Joseph (c.1797–1862), eldest son of Henry Fourdrinier (see above), married Sophia Brooks. They had five children, though at least two of these died in infancy. He died in Oct. 1862, after being knocked down by a van in King William Street, Strand, 302.
Fourdrinier, Sarah Anne, daughter of George Walker, married Henry, Newman's mother's pg 622eldest brother in 1790. She died in 1841, and was buried at Stone, Staffs., 302.
Foss, see Payne and Foss.
Fox, possibly John, entered Queen's College in 1823, aged 16, B.A. 1827. He was for some years Headmaster of St Bee's Grammar School, and was Perpetual Curate of Hale, Cumberland, from 1844 until his death in 1859, 4.
Fox (VII), Samuel (1801–71), 184, 369.
Francis, Mr, 470.
Fraser (VII), James (1818–85), 170–1, 496, 500.
Fraser, Mr, 235.
Frederick William IV (1795–1861), King of Prussia, succeeded to the throne in 1840, with a reputation for liberal sympathies and a keen interest in religious affairs. The 1848 revolutions shook his confidence and the remainder of his reign was marked by irresolution. During the last three years of his life he was afflicted by paralysis and partial insanity and the administration was managed by Prince William, afterwards German Emperor, 289, 290–1, 417, 443, 445–6, 448, 472.
Freeman, Mr, 452, 455.
French, Daniel (1774–1846), a Catholic lawyer, apparently somewhat officious. He thought well of Newman and the Tractarians, and, on 20 Oct. 1845, spoke of his 'heartfelt joy at finding Mr Newman converted.' He wrote poetry in the Tablet, and A Catholic Tract . . . in Answer to a Protestant One . . ., 1840, 240, 246, 356–7, 480, 488–9.
Froude (VI), James Anthony (1818–94), 442, 493, 501.
Froude, John Spedding (1806 or 7–41), third son of Archdeacon Froude. John became a lawyer and succeeded to a considerable business, but he hated and neglected it. He was a friend of Landseer's. He gave his time and mind to art, and might have distinguished himself had he made art his profession . . .' (W. H. Dunn, J. A. Froude: A Biography, Oxford 1961, I, 17), 20, 24.
Froude (VI), Richard Hurrell (1803–36), 5, 58, 117, 150, 155, 171, 196, 201, 277, 361, 385, 394–5. 450. (See also at 'Newman' under 'Remains')
Froude (VI), Robert Hurrell (1770–1859), 24, 273–4.
Froude (VI), William (1810–79), 20, 24, 146, 200, 278, 319–20, 338, 455, 458, 512–13.
Froude (VI under Holdsworth), Mrs William (1809 or 10–78), 24, 123, 129, 146–7, 154, 191, 195, 199.
Fry, Elizabeth (1780–1845), Quaker philanthropist, who first started to visit the female prisoners at Newgate in 1813, and went on to spend the rest of her life working for the reform of prisons, and also of the hospital system and the treatment of the insane. (DNB), 448.
Fulford (VI), Francis (1803–68), 438.
Garbett (VI), James (1802–79), 186, 246, 291, 308, 311–12, 332, 341–2, 344, 350, 352–4, 358, 371, 400, 417, 426, 428, 449, 476.
Garrett or Garratt, Mr, 151, 161.
Garvey, Richard, of 'Vicar's Court, Lincoln', Headmaster of Lincoln Grammar School, Vicar Choral, and holder of several livings, 188, 471, 473–4.
Gibbings (VI), Richard (1813–88), 288, 290, 361, 371.
Gibbons or Gibbins, Mr, probably George Buckmaster, late Scholar of St John's College, Cambridge, Perpetual Curate of St Mary Magdalene, Launceston, Cornwall. Gibbons spoke favourably of Tractarianism in an 1839 Sermon which he preached before Bishop Phillpotts during a triennial visitation, 199, 206, 235.
Giberne (VI), Maria Rosina (1802–85), 20, 27, 35, 44–5, 54, 56,117–18, 128, 147–8, 154, 189–90, 194, 206–7, 209–10, 212, 216, 279, 298–9, 334–5, 386, 391–3, 455–6, 476–7, 486, 496–7, 502–3, 512.
Gilbert and Rivington, see Rivington, Francis.
Gilbert (VI), Ashurst Turner (1786–1870), 281, 332, 342–3, 350–2, 371, 409–11, 417–18, 422, 429, 437, 465.
Gilbert, Elizabeth Margaretta Maria (1826–85), daughter of Ashurst Turner, Principal of Brasenose, had been left blind by an attack of scarlet fever while still a child. Together with W. Hanks Levy, she founded the Association for promoting the General Welfare of the Blind, and also published Blindness and the Blind (1872). Newman noted her death in his book of anniversaries. (DNB), 281.
Giles, Anne, parishioner at Littlemore, wife of William, 155, 162, 164.
Giles, John Allen (1808–84), was educated at Charterhouse and Corpus Christi College, where he was elected to a scholarship in 1824, graduated M.A. in 1831, and was a Fellow from 1832–3. From 1834–6 he was Master of Camberwell College School, and from 1836–40 was Headmaster of the City of London School. Vicar of Bampton from 1845–54, he was ordered by Bishop Wilberforce in the latter year to suppress his Christian Records. In the following year he was imprisoned in Oxford Castle for falsifying an entry in Bampton marriage register in order to protect a servant. He was Vicar of Sutton, Surrey, from 1867 to his death. A prolific translator and editor, his output included the 34 volume Patres Ecclesiae Anglicanae, translations of Matthew Paris and Bede, and he also wrote lives of Becket and King Alfred. (DNB), 501.
Giles, William, farmer and maltster at Littlemore, at whose house Newman stayed during the summer of 1841, the Lent of 1842, and while his cottages were being prepared, 44, 158, 219–20.
Gladstone (VI), William Ewart (1809–98), 8, 35, 144, 175, 179, 209, 317, 324–5, 330–2, 344, 348–50, 358, 369, 382, 409–13, 415, 417, 419–20, 422–4, 446–7, 456–7, 467.
Gloucester and Bristol, Bishop of, see Monk, J. H.
Glover, probably Frederick Robert Augustus (VII; 1800–81), 386, 394.
Glover, J., probably James David, curate at both St Mary's and St Gabriel's, Binbrook, near Market Rasen, Lincs., 152.
pg 623Glover, Thomas (1781–1849), was educated at Stonyhurst and entered the Society of Jesus in 1803, thus being one of the first novices after the Society's restoration. He taught at Stonyhurst for some years and was sent out to Rome in 1826, where he quickly became a crucial figure in the Society's affairs, being nominated Secretary in 1829. Following the revolution in Rome, he returned to England in 1849, where his health quickly broke down, 8, 9, 12.
Golbourne, for Goulbourn, Edward (1787–1868), became a Cornet in the Horse Guards in 1803 and a Lieutenant in the following year. In 1805 he published The Blueviad, a satirical poem, and the subsequent prosecution for libel led to his withdrawal from the army. He entered himself at the Middle Temple and was called to the bar in 1815. Appointed a Welsh judge, he then received the Recorderships of Leicester, Lincoln, and Boston. He was M.P. for Leicester from 1835–7. His eldest son, Edward Meyrick, became Headmaster of Rugby School and Dean of Norwich, and also published Reminiscences of C.P. Golightly (1886). (DNB), 251.
