Gary Taylor, John Lavagnino, MacDonald P. Jackson, John Jowett, Valerie Wayne, and Adrian Weiss (eds), Thomas Middleton, Vol. 1: The Collected Works

Contents
Find Location in text

Main Text

1.2

Editor’s NoteCritical Apparatus Enter Lord Anselmus, the deposed King's brother, with his friend Votarius
Editor’s Note1

votarius Pray, sir, confine your thoughts and excuse me.

2Methinks the deposed king your brother's sorrow

3Should find you business enough.

anselmus How, Votarius?

4Sorrow for him? Weak ignorance talks not like thee.

5Why, he was never happier!

votarius Pray prove that, sir.

Editor’s Note6

anselmus He's lost the kingdom, but his mind's restored;

7Which is the larger empire? Prithee tell me.

Editor’s Note8Dominions have their limits: the whole earth

9Is but a prisoner, nor the sea her jailer,

10That with a silver hoop locks in her body.

11They're fellow prisoners, though the sea look bigger

12Because he is in office, and pride swells him.

13But the unbounded kingdom of the mind

Critical Apparatus14Is as unlimitable as heaven,

15That glorious court of spirits, all honest courtiers!

16Sir, if thou lov'st me, turn thine eye to me

17And look not after him that needs thee not.

18My brother's well attended. Peace and pleasure

19Are never from his sight: he has his mistress.

Editor’s Note20She brought those servants and bestowed them on him,

21But who brings mine?

votarius Had you not both long since

22By a kind, worthy lady, your chaste wife?

23

anselmus That's it that I take pains with thee to be sure of.

24What true report can I send to my soul

25Of that I know not? We must only think

26Our ladies are good people, and so live with 'em,

Editor’s Note27A fine security for them! Our own thoughts

Editor’s Note28Make the best fools of us; next to them, our wives.

29But say she's all chaste, yet is that her goodness?

30What labour is't for woman to keep constant

31That's never tried or tempted? Where's her fight,

32The wars within her breast, her honest anger

33Against the impudence of flesh and hell?

Editor’s NoteCritical Apparatus34So let me know the lady of my rest,

35Or I shall never sleep well. Give not me

pg 847

Editor’s Note36The thing that is thought good, but what's approved so,

37So wise men choose. O what a lazy virtue

38Is chastity in a woman if no sin

39Should lay temptation to't! Prithee set to her

40And bring my peace along with thee.

votarius You put to me

41A business that will do my words more shame

42Than ever they got honour among women.

43Lascivious courtings among sinful mistresses

Editor’s Note44Come ever seasonably, please best;

45But let the boldest ruffian touch the ear

46Of modest ladies with adulterous sounds,

47Their very looks confound him and force grace

Critical Apparatus48Into that cheek where impudence sets her seal.

49That work is never undertook with courage

Editor’s Note50That makes his master blush. However, sir,

51What profit can return to you by knowing

52That which you do already, with more toil?

53Must a man needs, in having a rich diamond,

54Put it between a hammer and an anvil

55And, not believing the true worth and value,

56Break it in pieces to find out the goodness,

57And, in the finding, lose it? Good sir, think on't.

Editor’s Note58Nor does it taste of wit to try their strengths

Editor’s Note59That are created sickly, nor of manhood.

Editor’s Note60We ought not to put blocks in women's ways

Critical Apparatus61For some too often fall upon plain ground.

62Let me dissuade you, sir.

anselmus Have I a friend?

Editor’s Note63And has my love so little interest in him

64That I must trust some stranger with my heart

65And go to seek him out?

votarius Nay, hark you, sir,

Editor’s Note66I am so jealous of your weaknesses

67That, rather than you should lie prostituted

68Before a stranger's triumph, I would venture

69A whole hour's shaming for you.

anselmus Be worth thy word, then.

Critical Apparatus Enter Wife

70Yonder she comes. [Aside] I'll have an ear to you both.

71I love to have such things at the first hand!

[He conceals himself]
Editor’s Note72

votarius [aside] I'll put him off with somewhat. Guile in this

Editor’s Note73Falls in with honest dealing. O who could move

74Adultery to yon face? So rude a sin

75May not come near the meekness of her eye.

Editor’s Note76My client's cause looks so dishonestly

pg 848

77I'll ne'er be seen to plead in't.

wife What, Votarius?

78

votarius Good morrow, virtuous madam.

wife Was my lord

79Seen lately here?

votarius He's newly walked forth, lady.

80

wife How was he attended?

votarius Faith, I think with none, madam.

81

wife That sorrow for the king his brother's fortune

82Prevails too much with him, and leads him strangely

83From company and delight.

votarius [aside] How she's beguiled in him!

84There's no such natural touch, search all his bosom.

[To Wife]

85That grief's too bold with him indeed, sweet madam,

86And draws him from the pleasure of his time,

87But 'tis a business of affection

88That must be done. We owe a pity, madam,

89To all men's misery, but especially

Editor’s Note90To those afflictions that claim kindred of us.

Critical Apparatus91We're forced to feel 'em. All compassion else

92Is but a work of charity; this, of nature,

93And ties our pity in a bond of blood.

94

wife Yet, sir, there is a date set to all sorrows.

95Nothing is everlasting in this world.

96Your counsel will prevail. Persuade him, good sir,

97To fall into life's happiness again

98And leave the desolate path. I want his company.

99He walks at midnight in thick shady woods

Editor’s Note100Where scarce the moon is starlight. I have watched him

101In silver nights, when all the earth was dressed

102Up like a virgin in white innocent beams,

103Stood in my window, cold and thinly clad,

104T'observe him through the bounty of the moon

105That liberally bestowed her graces on me;

106And when the morning dew began to fall,

Editor’s Note107Then was my time to weep. He's lost his kindness,

108Forgot the way of wedlock, and become

109A stranger to the joys and rites of love.

