Elizabeth Stuart, Queen of Bohemia

Nadine Akkerman (ed.), The Correspondence of Elizabeth Stuart, Queen of Bohemia, Vol. 1: 1603–1631

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539. ELIZABETH in The Hague to ROE [in Danzig?1]          15 March 1630

Holograph, TNA, SP 88/7, fos. 225–6. No address. Roe's endorsement, fo. 226v: 'From the Queen of Bohemia 5. march 1629'. Printed sources: Letters Relating to the Mission of Sir Thomas Roe, ed. Gardiner, no. 25, and Baker 77–8 (misdated as 15 Mar. 1629). For Roe's reply, see Letter 541 (30 Apr. 1630).

pg 799Honest Thom, your letter was verie welcome to me, for I ame glade you are well in Barbarie, though I wish you in the same kinde heere,2 the king will tell you himself howso>m<uch he esteemes both you and your aduertisements, which are indeed verie good, and if the king of Su>w<eden gett the Emperour to restore the Dukes of Meckebourg,3 I know what both we and you I belleeue shall think,4 Sr Henry Vane is still heere5 and not like to stirr so soone he carieth himself verie well, and is as little confident of the treaties with Spaine as we are,6 though by Dudlie Carleton who is euerie day expected heere out of England, we shall heere great matters from,7 thence when he comes I will lett you know what it s>i<s, the speech heere of truce is not so much as it was, all things in England are the same, without anie great change the Queene my Sister lookes to be brought [fo. 225v] to bed in June,8 and my brother is at Neumarquet,9 the king heere hath bene euill first of a sore throat, and since of a weakness which took away his stomack10 but after that an impostume11 or two brocke out vppon his bodie he is well againe, and I hope will be abroad at Easter, he was neuer so euill as he kept his bed with, the Phisitians say12 that his desease is come from the misfortune he had last yeare in the water,13 indeed he was neuer well since, but I hope all is past, I write this to you, because I know you will heare manie rumours of his sickness, that may make you afrayed, and I ame sure you will be glade to heere he is so well, for I know and ame sure of your loue to vs, I hope at your returne you will come this way which I shall be verie glade of, I dare speake more to you then write, and for your letters lett me euer know what I shall doe with them, to shew them to this Ambassadour [fo. 226r] or not,14 and you may be confident I will, for I assure you that nothing shall euer make me other then

  • Your constant frend
  • Elizabeth

the Hagh this 5/15 of Marche

I pray send me word if you haue he receaued the letter I writt to you by Macquay,15 I shall wish you heere one16 monday for to see a comedie the scornfull ladie acted by your Cosen Honywood and some other of our countriemen to passe the time a little to the kingpg 800

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Notes

Editor’s Note
1 Roe had returned from Warsaw to Danzig on 17 Dec. 1629, where he would remain until 26 Apr. 1630 (Strachan 206–8).
Editor’s Note
2 Cf. the conclusion of Elizabeth's previous letter to Roe, Letter 534.
Editor’s Note
3 In 1627, the Emperor had driven Adolph Friedrich I, Duke of Mecklenburg-Schwerin, and his younger brother Johann Albrecht II, Duke of Mecklenburg-Güstrow, out of their dominions, in order to liquidate a debt to Wallenstein. By investing Wallenstein with the title Duke of Mecklenburg, the Emperor had in effect made his commander a prince of the Holy Roman Empire (Parker 109).
Editor’s Note
4 That is, if Gustavus Adolphus were able to restore the Dukes of Mecklenburg to their dominions, then the Swedish king could accomplish the same for Elizabeth and Frederick. The dukes' restitution by Gustavus Adolphus's assistance in 1631 would indeed inspire such hopes. However, the Swedish king's benevolence came at a price: he had demanded possession of Wismar, a key port, for the duration of the war: see also Vol. II.
Editor’s Note
5 Vane arrived in the Low Countries in Nov. 1629: see Letter 533 n. 3.
Editor’s Note
7 Carleton, the younger, did not return to The Hague until Aug. 1630, bringing further confirmation of Charles I concluding a truce with Spain: see Letter 550.
Editor’s Note
8 Henrietta Maria gave birth to Prince Charles, the future Charles II, on 29 May 1630 in St James's Palace.
Editor’s Note
9 Newmarket.
Editor’s Note
10 stomach: in the archaic sense, meaning 'appetite or relish for food' (OED n. 5a).
Editor’s Note
11 impostume: 'purulent swelling or cyst in any part of the body; an abscess' (OED n. 1).
Editor’s Note
12 Rumpf and Mayerne: see Mayerne's letter to Elizabeth of 5 Jan. 1630, Letter 537.
Editor’s Note
13 On 17 Jan. 1629 Frederick had searched the cold waters in vain for hours to rescue his first-born son: see Letter 490 n. 2.
Editor’s Note
14 Elizabeth had shared her mail with Dorchester. She needed to know whether Roe would allow her to continue this trust with the ambassador's namesake, nephew, and successor, Carleton, the younger.
Editor’s Note
15 Possibly William Mackay who transferred to Swedish military service around this time (SSNE 471; see also SSNE 472).
Editor’s Note
16 That is, 'on'. Elizabeth wrote her letter on Friday, thus the date of the performance of Francis Beaumont and John Fletcher's The Scornful Lady (printed 1616) was 8/18 Mar. 1630. The play refers to the Cleves crisis.
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