Goldney, Adam, entered Trinity College, Cambridge, aged 19, in 1828, B.A. 1832, M.A. 1838. He was ordained for the Diocese of Oxford, deacon in 1832, priest in 1833, and went to Dorchester, Oxon., as curate in 1832, then to South Moreton, Bucks., in 1838, and from 1839–45 was curate at Cuddesdon. He was Vicar of East Pennard, Somerset from 1845–89, and was a Prebendary of Wells from 1871 until his death at Clifton in 1898, 27, 255.
Goldsmid (VII), Nathaniel (1807–60), 70, 93, 158, 394, 396, 416–17, 419, 424, 428, 430, 432, 499.
Golightly (VI), Charles Portales (1807–85), 59–61, 63, 66–8, 109–10, 113, 116, 279, 352, 364–6, 371–2, 374, 381, 434, 436, 453.
Gooch, John, Oxford Bookseller, appears to have become a Catholic late in 1841 or early in 1842. In the latter year he held a book sale, got rid of his Oxford shop and moved to London and new premises at 17A, Great George Street, Westminster, 227, 468.
Goode (VI), William (1801–68), 483.
Gordon, Captain, probably J. E., for some years Secretary to the Protestant Association, and author of tracts such as British Legislature.—On the Admission of Roman Catholics to Parliament, and their Violation of their Oath, 12.
Gordon, Dr, 258.
Goring (VII), Harry Dent (1801–59), 158.
Gorlick, Mr, 452.
Grant (VI), Anthony (1806–83), 396.
Grant, Johnson (1820–1904), son of the zealous Perpetual Curate of Kentish Town, entered St John's, his father's old College, in 1838. A friend of William Lockhart, and of keen Catholic opinions, he was received into the Catholic Church at the end of 1841 (or early in 1842). He joined the Society of Jesus soon after his conversion, taking the name Ignatius, 400, 404, 451, 461–2, 478.
Gray, John Hamilton (1800–67), educated at Glasgow and at Magdalen College, where he was a Gentleman Commoner, B.A. 1824. From 1824–8 he practised as a member of the Scottish bar, during which time he began his lifetime hobby of extensive continental travel. Vicar of Bolsover, Derby, from 1833–66, he was appointed Rural Dean of Chesterfield in 1847. He was me author of On the Ordaining Influence of the Holy Ghost (1837), and Sermons in Rome during Lent 1838 (1842). (Boase I), 191–2, 428, 434.
Green, probably Martin Johnson, matriculated from Trinity College in 1832, aged 18, was a Scholar of Lincoln College from 1833–6, B.A. 1836, and a Fellow from 1837–49. He became Rector of Winterbourne Abbas, Dorset, in 1848, and was appointed a Prebendary of Salisbury Cathedral in 1879, 4.
Green, Dr, 229, 235.
Greenhill (VII), William Alexander (1814–94), 23, 240.
Grenfell (VI), Algernon, 401, 434.
Gresley (VII), William (1801–76), 114–15, 521.
Grey, for Gray, Robert Henry, entered Christ Church in May 1836, aged 18, and held a Studentship from 1836–48, B.A. 1840, M.A. 1842. Gray took a keen interest in the Oxford Movement and undertook the volume on St Hugh of Lincoln for the Lives of the English Saints, and, though the life was never published, he completed a great deal of the necessary research. He took orders, was Vicar of Kirkby, Liverpool from 1850–77, was appointed an Honorary Canon of Chester Cathedral in 1867, and was Rector of Wolsingham, Durham, from 1877 until his death in 1885. He was an author of various theological works, including The Inspiration of Holy Scripture (1859), and On the Difficulties of the First Chapter of Genesis (1860). (Boase I), 113.
Griffith, Mr, 36, 191.
Griffiths, John (1806–85), educated at Winchester College, was elected a Scholar of Wadham College in 1824, graduating B.A. in 1827. Elected to a Fellowship in 1830, he went on to hold various College lectureships, and was Sub-Warden for seventeen years from 1837. Unsympathetic to Catholic views, indeed with a distaste for all religious partisanship, he was one of the Four Tutors who protested against Tract 90. He was appointed Keeper of the University Archives, a post which he held for the rest of his life. In 1871 he was elected Warden of Wadham, resigning ten years later to return to his house in St Giles. He edited, among other works, the Laudian Statutes, collected material for a new edition of Wood's Athenae Oxonienses, and built up a very fine collection of prints and etchings. (DNB), 59–61, 109, 116, 152.
Griffiths, Messrs, 507.
Grove or Groves, Mr, 354, 357, 363.
pg 624Guillemard (VII), Henry Peter, 203, 276, 499.
Haddan (VI), Arthur West (1816–73), 25, 28, 35, 38, 56, 72, 117, 129, 154, 167, 170, 180, 186, 189–93, 202–4, 210, 214–16, 219, 223, 229–30, 246, 255, 258, 261, 273, 276, 357, 396, 400, 408, 419, 421, 425, 428, 493;
family, 255, 258.
Haight, Mr, American visitor to Oxford, 208.
Hale (VI), William Hale (1795–1870), 313, 338.
Hall (VI), Peter (1803–49), 406.
Hallam, Henry (1777–1859), historian, was educated at Eton and Christ Church, B.A. 1799. He was called to the bar, but gave up the law for a literary career, which commenced with contributions to the Edinburgh Review. Financial independence was made possible by an office in the Stamp department, which had been acquired through his Whig connections. He published his View of the State of Europe during the Middle Ages in 1818, and nine years later completed his Constitutional History of England, 1485–1760. The Introduction to the Literature of Europe in the 15th, 16th, and 17th Centuries, his last great work, appeared in 1838, and was later supplemented by Notes. (DNB), 382.
Hamilton (VI), Walter Kerr (1808–69), 96, 250, 252, 257, 275, 333, 344, 348.
Hampden (VI), Renn Dickson (1793–1868), 74, 101, 126, 515.
Hannah, John (1818–88), son of the Secretary and later President of the Wesleyan Conference, was a Scholar of Corpus Christi College from 1837–40, and Fellow of Lincoln College from 1840–4, where he became friendly with Mark Pattison. He was Rector of Edinburgh Academy, 1847–52;
Warden of Trinity College, Glenalmond, 1854–70;
Vicar of Brighton, 1870–87;
and Archdeacon of Lewes from 1876 to death. He was author of Discourses on the Fall and its Result (1857) and other works. (Boase I), 357, 445, 471, 515;
father, 445.
Hansell (VII), Edward Halifax (1814–84), 59, 109.
Harding (VII), John Dorney (1809–68), 204, 206, 369, 452, 454.