110He's not so good as a lord ought to be.

Critical Apparatus111Pray, tell him so from me, sir.

votarius That will I, madam.

Exit Wife

Editor’s Note112Now must I dress a strange dish for his humour.

113

anselmus [aside] Call you this courting? Life, not one word near it!

114There was no syllable but was twelve score off!

pg 849

Editor’s Note115My faith, hot temptation! Woman's chastity

116In such a conflict had great need of one

117To keep the bridge—'twas dangerous for the time.

Editor’s Note118Why, what fantastic faiths are in these days

119Made without substance! Whom should a man trust

Critical Apparatus120In matters about love?

[Anselmus comes forward]

votarius [aside] Mass, here he comes, too!

121

anselmus How now, Votarius? What's the news for us?

122

votarius You set me to a task, sir, that will find

Editor’s Note123Ten ages work enough, and then unfinished.

Editor’s Note124Bring sin before her? Why, it stands more quaking

Editor’s Note125Than if a judge should frown on't! Three such fits

Editor’s Note126Would shake it into goodness, and quite beggar

127The under-kingdom! Not the art of man

128Woman, or devil—

anselmus [interrupting] O, peace, man! Prithee, peace.

129

votarius —Can make her fit for lust.

anselmus Yet again, sir?

Editor’s Note130Where lives that mistress of thine, Votarius,

131That taught thee to dissemble? I'd fain learn.

132She makes good scholars.

votarius How, my lord?

133

anselmus Thou art the son of falsehood. Prithee, leave me.

134How truly constant, charitable and helpful

135Is woman unto woman in affairs

136That touch affection and the peace of spirit,

137But man to man, how crooked and unkind!

Editor’s Note138I thank my jealousy I heard thee all,

139For I heard nothing.—Now thou'rt sure I did.

Editor’s Note140

votarius Now, by this light, then wipe but off this score,

Editor’s Note141Since you're so bent, and if I ever run

142In debt again to falsehood and dissemblance

143For want of better means, tear the remembrance of me

144From your best thoughts.

anselmus For thy vow's sake, I pardon thee.

145Thy oath is now sufficient watch itself

146Over thy actions. I discharge my jealousy.

Editor’s Note147I ha' no more use for't now! To give thee way,

148I'll have an absence made purposely for thee,

Editor’s Note149And presently take horse. I'll leave behind me

Editor’s Note150An opportunity that shall fear no starting.

pg 850

Editor’s Note151Let but thy pains deserve it.

votarius I am bound to't.

152

anselmus For a small time, farewell, then. Hark thee—

votarius [interrupting] O, good sir,

153It will do wondrous well.

Critical Apparatus Exit Anselmus

What a wild seed

Editor’s Note154Suspicion sows in him, and takes small ground for't.

Editor’s Note155How happy were this lord, if he would leave

156To tempt his fate and be resolved he were so.

Editor’s NoteCritical Apparatus157He would be but too rich.

158Man has some enemy still that keeps him back

Editor’s Note159In all his fortunes, and his mind is his,

160And that's a mighty adversary. I had rather

Critical Apparatus161Have twenty kings my enemies than that part,

Editor’s Note162For let me be at war with earth and hell,

163So that be friends with me.—I ha' sworn to make

164A trial of her faith. I must put on

165A courtier's face and do't. Mine own will shame me.

Critical Apparatus Enter Wife
166

wife This is most strange of all! How one distraction

Editor’s Note167Seconds another!

votarius What's the news, sweet madam?

Editor’s Note168

wife He's took his horse, but left his leave untaken.

169What should I think on't, sir? Did ever lord

170Depart so rudely from his lady's presence?

171

votarius Did he forget your lip?

wife He forgot all

172That nobleness remembers.

votarius I'm ashamed on him.

173Let me help, madam, to repair his manners,

174And mend that unkind fault.

[He tries to kiss her]

wife Sir, pray forbear.

175You forget worse than he.

votarius [aside] So virtue save me,

176I have enough already.

wife 'Tis himself

177Must make amends, good sir, for his own faults.

178

votarius [aside] I would he'd do't, then, and ne'er trouble me in't.

[To Wife]

179But, madam, you perceive he takes the course

180To be far off from that: he's rode from home,

181But his unkindness stays, and keeps with you.

Editor’s Note182Let whos' will please his wife, he rides his horse;

183That's all the care he takes. I pity you, madam:

184You've an unpleasing lord. Would 'twere not so,

185I should rejoice with you.

pg 851

186You're young, the very spring's upon you now,

Editor’s Note187The roses on your cheeks are but new blown—

188Take you together, you're a pleasant garden

189Where all the sweetness of man's comfort breathes.

190But what is it to be a work of beauty

191And want the heart that should delight in you?

192You still retain your goodness in yourselves,

Editor’s Note193But then you lose your glory, which is all.

Editor’s Note194The grace of every benefit is the use,

195And is't not pity you should want your grace?

196Look you like one whose lord should walk in groves

197About the peace of midnight? Alas, madam,

198'Tis to me wondrous how you should spare the day

Editor’s Note199From amorous clips, much less the general season

Editor’s Note200When all the world's a gamester.

Editor’s Note201That face deserves a friend of heart and spirit,

202Discourse and motion, indeed such a one

203That should observe you, madam, without ceasing,

204And not a weary lord.

wife Sure, I was married, sir,

Editor’s Note205In a dear year of love, when scarcity

206And famine of affection vexed poor ladies,

207Which makes my heart so needy. It ne'er knew

208Plenty of comfort yet.

votarius Why, that's your folly,

Editor’s Note209To keep your mind so miserably, madam.

210Change into better times. I'll lead you to 'em.

211What bounty shall your friend expect for his?

