Jeremy Bentham

Michael Quinn (ed.), The Collected Works of Jeremy Bentham: Writings on the Poor Laws, Vol. 2

Contents
Find Location in text

Main Text

pg 644§3. Appropriate Comforts; extended by special Care to Classes ordinarily bereft of them.

I. Feeble hands, incapable of self-conveyance.

comforts.

efficient causes.

1. Faculty of partaking of the benefits of divine service.

1. Centrality of the chapel part—thence the paupers, in the several divisions all round, within sight and hearing of the minister without quitting their seats. B. ii. c. 3.1a

2. Opportunities of air and exercise.

2. Faculty of being stationed for the purpose of superintendence in the moveable watch-houses, adding at night to the number of peculium abodes. B. ii. c. 3.2—Opportunities of being sent on errands to the circumjacent parishes, or industry-houses, by means of the system of cheap-conveyance. B. iii. c. 7.3—Means of air and exercise, even in rainy weather, in the corridor. B. ii. c. 3.4

3. Opportunities of constant occupation, suited to their remaining faculties.

3. Largeness of the scale of management, thence faculty of finding suitable employment for every remnant of ability, however circumstanced. B. ii. c. 4. B. vi. c. 1.5

pg 645II. Infirm and sick persons labouring under cases of peculiar difficulty.

comforts.

efficient causes.

4. Superior chance of medical relief.

4. Publicity of the management in a medical as well as all other points of view—hence the attention and beneficence for which the medical faculty are so peculiarly conspicuous, attracted to all such cases. B. iii. c. 12.1a

III. and IV. Persons deaf and dumb.—Persons born blind, or stricken with blindness while unmarried.

comforts.

efficient causes.

5. Facility in regard to obtaining the comforts of matrimony.

5. Advantages of being educated or associated with persons of the opposite sex, partakers of the same infirmity. B. ii. c. 11.2—A value, scarce yielding to that of ordinary labour, being moreover given to the labour of persons thus circumstanced, the difficulties which stand in the way of matrimonial union among persons thus circumstanced, especially in the case of the poor, whether charity-fed, or of self-maintaining families, are thus removed.

Notes

a To those who, regarding the salvation of souls as an object, regard the habit of devotion as a means, this single advantage, unenjoyed under the existing community-provision system, uncommunicable to the [home-provision]6 system, or to the self-maintaining poor, not to mention the rich, should seem enough to command their approbation and assistance.

A regulation one meets with in poor-houses having chapels within themselves is, that all that are well enough to quit their rooms shall pay attendance on divine service:7—the benefit being thus sought to be imparted to all—except those whose case stands most in need of it, and among whom are likely to be found those who are most desirous of it.

a Cases of peculiar difficulty are apt to be cases of peculiar affliction. To obtain a consultation of three or four physicians, is regarded as no small effort among the most opulent. Among our poor, cases of this description will naturally enjoy the benefit of a sort of general consultation, calling forth the united powers of the whole faculty.

Notes Settings

Notes

Editor’s Note
1 See p. 503 above.
Editor’s Note
2 See pp. 507–9 above.
Editor’s Note
3 See p. 607 above.
Editor’s Note
4 See p. 509 above.
Editor’s Note
5 See pp. 518–20 above, 678–80 below, respectively.
Editor’s Note
1 See pp. 624–5 above.
Editor’s Note
2 See pp. 162, 549–50 above.
Editor’s Note
6 Annals 'house-provision'.
Editor’s Note
7 This was the case in the Shrewsbury House of Industry: see Wood, Some Account of the Shrewsbury House of Industry, 2nd edn., p. 88.
logo-footer Copyright © 2019. All rights reserved. Access is brought to you by Log out