Hardinge, Sir Henry (1785–1856), entered the army at the age of fifteen and served with distinction in the Peninsular Campaign. In 1828 he became Secretary for War, and was afterwards Chief Secretary for Ireland. In 1844 he was appointed Governor General of India. As second in command to Sir Hugh Gough he helped to achieve victory in the Anglo-Sikh War, for which he was created Viscount and was awarded both Government and East India Company pensions. Having returned to England, he was appointed Master General of the Ordnance in 1852, and succeeded Wellington as Commander in Chief. (DNB), 276.
Harris, Charles Amyand (1813–74), third son of the Earl of Malmesbury, entered Oriel in 1831, B.A. 1835, and was a Fellow of All Souls from 1835–7. He took orders, held various livings, was a Prebendary of Salisbury from 1841–63, and Archdeacon of Wiltshire from 1863–68. In the latter year he was consecrated Bishop of Gibraltar, and remained there for the rest of his life. (DNB), 350.
Harris, T., Dissenting Minister, 436.
Harrison (VI), Benjamin (1808–87), 4, 6, 111, 179, 202, 219, 240, 292, 305, 330–1, 336, 406, 425, 431.
Harrison, probably James Park (VII), 179.
Hassells, Charles Stephen, entered Trinity College in October 1818, B.A. 1822, M.A. 1825. Newman noted his death at the age of 77 on 31 Dec. 1878 in his book of anniversaries, 303, 310.
Hatton, Isaac, his wife Sarah, and son and daughter John and Sarah, were parishioners at Littlemore. Newman noted Isaac's death on 5 Nov. 1843 in his book of anniversaries, 463–5, 471.
Hawker, Robert Stephen (1803–75), entered Pembroke College in 1823, and later in the same year married Charlotte Wrey, aged 41. He migrated to Magdalen Hall, won the Newdigate Prize with a poem on Pompeii in 1827, and took orders in 1829. At the end of 1834 he became Vicar of Morwenstow on the north east corner of Cornwall, and remained there till death. He cared for many of the sailors wrecked on the nearby coast and buried more than forty in his churchyard. Hawker was a poet who treated religious or Cornish themes. He was an eccentric, though with many friends, including his neighbour William Maskell, and suffered much from poverty. He was a follower of the Tractarians, and was later attracted by the Catholic Church. His wife died, after a happy married life, at the age of 81, early in 1863. At the end of 1864 Hawker married Pauline Anne Kucynski, daughter of a Polish exile, whom he met when she was a governess in his parish. By her he had three daughters. When he was dying, his wife, understanding his unspoken wishes, sent for a priest, who received him into the Catholic Church. See Volume XXVII, 225, for Newman's 'kind note' concerning Hawker's state of mind six months before his death. (DNB), 240, 250.
Hawkins, Edward (1780–1867), archaeologist and numismatist, F.R.S. 1821, F.S.A. 1826, was Keeper of Antiquities at the British Museum from 1826–60. He gathered an immense collection of political caricatures, and also of books and prints relating to his native Cheshire, and was the author of Silver Coins of England (1841), and Descriptions of the Anglo-Gallic Coins and Ancient Marbles in the British Museum. (DNB), 13–15.
Hawkins (VI), Edward (1798–1882), 6, 29, 66, 72–3, 92, 99, 110, 185, 205–7, 211, 231, 267, 278, 298, 333, 337, 345, 372, 385, 411, 418, 452, 463, 496–7, 515;
Mrs E. Hawkins, 29;
Caesar Richard Hawkins, 29.
Hawkins (VI), Ernest (1801–68), 282.
Haycroft, young servant at Oriel, attended Newman, of whom he retained the liveliest memories. He was of a simple and devout faith, and was a regular communicant at his parish church of St Thomas's well into old age. He died in 1912, 218–19.
pg 625Hayter (VI), George Goodenough, 276.
Hayter and Howell, Messrs, 368.
Heathcote (VI), Sir William (1801–81), 36, 44–5, 171, 178, 225, 272–3.
Heathcote, William Beadon (1813–62), was educated at Winchester, and at New College where he was Fellow from 1832–53, during which time he held the College offices of Tutor, Bursar, and Sub-Warden. Precentor of Salisbury Cathedral from 1854 to death, he was also a Prebendary from 1856. In a period of crisis between 1851 and 1853, he had been called upon by Radley to take on the Wardenship. Vicar of Sturminster Marshall from 1858–62, he was then Rector of Compton Bassett for the remaining months of his life. He published The Psalter with the Gregorian Tones (1845), and Harmonised Gregorian Tones for the Psalter (1849). (Boase I), 240.
Hedley, William, entered Queen's College in 1837, aged 18, and was a Michel Exhibitioner from 1837–40, and Scholar from 1840–43, when he was elected to a Fellowship. From 1844–62 he was a Fellow of University College, and he held the posts of Tutor, Bursar and Dean at different times. On the question of University Reform, he was one of the moderates led by H. L. Mansel who supported the abolition of close Fellowships and the extension of studies to include history, law and physical science, but opposed any substantial alteration of the religious tests. From 1861–78 he was Rector of Beckley, Sussex. He died in 1884, 496.
Hemmings, or Hemming, Mr, 477, 481.
Henderson (VI), Thomas, 70, 93, 180, 189, 203, 232, 319–20, 326, 356, 410, 427, 446.
Hewett, Mr G., 249–50.
Hewitt, for Hewett (VII), John, 407.
Heyse, or Huyse, Dr, 29, 39.
Hill (VI), Erroll, 191.
Hill, Mr, 4, 6.
Hobhouse, Edmund (1817–1904), entered Balliol College in 1834, B.A. 1838. He was a Fellow of Merton College from 1841–57, and Vicar of St Peter-in-the-East from 1843–58, when he went out to New Zealand as Bishop of Nelson, where he remained for seven years. On his return to England he worked as an Assistant Bishop to Bishops Selwyn and then Maclagan of Lichfield. He was a founder of the Somerset Record Society and edited some volumes. (DNB), 408.
Hodson (VI), George (1787–1855), 278.
Holmes (VII), Mary (1815?–78), 27, 31, 33, 161–3, 238–9, 246, 250, 261–5, 276, 317–18, 362, 366–8, 473–4, 477, 482–3, 489, 503, 508.
Hook (VI), Walter Farquhar (1798–1875), 4, 15, 35–9, 44–5, 54, 98–100, 111, 113, 115, 117–23, 129, 144 5, 157, 162–4, 167, 185, 221, 235–7, 250, 253, 276, 299, 343, 373, 410–11, 439, 444–5, 454, 496.
Hopwood, possibly Robert (1773–1854), educated at Rugby and Trinity College, Cambridge, of Hopwood Hall, Lancs., 251.
Houghton, W., 191–2, 510.
Howley (VI), William (1766–1848), 32, 49, 100–1, 115, 123–4, 127, 156, 190–1, 277, 281, 291–2, 295–6, 306, 324, 343–4, 348, 362, 401–3, 406–14, 417–18, 429–32, 436, 446–7, 450, 457, 465, 467, 476, 499.
Hudel'eau, or Hudelot, Rev. R., 189.
Hughes, Isaac, 477.
Hughes (VII), John William, 211, 429, 474.