Critical Apparatus212O, you that can be hard to your own heart,

Critical Apparatus213How would you use your friend's? If I thought kindly,

214I'd be the man myself should serve your pleasure.

215

wife How, sir?

216

votarius Nay, and ne'er miss you, too: I'd not come sneaking

Editor’s Note217Like a retainer, once a week or so,

218To show myself before you for my livery.

219I'd follow business like a household servant,

220Carry my work before me and dispatch

221Before my lord be up, and make no words on't,

222The sign of a good servant.

wife 'Tis not friendly done, sir,

223To take a lady at advantage thus,

224Set all her wrongs before her, and then tempt her.

Editor’s Note225

votarius [aside] Heart, I grow fond myself! 'Twas well she waked me,

pg 852

Editor’s Note226Before the dead sleep of adultery took me—

227'Twas stealing on me. Up, you honest thoughts,

228And keep watch for your master.—[To Wife] I must hence.

[Aside]

Editor’s Note229I do not like my health; 't'as a strange relish.

Editor’s Note230Pray heaven I plucked mine eyes back time enough.

231I'll never see her more. I praised the garden,

232But little thought a bed of snakes lay hid in't.

[He prepares to leave]
233

wife [aside] I know not how I am! I'll call my woman.—

[To Votarius]

234Stay! [Aside] For I fear thou'rt too far gone already.

235

votarius [aside] I'll see her but once more. Do thy worst, love,

Editor’s Note236Thou art too young, fond boy, to master me.

[To Wife]

237I come to tell you, madam, and that plainly,

238I'll see your face no more. Take't how you please!

239

wife You will not offer violence to me, sir,

Editor’s Note240In my lord's absence? What does that touch you

241If I want comfort?

votarius Will you take your answer?

242

wife It is not honest in you to tempt woman

243When her distresses takes away her strength:

244How is she able to withstand her enemy?

Editor’s Note245

votarius I would fain leave your sight, an I could possible.

246

wife What is't to you, good sir, if I be pleased

247To weep myself away, and run thus violently

248Into the arms of death, and kiss destruction.

[She runs to him and kisses him]

249Does this concern you now?

votarius Aye, marry, does it.

[Returning her kiss]

250What serve these arms for but to pluck you back,

251These lips but to prevent all other tasters,

252And keep that cup of nectar for themselves?

[Aside]

253Heart, I'm beguiled again! Forgive me, heaven!

Editor’s Note254My lips have been naught with her! Sin's mere witchcraft!

Editor’s Note255Break all the engines of life's frame in pieces,

Editor’s Note256I will be master once, and whip the boy

Editor’s Note257Home to his mother's lap. [To Wife] Face, fare thee well!

Critical Apparatus Exit [abruptly] pg 853
258

wife Votarius? Sir? My friend? Thanks, heaven, he's gone

259And he shall never come so near again.

Critical Apparatus260I'll have my frailty watched ever. Henceforward

Editor’s Note261I'll no more trust it single, it betrays me

262Into the hands of folly. Where's my woman?

Editor’s NoteCritical Apparatus Enter Leonella

263My trusty Leonella!

leonella Call you, madam?

264

wife Call I? I want attendance! Where are you?

265

leonella Never far from you, madam.

wife Pray be nearer,

Editor’s Note266Or there is some that will, and thank you, too;

267Nay, perhaps bribe you to be absent from me.

268

leonella How, madam?

wife Is that strange to a lady's woman?

269There are such things i'th' world, many such buyers

270And sellers of a woman's name and honour,

Editor’s Note271Though you be young in bribes, and never came

Editor’s Note272To the flesh market yet.—Beshrew your heart,

273For keeping so long from me!

leonella What ail you, madam?

274

wife Somewhat commands me, and takes all the power

275Of myself from me!

leonella What should that be, lady?

276

wife When did you see Votarius?

leonella [aside] Is that next?

Editor’s Note277Nay, then, I have your ladyship in the wind!

[To Wife]

278I saw him lately, madam.

wife Whom did'st see?

279

leonella Votarius.

wife What have I to do with him

280More than another man? Say he be fair,

281And his parts proper both of mind and body,

Critical Apparatus282You praise him but in vain in telling me so.

283

leonella [aside] Yea, madam, are you prattling in your sleep?

Editor’s Note284'Tis well my lord and you lie in two beds!

Editor’s NoteCritical Apparatus285

wife [aside] I was ne'er so ill. [To Leonella] I thank you, Leonella,

286My negligent woman, here you showed your service.

Editor’s Note287

leonella [aside] Life, have I power or means to stop a sluice

Critical Apparatus288At a high water? What would sh'ave me do in't?

pg 854
289

wife I charge thee, while thou liv'st with me, henceforward

Critical Apparatus290Use not an hour's absence from my sight.

Exit
291

leonella By my faith, madam, you shall pardon me,

292I have a love of mine own to look to,

Editor’s Note293And he must have his breakfast. [Calling offstage] Psst! Bellarius!

Critical Apparatus Enter Bellarius, muffled in his cloak
294

bellarius Leonella?

295

leonella Come forth, and show yourself a gentleman,

Editor’s Note296Although most commonly they hide their heads,

Critical Apparatus297As you do there, methinks!

298And why a taffeta muffler? Show your face, man.

299I'm not ashamed on you.

bellarius I fear the servants.

300

leonella And they fear their mistress, and ne'er think on you.

301Their thoughts are upon dinner, and great dishes.

Editor’s Note302If one thing hap, impossible to fail, too,

303(I can see so far in't), you shall walk boldly, sir,

304And openly in view through every room

Editor’s Note305About the house; and, let the proudest meet thee,

Editor’s Note306I charge you give no way to 'em.

bellarius How thou talk'st!

Editor’s Note307

leonella I can avoid the fool, and give you reason for't.

