Amelia Alderson Opie

Shelley King and John B. Pierce (eds), The Collected Poems of Amelia Alderson Opie

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Editor’s Note209LINES FROM A GENTLEMAN IN INDIA TO HIS WIFE IN ENGLAND

  • 1Forget thee, no! though years roll on,
  • 2 Thou every year must dearer be;
  • 3For oh! when all save thee was gone,
  • 4 Thou stood'st between despair and me.
  • 5Now Fortune's favours round me flow,
  • 6 Her smiles my worldly cares dispelling,
  • 7Yet dearer were my hours of woe,
  • 8 For they were passed with thee, my Helen.
  • 9Then though, through many an anxious day,
  • 10 'Twas mine to toil with weary feet;
  • 11One precious thought still cheared my way,
  • 12 I knew that we at night should meet.
  • 13I knew my fortune's fatal fall
  • 14 And friends, with cruel frowns repelling,
  • 15Would be at home forgotten all,
  • 16 For there would smile my faithful Helen.
  • 17But now, while I in gilded dome
  • 18 Or bower of breathing sweets recline,
  • 19Or fill with glittering crowds my home,
  • 20 And call each eastern luxury mine;
  • pg 25621Sad sudden tears obscure my eye,
  • 22 And shroud in gloom my dazzling dwelling,
  • 23As gazing round I fondly sigh,
  • 24 'Fair forms are here, but not my Helen.'
  • 25And dost thou suffer weep and pine,
  • 26 Because divided is our fate?
  • 27Then I'll ambition's joys resign,
  • 28 And all unshared by Helen hate.
  • 29I come! I come! the ship is here,
  • 30 To bear me to a dearer dwelling!
  • 31The sail's unfurled! I go to share
  • 32 Each future hour with love and helen.

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Notes

Editor’s Note
209. Copy text: EM 81 (1822):304
Editor’s Note
209. Print version: EM 81 (Apr. 1822): 304.
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