Humphries, Richard, parishioner. The Oxford Times reported in 1899 that, 'the death has occurred in his 84th year, of Richard Humphries, who was appointed Parish Clerk of Littlemore by Dr Newman, who taught him to play the violin. He once went to see Newman at the Oratory, B'ham, and was told that he could not see him. "Tell him that Richard from Littlemore has come to ask how he is. I hadn't to wait long" (continued the old man). "I knew his step: he never waited even to put on his boots, but came along in his slippers, and said, 'Come in and tell me about all my dear people.' " Richard went in and dined with the Cardinal and other members of the Oratory.' Newman had called on the surviving members of the family when he visited Littlemore in 1868, 418;
Mary Humphries, 455.
Huntley, Richard Webster (1793–1857), entered Oriel in 1811, B.A. 1815, and was a Fellow of All Souls from 1815–31. Vicar of Alderbury, Salop, from 1829 to death, he received the additional living of Boxwell and Leighterton, Gloucs. (which he helped to endow), in 1831. In 1848 he was one of the three clergymen to oppose the appointment of R.D. Hampden to the see of Hereford, first at Bow, and then at Queen's Bench. (Boase I), 246.
Hurst, Susanna, parishioner at Littlemore, 37.
Hussey (VI), Robert (1801–56), 59, 109, 276, 508–9.
Hussey, Thomas John, graduated B.A. from Trinity College, Dublin, in 1819, D.D. 1835. In 1831 became Rector of Hayes, Kent. He was admitted ad eundem at Oxford in 1836, 175.
Hutchins, William Thomas, entered Worcester College in 1838, aged 19, B.A. 1841. He was entered at the Inner Temple in 1839, but died in 1844, 496.
Inglis (VII), John (1777–1850), 36.
Inglis (VI), Sir Robert Harry (1786–1855), 108.
Ingram (VI), James (1774–1850), 431–2, 476.
Iremonger, Frederick Assheton, entered Pembroke College in 1835, aged 19, and was a Scholar from 1835–42. Having taken orders, he went for a while to Cholderton, as an assistant curate to T. Mozley, who described him as 'my exceedingly amusing and genial friend,' Reminiscences, pg 626chiefly of Towns, Villages and Schools, London 1885, II, 346. Iremonger became Vicar of Bullington, Hants., in 1857, and retained the living until his death in 1887. In 1872 he assumed the surname of Lloyd, 202.
Jackson (VII), Edward, 28, 31.
Jacob, Philip (1803–84), entered Christ Church in 1821, B.A. 1825. After working as a curate at Newport, Monmouth, he became Rector of Crawley with Hunton, Wilts., in 1831. In 1834 he was appointed to a residentiary canonry of Winchester Cathedral, and in 1860 became Archdeacon. (Boase II), 225–7.
Jacobson (VI), William (1803–84), 461.
James (VI), William (1787–1861), 70, 191–2, 198–9, 494–6, 498.
Jarvis, Samuel Farmar, Rector of Christ Church, Middletown, and Professor of Oriental Languages and Literature in Washington College, Connecticut. He published numerous sermons and other pamphlets, 205, 369.
Jeffrey, Mr, 357.
Jelf (VII), Richard William (1798–1871), 6–7, 15, 63, 70, 76, 78–90, 97, 111, 124, 164, 190, 198–9, 208, 226, 313, 351, 363, 521;
H. Sharpe Jelf or Jelf Sharpe, 363, 370.
Jenkyns (VI), Richard (1782–1854), 200, 204.
Jenner, Sir Herbert (1778–1852), educated at Reading and Trinity Hall, Cambridge, LL.B. 1798, LL.D. 1803. He was called to the bar at Gray's Inn in 1800, became an advocate in ecclesiastical and admiralty courts, and was King's Advocate General from 1828–34. From 1832–34 Jenner was Vicar General to the Archbishop of Canterbury, and then became Dean of the Court of Arches, the Archbishop's Consistory Court. As such, he presided at the Gorham case between 1847 and 1850. On acceding to the property of his cousin in 1842, he took the additional name of Fust. (DNB), 312, 389, 394, 449–50.
Johnson (VII), George Henry Sacheverell (1801–81), 59, 109, 333.
Johnson (VI), Manuel (1805–59), 13, 21, 32, 41, 43–4, 65, 170, 176–7, 186, 193, 195–6, 198–9, 210, 223, 235, 246, 250–1, 255, 258, 265–6, 273, 275, 282, 295, 304, 341, 378, 381, 386, 394, 396, 400, 408, 419, 425, 430, 435, 442, 498, 501.
Jones (VII), Hugh Wynne (1802–48), 293, 413, 416, 425.
Jubber (VI), parishioner, 238.
Keats, Mr, 21.
Keble (VI), Thomas (1793–1875), 33, 41, 72, 146–7, 154, 258, 260–1, 266, 273, 278.
Kennaway (VII), Charles Edward (1800–75), 310, 456, 458.
Kent (VII), John, 21, 24, 183.
Kerr (VII), William Williamson, 4.
Kerslake, Thomas (1812–91), 'Old and New Book-seller' based at 3, Park Street, Bristol, from 1828–70, despite a disastrous fire, which destroyed much of an outstanding collection, in 1860. Though self-taught, he was a competent linguist and published a number of articles and pamphlets on antiquarian topics. Newman dealt with him a good deal in the early 1840s. (DNB), 15, 24, 191, 193–4, 477.
Kestner, Augustus Christian (1777–1853), was Hanoverian Consul at Rome, and from 1824–49 acted as an agent for the protection of British and Hanoverian interests. He was an art collector and also a friend of C. C. J. Bunsen, 9.
Kidd (VI), Dr John (1775–1851), 276, 499.
Killikelly or Killikelly, Dr, 'American', to whom Newman gave a £2.0.0. donation, 206, 216, 219.
Kilvert (VI), Francis (1793–1863), 31, 38, 168, 202, 477, 489–90.
King, Mr, 20.
Mr King, 'of Salisbury', 465.
Kirkpatrick, Thomas, of '32 Fleet Street Liverpool', 477–9, 485.
Knight Bruce, see Bruce, H. L. K.
Knight, Mr, 21.
Landzelle (VI), William Crampton (1784 or 5–1852), 176, 178–9, 183, 186, 189, 416.
Langbridge, H. C, bookseller of 14, Bull Street, Birmingham, 197, 200, 335.
Laprimaudaye (VI), Charles John (1807–58), 343, 349.
Lardner (VII, 70), Mr, 249, 251, 255, 418, 424.
Law (VI), George Henry (1761–1845), 185.
Le Bas (VI), Charles Webb (1779–1861), 184, 343, 381, 386, 485.
Lee, Mr, 161.
Lee, Sackville Usher Bolton (1806–89), entered Oriel in 1825, attended Newman's mathematics lectures, B.A. 1828. He was ordained deacon in 1830, priest in 1838, was Rector of Allhallows-on-the-Walls, Exeter, from 1846–61, and of Allhallows, Goldsmith Street, from 1861–6. In 1853 he was appointed Prebendary of Exeter Cathedral, in 1865 Canon, and in 1885 treasurer. (Boase VI), 45, 343, 352.