Editor’s Note308

bellarius 'Tis more than I should do, if I asked more on thee:

309I prithee, tell me how?

leonella With ease, i'faith, sir.

310My lady's heart is wondrous busy, sir,

311About the entertainment of a friend, too,

Editor’s Note312And she and I must bear with one another

313Or we shall make but a mad house betwixt us.

314

bellarius I'm bold to throw my cloak off at this news,

[He does so]

315Which I ne'er durst before, and kiss thee freelier!

[He kisses Leonella]

316What is he, sirrah?

leonella Faith, an indifferent fellow

317With good long legs, a near friend of my lord's.

318

bellarius A near friend of my lady's, you would say!

319His name, I prithee?

leonella One Votarius, sir.

pg 855Editor’s Note320

bellarius What sayest thou?

leonella He walks under the same title.

321

bellarius The only enemy that my life can show me!

Editor’s Note322

leonella Your enemy? Let my spleen then alone with him.

Editor’s Note323Stay you your anger, I'll confound him for you.

Editor’s Note324

bellarius As how, I prithee?

leonella I'll prevent his venery.

325He shall ne'er lie with my lady.

bellarius Troth, I thank you!

326Life, that's the way to save him! Art thou mad?

327Whereas the other way, he confounds himself

328And lies more naked to revenge and mischief.

329

leonella Then let him lie with her, and the devil go with him!

330He shall have all my furtherance.

Editor’s Note331

bellarius Why, now you pray heartily, and speak to purpose.

Critical Apparatus Exeunt Finis Actus Primus

Translation

1.2

Enter Lord Anselmus, the deposed King's brother, with his friend Votarius
1

votarius Pray, sir, confine your thoughts and excuse me.

2Methinks the deposed king your brother's sorrow

3Should find you business enough.

anselmus How, Votarius?

4Sorrow for him? Weak ignorance talks not like thee.

5Why, he was never happier!

votarius Pray prove that, sir.

6

anselmus He's lost the kingdom, but his mind's restored;

7Which is the larger empire? Prithee tell me.

Critical Apparatus8Dominions have their limits: the whole earth

9Is but a prisoner, nor the sea her jailer,

10That with a silver hoop locks in her body.

11They're fellow prisoners, though the sea look bigger

12Because he is in office, and pride swells him.

13But the unbounded kingdom of the mind

14Is as unlimitable as heaven,

Critical Apparatus15That glorious court of spirits!

16Sir, if thou lov'st me, turn thine eye to me

17And look not after him that needs thee not.

18My brother's well attended. Peace and pleasure

19Are never from his sight: he has his mistress.

20She brought those servants and bestowed them on him,

21But who brings mine?

votarius Had you not both long since

22By a kind, worthy lady, your chaste wife?

23

anselmus That's it that I take pains with thee to be sure of.

24What true report can I send to my soul

25Of that I know not? We must only think

26Our ladies are good people, and so live with 'em,

27A fine security for them! Our own thoughts

28Make the best fools of us; next to them, our wives.

29But say she's all chaste, yet is that her goodness?

30What labour is't for woman to keep constant

31That's never tried or tempted? Where's her fight,

32The wars within her breast, her honest anger

33Against the impudence of flesh and hell?

34So let me know the lady of my rest,

35Or I shall never sleep well. Give not me

36The thing that is thought good, but what's approved so,

37So wise men choose. O what a lazy virtue

38Is chastity in a woman if no sin

39Should lay temptation to't! Prithee set to her

40And bring my peace along with thee.

votarius You put to me

41A business that will do my words more shame

42Than ever they got honour among women.

43Lascivious courtings among sinful mistresses

44Come ever seasonably, please best;

45But let the boldest ruffian touch the ear

46Of modest ladies with adulterous sounds,

47Their very looks confound him and force grace

48Into that cheek where impudence sets her seal.

49That work is never undertook with courage

50That makes his master blush. However, sir,

51What profit can return to you by knowing

52That which you do already, with more toil?

53Must a man needs, in having a rich diamond,

54Put it between a hammer and an anvil

55And, not believing the true worth and value,

56Break it in pieces to find out the goodness,

57And, in the finding, lose it? Good sir, think on't.

58Nor does it taste of wit to try their strengths

59That are created sickly, nor of manhood.

60We ought not to put blocks in women's ways

61For some too often fall upon plain ground.

62Let me dissuade you, sir.

anselmus Have I a friend?

63And has my love so little interest in him

64That I must trust some stranger with my heart

65And go to seek him out?

votarius Nay, hark you, sir,

66I am so jealous of your weaknesses

67That, rather than you should lie prostituted

68Before a stranger's triumph, I would venture

69A whole hour's shaming for you.

anselmus Be worth thy word, then.

Enter Wife

70Yonder she comes. [Aside] I'll have an ear to you both.

71I love to have such things at the first hand!

[He conceals himself]
72

votarius [aside] I'll put him off with somewhat. Guile in this

73Falls in with honest dealing. O who could move

74Adultery to yon face? So rude a sin

75May not come near the meekness of her eye.

76My client's cause looks so dishonestly

77I'll ne'er be seen to plead in't.

wife What, Votarius?

78

votarius Good morrow, virtuous madam.

wife Was my lord

79Seen lately here?

votarius He's newly walked forth, lady.

80

wife How was he attended?

votarius Faith, I think with none, madam.

81

wife That sorrow for the king his brother's fortune

82Prevails too much with him, and leads him strangely

83From company and delight.

votarius [aside] How she's beguiled in him!

84There's no such natural touch, search all his bosom.

[To Wife]

85That grief's too bold with him indeed, sweet madam,

86And draws him from the pleasure of his time,

87But 'tis a business of affectïon

88That must be done. We owe a pity, madam,

89To all men's misery, but especially

90To those afflictions that claim kindred of us.