Lee (VII), Mrs Thomas, 201.
Leetron, Mr, 246, 250, 255.
Lefever, Mr, 240, 255.
Leger, 197, 199.
Lenthall (VII), Elizabeth, 189, 191, 193.
Lenthall (VII), Mrs, 438.
pg 627Leslie (VII), J., Bookseller, 186, 190, 202, 372–3, 375, 378, 380–1.
Lethbridge (VII), Ambrose Goddard (1804–75), 23, 25, 279.
Lewis (VI), David (1814–95), 21, 25, 37, 177, 208, 235, 253, 255, 271, 282, 407, 430, 436, 473, 481, 488, 501, 506.
Lewis, Mr, 186, 188.
Lingard, possibly Joshua, entered St Mary Hall in 1823, aged 25, B.A. 1827, M.A. 1831. He took orders and was Perpetual Curate of St George's, Hulme, Manchester, from 1828 until his death in November 1842, 230, 235, 253, 271.
Linwood, Mr, 496.
Litton (VI), Edward Arthur (1814–97), 238, 408, 430, 496, 500.
Livingston, Vanbrugh, of New York, author of Remarks on the 'Oxford Theology,' in connection with . . . the Doctrine of Justification by Faith (1841), 202.
Lloyd, possibly Humphrey (1800–81), entered Trinity College, Dublin, in 1815, gaining first prize at the entrance examination. He had a brilliant undergraduate career, graduating B.A. in 1819 with first place and the gold medal for science. He was elected to a junior Fellowship in 1824, was Erasmus Smith's Professor of Natural and Experimental Philosophy from 1831–43, was President of the Royal Irish Academy from 1846–51, and became Provost of Trinity College in 1867. His published writings on optics and astronomy contained the results of his experiments. He also made important discoveries in the field of magnetic research. (DNB), 105.
Lloyd, Mrs Mary Harriet, neé Stapleton, widow of Charles Lloyd, Bishop of Oxford. They were married in 1822, and, upon her husband's elevation in 1827, they moved to Cuddesdon. After the Bishop's death in 1829 she moved back to central Oxford with her children and was often seen accompanying her daughters in society, 209.
Lockhart, William (1819–92), only son of Alexander Lockhart by his second wife, was at Exeter College from 1838 to 1842, and, on taking his B.A., joined Newman at Littlemore, in the July of that year. A friend of Johnson Grant (q.v.), he had felt drawn to the Catholic Church himself. Although realising that Newman hesitated over his own power to confer the Sacrament of Penance which Lockhart sought, he nevertheless made a promise to remain at Littlemore as an Anglican for three years. In Aug. 1843, his un-settlement led him to consult Father Gentili, the Rosminian Missioner, and within three days he was received. His conversion led to Newman's resignation of St Mary's. Lockhart at once joined the Rosminian Fathers of Charity, and was professed at Ratcliffe College in Sept. 1845. His spent his life as a Missioner and writer, known as an exemplary religious and one full of charity for his former co-religionists. Always a disciple of Newman, he wrote after his death, Cardinal Newman: Reminiscences of Fifty Tears since (1891), in which, among many things, he spoke of New-man's 'simplicity, meekness, and humility;
God, not self, was the centre of all his thoughts', and of him as 'a seer, who saw God, and the things of God, and spoke that which he had seen,' (p. 24). (DNB), 510.
Lohy, Mr, 485–6.
Longley (VII), Charles Thomas (1794–1868), 157, 236, 299, 409, 579–80.
Lorain, Hilaire (1796–1866), was from 1820 to 1844 a Professor at the Seminary at Langres, and from 1838 its Superior. Early in his years there he was converted from Gallican to Ultramontane views. He had a reputation as a confessor, and was a friend of Lacordaire and Dupanloup, He visited Oxford in Sept. 1841 and came to England again in 1843. See Volume XXX, 199, for Newman's letter recalling Lorain's kindness when he visited Langres in 1846, 279.
Lowe (VII), Robert (1811–92), 170.
Lucas, Miss, parishioner of St Mary's, probably of the family of the local 'cordwainer', 445.
Lumley, Edward, Bookseller and Publisher of 56, Chancery Lane, London. He advertised: 'Law and Miscellaneous Libraries Purchased', 175, 194, 196–7.
Luscombe (VI), Michael Henry Thornhill (1776–1846), 309.
Luxmoore, John Henry Montague, son of John Luxmoore (1756–1830), who was Bishop successively of Bristol, Hereford and Saint Asaph. He was a contemporary of Pusey at Eton, and married the latter's eldest sister, Elizabeth Bouverie, in 1827, 6, 15.
Lyall, William Rowe (1788–1857), educated at Trinity College, Cambridge, B.A. 1810, he took orders and held several livings. From 1816–17 he was editor of Brit. Crit., in 1820 set about reorganising the Encyclopaedia Metropolitana to which he contributed, and from 1832–46 was joint editor, with H.J. Rose, of the Theological Library, for which Ari. was originally commissioned. His Propaedia Prophetica, a View of the Use and Design of the Old Testament appeared in 1840. He was appointed Archdeacon of Colchester in 1824, and was Archdeacon of Maidstone from 1841 until 1845 when he was appointed Dean of Canterbury. (DNB), 373.
Lyell (VII), Sir Charles (1797–1875), 105.
Maclaine, Archibald (1722–1804), Scottish divine, whose translation of Mosheim's Ecclesiastical History first appeared in 1765, and continued to be reprinted until 1825. (DNB), 244.
Macaulay, Mr, 7.
MacHale, John, (1791–1881), appointed Archbishop of Tuam in 1834, was an inflexible opponent of mixed education and a vehement Irish nationalist. He resisted Archbishop Cullen in the matter of the Catholic University in Dublin, accusing him of exercising too independent a control over it. He also opposed the appointment pg 628of Newman as Rector, because he was an Englishman, although entertaining a high opinion of him personally. (DNB), 276.
Macray (VII), John (1796–1878), 282, 398.
Magdalen College, President of, see Routh, Martin Joseph.
Maitland (VI), Samuel Roffey (1792–1866), 10, 24, 521.
Mallock, William, entered Balliol College in Dec. 1827, aged 17, B.A. 1831, M.A. 1834, B.D. 1841, He was Perpetual Curate of Tormohun, Devon, from 1833–44, when he became Rector of Cheriton Bishop. He married Margaret, daughter of Archdeacon Froude, and their eldest son, William, attained fame soon after leaving Oxford by his The New Republic, 1877, a witty reductio ad absurdum of the religious liberalism of Jowett and his circle, 278, 499.
Maltby (VII), Edward (1770–1859), 299, 576–8.
Manners (VII), Lord John (1818–1906), 35–6, 38, 41, 44–5, 209, 456.
Mannings, the, probably Charles John (1797–1880), and his wife Catherine and children. He was a brother of Henry Edward Manning (q.v.) and he and his family also became Catholics, 266, 271.
Manning (VI), Henry Edward (1808–92), 20, 24, 28, 44–5, 48, 75, 96, 98, 123, 128–9, 114, 149, 157, 179, 184, 191, 197, 221, 229–30, 233, 235, 238, 246, 276–7, 308, 350, 353–4, 357, 369, 375, 382, 405, 410–12, 446–7, 456, 470.
Mant (VI), Frederick Woods, 37, 196.
Mar Athanasius, Syrian Bishop of Malabar, 20–1, 488.
Marriott (VI), Charles (1811–58), 3–5, 7, 13, 20, 21, 23, 25, 28, 36, 37–8, 44–5, 56, 66, 97, 154, 170, 177, 186, 191, 199, 201–3, 206, 210, 219–20, 223–4, 232, 235, 240, 249, 251, 253, 255, 258, 261, 266, 268, 271, 273–4, 276, 278–9, 281–2, 285, 302, 304, 333–4, 336, 371, 375, 380, 383, 394, 396, 400, 408, 413, 419, 430–1, 454, 463, 470, 473–4, 483, 496, 498–9, 508, 510, 513–14.
Marriott (VI), John, 14, 219–20, 240, 255, 258, 498.
Martyn, probably Thomas, Rector of Ludgershall, Bucks., since 1821, 191–2.
Maule, Mr, 272.
Maurice (VI), John Frederick Denison (1805–72), 185, 344, 352, 447, 453.
M'Caul, Alexander (1799–1863), graduated B.A. from Trinity College, Dublin, in 1819, D.D. 1837. From 1821–32 he worked in Poland as a missionary for the London Society for Promoting Christianity among the Jews. He then settled in London and started a magazine on questions of Jewish ritual, and, in 1840, became Principal of the Hebrew College. In 1841 he was appointed Professor of Hebrew and Rabbinical Literature at King's College, London, and in 1846 he acquired the additional chair of Divinity. (DNB), 291.
McGhee, Robert James (1789–1872), was a Scholar of Trinity College, Dublin, B.A. 1810. Two years later he took orders and was Minister of Harold's Cross Church, Dublin, from 1838–46, and then Rector of Holywell, St Ives, Hunts., until death. McGhee was an itinerant lecturer of the Protestant Association, and a bitter opponent of Tractarianism and Roman Catholicism. In 1842 he challenged Newman to a public debate, and offered the same challenge to W. Gresley in 1851 on the question of auricular confession. His various works included Truth and Error Contrasted (1830) and Romanism as it Rules in Ireland (1840). (Boase VI), 111, 475, 512–15.
Melbourne, Henry William Lamb (1779–1848), 2nd Viscount, 212, 218.
Merewether (VI), Francis (1784–1864), 183, 216, 219.
Miley, John (c.1805?–1861), priest in Dublin, educated at Maynooth and Rome. A friend of Daniel O'Connell, whom he tried to reconcile with the Young Ireland party in 1846. He was Rector of the Irish College, Paris, from 1849–59, when he returned to Ireland. He published works on ecclesiastical history. (DNB), 299.
Mill (VI), William Hodge (1792–1853), 21, 203–5, 219, 285, 288, 291, 304–6, 340, 348.
Miller (VI), Charles (1796–1885), 36–8, 45, 56.
Miller, George (1764–1848), graduated B.A. from Trinity College, Dublin in 1784, took orders, and was elected to a Fellowship in 1789. An enthusiastic member of Grattan's Historical Society, Miller was from 1803–11 Lecturer in Modern History at Dublin, publishing eight volumes of Lectures on the Philosophy of Modern History between 1816 and 1828. His staunch Protestantism is evidenced in his prolific output of tracts, lectures and other works. Anti-Tractarian, Miller replied to Pusey's Letter to the Bishop of Oxford in a Letter of his own, and this in turn led to a friendly correspondence with C. P. Golightly. (DNB), 228, 233–5.
Miller (VI), John (1787–1858), 115, 171.
Miller, Joseph Kirkman (1785–1855), was educated at St Paul's School, entered Trinity College, Cambridge, in 1804, and won a Scholarship in the following year. He graduated B.A. (8th Wrangler and 1st Chancellor's Medal) in 1807, and was elected to a Fellowship in 1808. He was Vicar of Walkeringham, Notts., from 1819–55, and in 1830 received the additional benefices of Bockleton, Worcs., and Laysters, Heref, 199–200.
Milman (VII), Henry Hart (1791–1868), 7, 126.
Milnes (VI), Richard Monckton, First Baron Houghton (1809–85), 201, 473.
Moberly (VI), George (1803–86), 97–8, 111, 154, 184, 352, 383–4, 386, 412, 424, 427.
Monk (VII), James Henry (1784–1856), 287, 581–2.
Monro (VII), Edward (1815–66), 10, 455.
Monro, Edward Thomas (1794–1856), entered Oriel in 1804, B.A. 1809, B. Med. 1811, D. Med. 1814. In 1816 he was made a Fellow of the Royal College of Physicians, he went on to hold the different offices of Censor and Consiliarius on three different occasions, was Harveian Orator in 1834, and was Treasurer of the College from 1845–54. pg 629He was physician to Bethlehem Hospital. (Boase II), 455.
Monro (VI), Henry (1817–91), 455.
Mordaunt (VII), Mary, 3;
see also under Acland, T. D.
Morgan, David, entered Jesus College in 1812, aged 19, B.A. 1815, M.A. 1818. He took orders and worked for some years as curate at Amport, near Andover, Hants., before being presented to the rich living of Ham, where he died in 1864, aged 71, 179, 183.
Morpeth (VI), George William Frederick, Lord (1802–64), 69, 102, 108–9.
Morris (VI), John Brande (1812–80), 16, 25, 45, 175, 177, 184, 250–1, 255, 257, 266, 271, 273, 275, 304, 357, 380, 385, 427, 459, 462, 464, 491–2, 512.
Morris (VI), Thomas Edward, 41, 235, 249, 255, 276, 419, 427, 430, 510.
Mozley (VI), Anne (1809–91), 58, 107, 193, 338, 341.
Mozley, Henry Williams (1842–1919), third son of Newman's sister Jemima, was a Colleger at Eton, and a Scholar at King's College, Cambridge, where he took his B.A., as 16th Wrangler and 7th Classic, in 1864. He was a Fellow of King's from 1863–87, and a House Master at Eton from 1864 to 1897, very interested in music and an authority on Dante. In 1886 he married Clare Chandler, whose brother became Anglican Bishop of Bloemfontein. H. W. Mozley was a High Churchman, and he wrote to Anne Mozley the day after Newman died: 'He only spoke to me of the wish of his heart (10 years ago when I saw him after my mother's death) and as I could not gratify that there seemed to me something of a barrier between us, which no doubt was all on my side'. He was one of the principal mourners at Newman's funeral, 510.
Mozley (VI), James Bowling (1813–78), 10, 27–8, 37–8, 56, 58, 63, 156–7, 170–1, 177, 184, 186, 188, 191, 197, 205, 209–10, 216, 222–3, 226, 232, 250, 278–9, 298, 302, 304, 310–11, 442, 470, 496, 499–501.
Mozley (VI), John (1805–72), 90, 102, 338, 456, 463–4.