91We're forced to feel 'em. All compassion else

92Is but a work of charity; this, of nature,

93And ties our pity in a bond of blood.

94

wife Yet, sir, there is a date set to all sorrows.

95Nothing is everlasting in this world.

96Your counsel will prevail. Persuade him, good sir,

97To fall into life's happiness again

98And leave the desolate path. I want his company.

99He walks at midnight in thick shady woods

100Where scarce the moon is starlight. I have watched him

101In silver nights, when all the earth was dressed

102Up like a virgin in white innocent beams,

103Stood in my window, cold and thinly clad,

104T'observe him through the bounty of the moon

105That liberally bestowed her graces on me;

106And when the morning dew began to fall,

107Then was my time to weep. He's lost his kindness,

108Forgot the way of wedlock, and become

109A stranger to the joys and rites of love.

110He's not so good as a lord ought to be.

111Pray, tell him so from me, sir.

votarius That will I, madam.

Exit Wife

112Now must I dress a strange dish for his humour.

113

anselmus [aside] Call you this courting? Life, not one word near it!

114There was no syllable but was twelve score off!

115My faith, hot temptation! Woman's chastity

116In such a conflict had great need of one

117To keep the bridge—'twas dangerous for the time.

118Why, what fantastic faiths are in these days

119Made without substance! Whom should a man trust

120In matters about love?

[Anselmus comes forward]

votarius [aside] Mass, here he comes, too!

121

anselmus How now, Votarius? What's the news for us?

122

votarius You set me to a task, sir, that will find

123Ten ages work enough, and then unfinished.

124Bring sin before her? Why, it stands more quaking

125Than if a judge should frown on't! Three such fits

126Would shake it into goodness, and quite beggar

127The under-kingdom! Not the art of man

128Woman, or devil—

anselmus [interrupting] O, peace, man! Prithee, peace.

129

votarius —Can make her fit for lust.

anselmus Yet again, sir?

130Where lives that mistress of thine, Votarius,

131That taught thee to dissemble? I'd fain learn.

132She makes good scholars.

votarius How, my lord?

133

anselmus Thou art the son of falsehood. Prithee, leave me.

134How truly constant, charitable and helpful

135Is woman unto woman in affairs

136That touch affection and the peace of spirit,

137But man to man, how crooked and unkind!

138I thank my jealousy I heard thee all,

139For I heard nothing. — Now thou'rt sure I did.

140

votarius Now, by this light, then wipe but off this score,

141Since you're so bent, and if I ever run

142In debt again to falsehood and dissemblance

143For want of better means, tear the remembrance of me

144From your best thoughts.

anselmus For thy vow's sake, I pardon thee.

145Thy oath is now sufficient watch itself

146Over thy actions. I discharge my jealousy.

147I ha' no more use for't now! To give thee way,

148I'll have an absence made purposely for thee,

149And presently take horse. I'll leave behind me

150An opportunity that shall fear no starting.

151Let but thy pains deserve it.

votarius I am bound to't.

152

anselmus For a small time, farewell, then. Hark thee—

votarius [interrupting] O, good sir,

153It will do wondrous well.

Exit Anselmus

What a wild seed

154Suspicion sows in him, and takes small ground for't.

155How happy were this lord, if he would leave

156To tempt his fate and be resolved he were so.

157He would be but too rich.

158Man has some enemy still that keeps him back

159In all his fortunes, and his mind is his,

160And that's a mighty adversary. I had rather

161Have twenty kings my enemies than that part,

162For let me be at war with earth and hell,

163So that be friends with me.—I ha' sworn to make

164A trial of her faith. I must put on

Critical Apparatus165A brazen face and do't. Mine own will shame me.

Enter Wife
166

wife This is most strange of all! How one distraction

167Seconds another!

votarius What's the news, sweet madam?

168

wife He's took his horse, but left his leave untaken.

169What should I think on't, sir? Did ever lord

170Depart so rudely from his lady's presence?

171

votarius Did he forget your lip?

wife He forgot all

172That nobleness remembers.

votarius I'm ashamed on him.

173Let me help, madam, to repair his manners,

174And mend that unkind fault.

[He tries to kiss her]

wife Sir, pray forbear.

175You forget worse than he.

votarius [aside] So virtue save me,

176I have enough already.

wife 'Tis himself

177Must make amends, good sir, for his own faults.

178

votarius [aside] I would he'd do't, then, and ne'er trouble me in't.

[To Wife]

179But, madam, you perceive he takes the course

180To be far off from that: he's rode from home,

181But his unkindness stays, and keeps with you.

182Let whos' will please his wife, he rides his horse;

183That's all the care he takes. I pity you, madam:

184You've an unpleasing lord. Would 'twere not so,

185I should rejoice with you.

186You're young, the very spring's upon you now,

187The roses on your cheeks are but new blown—

188Take you together, you're a pleasant garden

189Where all the sweetness of man's comfort breathes.

190But what is it to be a work of beauty

191And want the heart that should delight in you?

192You still retain your goodness in yourselves,

193But then you lose your glory, which is all.

194The grace of every benefit is the use,

195And is't not pity you should want your grace?

196Look you like one whose lord should walk in groves

197About the peace of midnight? Alas, madam,

198'Tis to me wondrous how you should spare the day

199From amorous clips, much less the general season

200When all the world's a gamester.

201That face deserves a friend of heart and spirit,

202Discourse and motion, indeed such a one

203That should observe you, madam, without ceasing,

204And not a weary lord.

wife Sure, I was married, sir,

205In a dear year of love, when scarcity

206And famine of affection vexed poor ladies,

207Which makes my heart so needy. It ne'er knew

208Plenty of comfort yet.

votarius Why, that's your folly,

209To keep your mind so miserably, madam.

210Change into better times. I'll lead you to 'em.