Mozley, Mrs, 338.
Mozley (VI), Mrs Thomas (1803–52), Harriett Newman, 6–7, 19, 21, 28, 31, 33–4, 37, 40, 45–6, 61, 67–8, 72, 77, 90–2, 113, 121–2, 129, 145, 178, 183, 196, 214–15, 218–19, 226, 229, 231–2, 250, 254, 257, 273–5, 277, 280, 288, 293, 295–6, 330, 335, 338, 341, 356–7, 361, 368–9, 385, 421–2, 448, 463–4, 470, 492, 503, 507–8, 510, 512.
Mules (VII), Philip, 67, 167, 170, 180, 258, 471, 488.
Murray, Daniel (1768–1852), trained for the priesthood at Salamanca, and was ordained in 1790. His experiences at the time of the 1798 rebellion were to have an indelible effect on his outlook. Coadjutor Bishop in Dublin in 1809, he succeeded Archbishop Troy in 1823 and quickly won the respect of the British Government, being offered even a seat on the Privy Council. During the summer of 1841 he had friendly meetings with Pusey in Dublin. He was one of those who wished to accept the Queen's Colleges, but bowed to the majority decision of the Bishops to condemn them and to found a Catholic University. 'Murray, essentially a pastoral bishop, was a prudent churchman, with a realistic grasp of the practicalities of politics, well liked for his mild manner and personal goodness. His willingness to co-operate with the government aroused the suspicion of some of his fellow bishops and priests.' D. A. Kerr, Priests, People, and Politics in Famine Ireland, 1846–1852, p. 22. (DNB), 241–2, 244.
Murray (VII), George (1784–1860), 431.
Myers, Thomas, son of Thomas Myers (1774–1834) Professor of Mathematics at Woolwich Academy, entered Trinity College, Cambridge, in 1825, B.A. 1830, and was Hulsean prizeman in 1829 and Norrisian prizeman in 1832 and 1834. Ordained deacon in 1832, and priest in 1833, he was Vicar of Sheriff Hutton, near York, 1848–57, and Rector of Holy Trinity, Minster Yard, York, from 1857 until his death in 1867. (Boase VI), 164–5.
Neate (VI), Charles (1806–79), 267, 496.
Nellessen, G. A. (?–1845), 'Pastor primarius ad S Nicolaum' at Aix-la-Chapelle. He published a number of works, some of an irenic nature. He wrote against Hermesianism, and also on the question of mixed marriages, 452, 464, 474, 492.
New, Francis Thomas, matriculated from St John's College in 1824, aged 18, B.A. 1828, M.A. 1840. He took orders and was a curate to W. Dodsworth at Christ Church, St Pancras, for a while. He was received into the Catholic Church in 1847, worked as a solicitor, and seems to have been ordained priest towards the end of his life (he died in 1896), following the death of his wife, 98.
Newman (VI), Charles Robert (1802–84), 4, 6–7, 36, 54–5, 61, 64, 67–8, 167, 171, 180, 191, 199, 201–2, 214–16, 219–20, 223, 240, 249–51, 253–5, 265, 275–6, 279, 288, 293, 297, 302, 304, 312, 327, 335, 338, 343, 356–8, 361–3, 368, 377, 381, 394, 396, 408, 413, 415, 417, 436, 463–4.
Newman (VI), Elizabeth Good (1765–1852), 34, 38, 44, 61, 157, 164, 167–9, 193, 210, 213, 253–6, 470.
pg 630Newman (VII), Mrs Francis, Maria Kennaway, 384, 391, 394–6.
Newman (VI), Francis William (1805–97), 4, 6–7, 25, 48, 54, 61, 91, 171, 175, 180, 198, 203, 206, 208, 210, 214–16, 230, 254, 266, 276, 278–9, 288, 298, 302, 304, 312, 335, 362–3, 369, 37–3, 381, 384, 391, 394–6, 415, 428, 431, 448, 455–6, 462, 465, 470, 473.
Newman, John (1767–1824), banker, partner in the firm of Harrison, Prickett and Newman, and then of Ramsbottom, Newman and Ramsbottom, father of John Henry Newman, 68, 255–6.
Newman (VII), Mrs John (1772–1836), Jemima Fourdrinier, 511–12.
Newman, John Henry
Biographical, 44, 145, 178, 199, 213, 218–19, 284–5, 303, 338, 345–6, 404, 421, 452–3, 456, 463–4, 470, 501–5, 511–12;
'growing doubts', 146, 188, 300–1, 305, 384, 386, 440–2, 451–2;
'trusting Providence', 101, 142, 220, 247–8, 297;
Westmacott Bust, 502–3;
personal enquiries, 195;
Family Affairs, 33, 35, 55, 61, 68, 91, 106, 107, 128–9, 157, 167–8, 180, 213–15, 219, 250, 253–7, 297, 302, 338, 362–3, 463–4;
Socialists, 55.
Condolence and Sympathy, 20, 43, 69–70, 129, 193, 195, 307–8, 310, 357, 501–2, 511–12.
1838 Bishop of Oxford's Charge, 130;
Martyrs' Memorial, 268.
Oxford Movement, Origins, History and Progress of, 4–5, 23, 57–8, 103, 108, 131–6, 150, 165, 411, 450, 451, 464–5;
Question of Party, 185;
High Church Criticism, 373, 379;
Likely Attitude of Convocation, 70, 119;
American Views, 124, 217 (see also under Doane, G. W.);
Visits and Gatherings, 208, 230;
Hook's Church, 237, 299;
Bishop of New Zealand, 304–5, 310–11, 383, 436;
Theological Society, 38–9, 45, 123.
The Extreme Party, 242–4, 246–7, 341, 443–4;
Question of the Reformation, 233–4, 236–7, 240–5, 276–7;
Pusey's Feelings, 233, 240–2, 267–8;
Pusey in Ireland, 228–9, 232, 268, 298–9;
Pusey's Visit to Lambeth, 287, 292;
Pusey's Letter to the Archbishop, 325, 425–6, 431, 435, 437–8, 450–1, 454, 457, 467–9, 477, 484;
Reported Differences between Newman and Pusey, 360, 364–6, 386;
Position of Isaac Williams, 483–4, 507.
State of Affairs, 71, 182–3, 185, 190, 274, 281, 293, 300–1, 312–13, 321, 339–41, 366–7, 391–3, 400, 418, 426–7, 436–7, 459, 475, 478, 509;
Cheltenham Address, 401–3, 406–7, 411, 413–14, 417–18, 436, 456, 484;
Lawyers' Protest, 402–3, 407–8, 413–15, 458–9, 464–5;
Rumoured Condemnation by Bishops, 430–2, 435–7, 446, 460, 475;
High Church Attacks, 439, 444–5.
Tracts, 5, 34, 37–9, 131–6, 234, 453, 478, 480, 488;
Tracts in U.S.A., 124;
Tract 26, 255;
Tracts 67–9, 234, 488;
Tract 72, 135;
Tract 75, 133, 139;
Tracts 80 and 87, 132–3, 423, 426, 433;
Tract 81, 240;
Tract 85, 136, 192;
Tract 89, 132, 192;
Projected Tract 89, Part 2, and Tract on the Apocrypha, 115, 128, 156, 192.
Letters of 'Catholicus', 25, 26, 30–1, 40–1, 46–7, 56, 108, 180, 437, 425–6 passim; Reaction to, 40–1, 56, 108, 437.
Tract go, 47, 51, 56–158 passim, 160–1, 163, 166–9, 180, 187–8, 191–2, 195, 197–202, 241, 246, 320, 324, 388–9, 418, 453;
Early, 21, 25;
Keble's Advice, 38;
Beginning of 'Row', 45, 56, 58–9, 61;
Accounts of Episode, 45, 58, 77, 107–11, 156–7, 178.
Reason for Tract, 58;
Advice on Policy, 121, 191;
Newman's Meaning, 75–6, 128–9, 149, 388–9;
Last Paragraph, 75, 149–50.
Letter of Four Tutors, 56–63, 78, 83, 84, 103, 109, 111, 116, 117, 143;
Meetings of the Hebdomadal Board, 61, 63–7, 69, 72–3, 88–91, 93, 109, 110–11, 113–16, 118–20, 207;
1865–6 Recollections of Events, 72–3;
Hebdomadal Board's Censure, 77–8, 90, 94, 96–7, 110–11, 115, 122, 147–9, 151–2, 418, 431, 435–6;
Authorship, 143.
Support for Newman, 62, 63, 68, 69, 91, 93, 98, 101–2, 105–6, 110–11, 121, 152, 157, 161, 167, 169–70, 175, 177, 180, 189, 191–2, 197, 199, 272–3;
Unqualified Support, 95–6, 119, 146–7, 168, 175, 198;
Qualified Support, 70–1, 89, 97–8, 99, 103, 112–13, 117, 168, 198, 202;
Suggested Declaration, 89–90, 96–7, 98–9, 114–15, 122, 147–9.
General Attacks, 116, 124, 156, 192, 200, 202, 233–5, 384;
Liberal Attacks, 113–14, 116.
High Church Attitude, 185;
High Church Qualified Support, 89 ('regret'), 114–15, 119–20;
High Church Attacks (see also sub-entries under 'Oxford Movement'), 99–100, 379;
Gladstone's Attitude, 144, 175, 179.
Letter to Jelf, 66, 72–3, 75–6, 78–90, 92, 96, 99–100, 102, 110, 115, 117, 119–20, 123, 129, 136–8, 145, 164, 175, 190, 453;
Support for Letter to Jelf, 96, 101–2, 106, 117, 120, 154.
Bishop of Oxford's Advice, 93–5, 97, 100–1, 103–4, 110, 114–15, 118–19, 145, 157, 204;
Archbishop of Canterbury's stance, 100, 115, 127–8, 156, 191;
Pusey's Visits to Cuddesdon, 113, 123;
Suggestion of 'Suppression', 118–19, 125, 165;
'Understanding', 123–4, 125–8, 145–6, 151;
Newman's Satisfaction at Outcome, 154, 163, 165, 169, 182.
Attitude of Bishops (see also under 'Bishops' Charges'), 106–7, 110–11, 116, 119–21, 150, 156, 169, 185, 189–90, 192, 201;
Bishop of London's stance, 106–7, 119–20, 122, 156.
Letter to the Bishop of Oxford, 125, 127, 129–49, 151, 165, 190;
Support for Letter, 161, 170, 171.
Keble's Letter to Coleridge, 149, 155, 163, 167, 171, 191, 198–9, 201, 206, 378, 432, 466;
Pusey's Letter to Jelf, 197–8, 241;
W. G. Ward's Tutorship, 200–2, 204.
Purgatory, 71, 74, 75, 79, 82, 87, 91, 139;
Images, 71, 82, 87, 139;
Lord's Supper, 71, 74;
Transub-pg 631stantiation, 74, 83, 84, 383;
Invocation of Saints, 75–6, 79, 80, 81, 87, 137, 139, 148;
Pardons, 79, 82;
Merit, 81;
Blessed Virgin Mary, 81, 83, 139;
Relics, 82;
Pope, 83;
Infallibility, 83, 139;
Baptism, 84, 87;
Mass, 84, 87–8;
Justifying Grace, 84, Atonement, 88, Tridentine Catechism and Decrees (see also under 'Tract 90' passim), 91, 244;
Denial of Cup, 139;
Comparison of Tract with Hampden's Lectures, 74, 101.
Giving up Brit. Crit., 6, 57, 61, 113, 150–1, 184;
Article on Faussett, 217–19, 222, 253.
Giving up St Mary's, 9, 116–17, 118–19, 143, 359–60, 430, 463, 469, 498;
Parochial Matters and Visiting, 7, 28, 54, 63, 64, 77, 175, 191, 193, 196, 219, 445;
Catechetical, 93, 155, 158, 161, 171, 175, 207, 210, 223, 227, 251;
Pastoral, 196, 201;
Charity (see also under 'Church Building'), 21, 250.
Practices at St Mary's, 141, 256;
Early Communion, 20, 141;
Rubrics, 156, 406;
Litany, 47;
Morning Service, 47;
Experiences of Sacrament, 367.
Nature of Sermons and Preaching, 7, 140–1, 351, 428–9, 441;
Accounts of Preaching, 199;
'Samaritan' Sermons, 361, 363, 366, 373–5, 378.
Spiritual Direction (see also under 'Movement to Rome'), 159, 166, 193, 223–4, 238–9, 247–8, 366–7, 375, 416–17, 421–2, 427–8, 473, 482.
Absolution, 212, Breviary, 20, 133, 139, 190–1, 212, 233–4, 367–8;
Breviary Translation Project, 44, 220–1, 228, 271–2;
Fasting, 179, 460–1, 468–9.
Church Architecture (see also under 'Architectural Society' and 'Littlemore'), 235–6;
Church Music, 43;
Monasteries, 361;
Margaret Street Community, 367–8, 416–17;
Prayers for Unity, 46–7, 251, 271–2, 310;
Female Religious Houses, 292;
Lady Novelists, 19–20, 34–5, 40, 44, 46, 56, 145, 162, 296, 356, 393, 422, 437, 471, 492.
Bishop's Charges, 286–7, 299–300, 305–6, 310–11, 320–2, 325, 335, 360, 383, 387–97, 405, 408, 430, 435, 451, 457, 491, 569–92 passim; Bishop of Chester's Charge, 305–8, 322, 360, 388, 391–4, 569–75;
Bishop of London's Policy (see also under 'Tract 90'), 417, 467–8, 486–7, 514;
Obstruction of Orders, 205, 381, 384, 514.
Keble and Peter Young's Ordination, 224–8, 231–3, 236, 258–9, 260, 273–4, 286–8, 352, 377, 389–90, 393–4, 406, 418, 451, 453, 475;
Question of Convocation, 389–91, 411–12;
Keble's Protest to the Archbishop, 389–91, 411–12, 415, 449–50, 465–6, 499, 500, 514, 593–5.