211What bounty shall your friend expect for his?

212O, you that can be hard to your own heart,

213How would you use your friend's? If I thought kindly,

214I'd be the man myself should serve your pleasure.

215

wife How, sir?

216

votarius Nay, and ne'er miss you, too: I'd not come sneaking

217Like a retainer, once a week or so,

218To show myself before you for my livery.

219I'd follow business like a household servant,

220Carry my work before me and dispatch

221Before my lord be up, and make no words on't,

222The sign of a good servant.

wife 'Tis not friendly done, sir,

223To take a lady at advantage thus,

224Set all her wrongs before her, and then tempt her.

Critical Apparatus225

votarius [aside] I grow fond myself! 'Twas well she waked me,

226Before the dead sleep of adultery took me—

227'Twas stealing on me. Up, you honest thoughts,

228And keep watch for your master.—[To Wife] I must hence.

[Aside]

229I do not like my health; 't'as a strange relish.

230Pray heaven I plucked mine eyes back time enough.

231I'll never see her more. I praised the garden,

232But little thought a bed of snakes lay hid in't.

[He prepares to leave]
233

wife [aside] I know not how I am! I'll call my woman.—

[To Votarius]

234Stay! [Aside] For I fear thou'rt too far gone already.

235

votarius [aside] I'll see her but once more. Do thy worst, love,

236Thou art too young, fond boy, to master me.

[To Wife]

237I come to tell you, madam, and that plainly,

238I'll see your face no more. Take't how you please!

239

wife You will not offer violence to me, sir,

240In my lord's absence? What does that touch you

241If I want comfort?

votarius Will you take your answer?

242

wife It is not honest in you to tempt woman

243When her distresses takes away her strength:

244How is she able to withstand her enemy?

245

votarius I would fain leave your sight, an I could possible.

246

wife What is't to you, good sir, if I be pleased

247To weep myself away, and run thus violently

248Into the arms of death, and kiss destruction.

[She runs to him and kisses him]

249Does this concern you now?

votarius Aye, marry, does it.

[Returning her kiss]

250What serve these arms for but to pluck you back,

251These lips but to prevent all other tasters,

252And keep that cup of nectar for themselves?

[Aside]

Critical Apparatus253I'm beguiled again! Forgive me, heaven!

Critical Apparatus254My lips have been naught with her!

255I will be master once, and whip the boy

256Home to his mother's lap. [To Wife] Face, fare thee well!

Exit [abruptly]
257

wife Votarius? Sir? My friend? Thanks, heaven, he's gone

258And he shall never come so near again.

259I'll have my frailty watched ever. Henceforward

260I'll no more trust it single, it betrays me

261Into the hands of folly. Where's my woman?

Enter Leonella

262My trusty Leonella!

leonella Call you, madam?

263

wife Call I? I want attendance! Where are you?

264

leonella Never far from you, madam.

wife Pray be nearer,

265Or there is some that will, and thank you, too;

266Nay, perhaps bribe you to be absent from me.

267

leonella How, madam?

wife Is that strange to a lady's woman?

268There are such things i'th' world, many such buyers

269And sellers of a woman's name and honour,

270Though you be young in bribes, and never came

271To the flesh market yet.—Beshrew your heart,

272For keeping so long from me!

leonella What ail you, madam?

273

wife Somewhat commands me, and takes all the power

274Of myself from me!

leonella What should that be, lady?

275

wife When did you see Votarius?

leonella [aside] Is that next?

276Nay, then, I have your ladyship in the wind!

[To Wife]

277I saw him lately, madam.

wife Whom did'st see?

278

leonella Votarius.

wife What have I to do with him

279More than another man? Say he be fair,

Critical Apparatus280And has parts proper both of mind and body,

281You praise him but in vain in telling me so.

282

leonella [aside] Yea, madam, are you prattling in your sleep?

283'Tis well my lord and you lie in two beds!

284

wife [aside] I was ne'er so ill. [To Leonella] I thank you, Leonella,

285My negligent woman, here you showed your service.

Critical Apparatus286

leonella [aside] Have I power or means to stop a sluice

287At a high water? What would sh'ave me do in't?

288

wife I charge thee, while thou liv'st with me, henceforward

289Use not an hour's absence from my sight.

Exit
290

leonella By my faith, madam, you shall pardon me,

291I have a love of mine own to look to,

292And he must have his breakfast. [Calling offstage] Psst! Bellarius!

Enter Bellarius, muffled in his cloak
293

bellarius Leonella?

294

leonella Come forth, and show yourself a gentleman,

295Although most commonly they hide their heads,

296As you do there, methinks!

297And why a taffeta muffler? Show your face, man.

298I'm not ashamed on you.

bellarius I fear the servants.

299

leonella And they fear their mistress, and ne'er think on you.

300Their thoughts are upon dinner, and great dishes.

301If one thing hap, impossible to fail, too,

302(I can see so far in't), you shall walk boldly, sir,

303And openly in view through every room

304About the house; and, let the proudest meet thee,

305I charge you give no way to 'em.

bellarius How thou talk'st!

306

leonella I can avoid the fool, and give you reason for't.

307

bellarius 'Tis more than I should do, if I asked more on thee:

308I prithee, tell me how?

leonella With ease, i'faith, sir.

309My lady's heart is wondrous busy, sir,

310About the entertainment of a friend, too,

311And she and I must bear with one another

312Or we shall make but a mad house betwixt us.

Critical Apparatus313

bellarius I'm bold to throw my cloak off at this news,

[He does so]

314Which I ne'er durst before, and kiss thee freelier!

[He kisses Leonella]

315What is he, sirrah?

leonella Faith, an indifferent fellow

316With good long legs, a near friend of my lord's.

317

bellarius A near friend of my lady's, you would say!

318His name, I prithee?

leonella One Votarius, sir.

319

bellarius What sayest thou?

leonella He walks under the same title.

320

bellarius The only enemy that my life can show me!

321

leonella Your enemy? Let my spleen then alone with him.

322Stay you your anger, I'll confound him for you.

323

bellarius As how, I prithee?

leonella I'll prevent his venery.

324He shall ne'er lie with my lady.

bellarius Troth, I thank you!

325Life, that's the way to save him! Art thou mad?

326Whereas the other way, he confounds himself

327And lies more naked to revenge and mischief.

328

leonella Then let him lie with her, and the devil go with him!

329He shall have all my furtherance.

330

bellarius Why, now you pray heartily, and speak to purpose.

Exeunt Finis Actus Primus

Notes Settings

Notes

Critical Apparatus
A1.2.0.1 Lord] scribe (L). The title is often thus abbreviated (e.g. at 1.2.132, 1.2.155, etc.).
Critical Apparatus
A1.2.0.1–2 Enter L Anselmus the deposde kinges brother, wth | his Frend Votarius
Editor’s Note
1.2.0.2 Votarius His name means a worshipper or vow-maker, and has been altered from 'Lothario' in Cervantes's story, while that of 'Anselmo' has been retained.
Editor’s Note
1 Pray … me Votarius is replying to Anselmus's proposal, repeated at ll. 39–40.
Editor’s Note
6–7 He's … empire Unlike Govianus (though like the Tyrant), Anselmus cannot rule his own inner empire, his thoughts.
Editor’s Note
8–12 the whole … him The earth is imprisoned (because surrounded) by the sea, but the sea is also a prisoner (because governed by the moon), though the sea looks bigger because its power over the earth makes it swell with pride.
Critical Apparatus
A1.2.14–15 Is … courtiers] lancashire; spirits | scribe
Editor’s Note
20 those servants i.e. peace and pleasure
Editor’s Note
27 security insurance; protection against unwelcome truths
Editor’s Note
28 next … wives after them, our wives (i.e. make fools of us)
Critical Apparatus
A1.2.34 rest] scribe (Rest), R altered from br (correction in dark ink, possibly made by reviser)
Editor’s Note
34 know i.e. the truth about
Editor’s Note
36 approved proved
Editor’s Note
44 seasonably at a welcome moment
Critical Apparatus
A1.2.48 that] scribe, at altered from e
Editor’s Note
50 However in any case
Editor’s Note
58 try test
Editor’s Note
59 created sickly At this period, women were regarded as weaker in all respects (e.g. sexually, spiritually) than men.
Editor’s Note
60 blocks obstacles, as in a race; even so, some women can fall (i.e. succumb to sexual temptation) on a level course.
Critical Apparatus
A1.2.61 upon] scribe (vpon), v altered from o
Editor’s Note
63 interest in claim upon
Editor’s Note
66–8 jealous … triumph so anxious to conceal your weaknesses that, rather than you should sell (or submit) yourself to the power of a stranger
Critical Apparatus
A1.2.69.1 Enter Wyfe. (left, opposite 1.2.70)
Editor’s Note
72 somewhat something, as at l. A274/B273
Editor’s Note
73 Falls in coincides
Editor’s Note
76–7 My … in't Votarius speaks as a lawyer whose case looks so bad that he does not want to be seen arguing for it.
Editor’s Note
90 kindred of us relationship with us (because they belong to our relatives; also, because they are related to our
own)
Critical Apparatus
A1.2.91 to] scribe, interlined
Editor’s Note
100 scarce … starlight where the moon gives scarcely as much light as the stars
Editor’s Note
107 kindness natural feeling, affection (see A1.1.189/B1.1.166)
Critical Apparatus
A1.2.111.1 Exit Wife
Editor’s Note
112 dress prepare (food)
Editor’s Note
115–17 Woman's … time Her chastity was so fiercely besieged that, like Rome, she needed a hero like Horatius (famous for single-handedly defending the Roman bridge against the Etruscans): Anselmus is being sarcastic.
Editor’s Note
118 fantastic faiths unbelievable promises (as in Revenger, 3.1.6–7)
Critical Apparatus
A1.2.120 he] scribe, interlined
Editor’s Note
123 Ten ages i.e. for ten ages
Editor’s Note
124 it i.e. sin
Editor’s Note
125 judge … frown indicating that he will condemn the prisoner
Editor’s Note
126–7 beggar ∣ The under-kingdom depopulate hell
Editor’s Note
130–1 Where … learn Where does the mistress live who taught you how to act a part? I'd like to learn myself.
Editor’s Note
138 I … all Thanks to my suspiciousness, I
heard everything you said.
Editor’s Note
140 wipe … score Don't count what happened this time.
Editor’s Note
141 bent determined
Editor’s Note
147 way opportunity
Editor’s Note
149 presently take horse set out riding at once
Editor’s Note
150 starting sudden interruption
Editor’s Note
151 bound committed
Critical Apparatus
A1.2.153 Exit Ansel:
Editor’s Note
154 ground basis (and metaphorically, earth)
Editor’s Note
155–6 leave ∣ To tempt leave off tempting
Critical Apparatus
1.2.157–8 He … back] baldwyn; 1 line scribe
Editor’s Note
157 but only
Editor’s Note
159 is his i.e. is his enemy
Critical Apparatus
A1.2.161 part] scribe, preceding word port (?) written, then crossed out
Editor’s Note
162–3 For … me for I could be at war with earth and hell so long as my mind was friends with me.
Critical Apparatus
A1.2.165.1 Enter Wife
Editor’s Note
167 Seconds follows
Editor’s Note
168 his … untaken without saying goodbye
Editor’s Note
182 whos' 'whoso(ever)', i.e. 'let whoever wants to, please … ', and also 'let whoever's "will" (i.e. penis) please … '. For riding as having sex, see above, 1.1.40.
Editor’s Note
187 new blown just opened
Editor’s Note
193 all everything
Editor’s Note
194–5 The … grace? The value of every natural gift lies in its use, so isn't it a shame that you lack the proper appreciation?—There are further implications: if Anselmus is not making proper, i.e. sexual, use of his wife, he is not according proper value to her attractions (also, the Wife's frustration will contribute to her surrender and consequent loss of spiritual grace).
Editor’s Note
199 clips embraces
Editor’s Note
200 a gamester at (sexual) play
Editor’s Note
201–3 a friend … you these terms all carry sexual overtones: friend, i.e. lover (as at A2.1.65); spirit, i.e. semen (as in modern 'spunk'); discourse i.e. intercourse; motion i.e. during the sexual act; to observe is to attend on, pay court to.
Editor’s Note
205 dear year year of famine
Editor’s Note
209 your … miserably your own wishes so neglected
Critical Apparatus
A1.2.212 O, you … heart,] scribe, first written between 1.2.209–10, then crossed out
Critical Apparatus
1.2.213 use] scribe (vse), v altered from w (?)
Editor’s Note
217–22 Like … servant This passage plays upon resemblances between the terms of domestic and sexual service: a retainer lived outside the household, only coming in for his 'livery', a payment of food or clothing (in this case, sex). Business and work can both refer to the sexual act; to dispatch is to finish, and 'up' means erect.
Editor’s Note
A225 Heart 'God's heart!' This and 'Life' (i.e. God's life!) are the two most frequently used oaths in the play. Both Buc, the official censor and others at the playhouse deleted a number of examples, in accordance with contemporary laws against blasphemy on the stage.
Editor’s Note
225 fond besotted
Editor’s Note
226 dead heavy, also spiritually blind (used in the Psalms, 13:3 and 76:6)
Editor’s Note
229 my … relish spiritual state; it has a strange taste. Calvinist discourse often described spiritual states in terms of physical health.
Editor’s Note
230 time enough in time
Editor’s Note
236 fond boy i.e. love, personified as Cupid
Editor’s Note
240 touch matter to
Editor’s Note
245 I … possible I'd like to be out of your sight, if I possibly could.
Editor’s Note
254 naught sexually immoral (for having kissed her)
Editor’s Note
A254 mere witchcraft nothing but an evil spell
Editor’s Note
A255 Break … pieces even if it may break all the parts of my body to pieces
Editor’s Note
A256–7/B255–6 the boy … lap i.e. Cupid back to the lap of his mother Venus
Editor’s Note
A257/B256 Face Votarius associates the attractions of the Wife with her face (as also at 1.2.74, 201, 238).
Critical Apparatus
A1.2.257.1 Exit] scribe (Exit Votaris)
Critical Apparatus
A1.2.257.1 Exit Votaris
Critical Apparatus
A1.2.260/B1.2.259 watched] scribe (watcht), first t altered from r or c (?)
Editor’s Note
A261/B260 Single unaccompanied, alone
Critical Apparatus
A1.2.262.1 Enter Leonela.
Editor’s Note
A262.1/B261.1 Leonella i.e. little lioness (named thus in Cervantes's story)
Editor’s Note
A266/B265 there … too There are others who want to be nearer me and would also thank you for the opportunity.
Editor’s Note
A271/B270 young inexperienced
Editor’s Note
A272/B271 Beshrew your heart curse you
Editor’s Note
A277/B276 I … wind I have picked up your scent (as in hunting).
Critical Apparatus
A1.2.282 but in] scribe, n probably altered, perhaps from s
Editor’s Note
A284/B283 in two beds presumably since Anselmus began to distrust his Wife
Critical Apparatus
A1.2.285 ill… I‸ thank] stenger; ~, I, ~ scribe
Editor’s Note
A285/B284 ill in such a bad state (physically or spiritually)
Editor’s Note
A287/B286 sluice a flood-gate (Leonella cannot stop the truth pouring out of the Wife)
Critical Apparatus
A1.2.288 a] scribe, altered, perhaps from beginning of h
Critical Apparatus
A1.2.290 Exit] scribe (—/Exit lady.)
Critical Apparatus
A1.2.290 —/Exit lady.
Editor’s Note
A293/B292 breakfast any meal that ends a period of fast, but here ending his sexual fast
Bellarius His name means aggressive, warlike (he does not appear in Cervantes's story).
Critical Apparatus
A1.2.293.1 Enter Bellarius | Mufled in his | cloke. (left, opposite 1.2.292–4)
Editor’s Note
A296/B295 hide their heads i.e. keep their heads covered, or their hats on; gentlemen might hide their heads for any number of embarrassing reasons, including to avoid arrest for unpaid debts.
Critical Apparatus
A1.2.297–9/B1.2.296–8 servants] this edition; muffler | you | scribe
Editor’s Note
A302/B301 If … fail if a particular thing happens, which it can't fail to do
Editor’s Note
A305–6/B304–5 let … 'em Even if the proudest confront you, I command you not to step aside for them.
Editor’s Note
A306/B305 How … talk'st What a lot of nonsense you talk.
Editor’s Note
A307/B306 I can … for't I'm not a fool, and I can explain what I've just said.
Editor’s Note
A308/B307 'Tis more … thee If I ask you to tell me more, I'll be the fool.
Editor’s Note
A312–13/B311–12 And … us She and I must put up with one another (also, take the weight of our lovers), or else between the two of us we'll turn the house upside down ('mad' has undertones of sexual obsession and lunacy, as in Changeling: e.g. 1.1.146).
Editor’s Note
A320/B319 He … title That's his name
Editor’s Note
A322/B321 spleen anger, spite
Editor’s Note
A323/B322 confound destroy, as at l. A327/B326, where Bellarius points out that easy access to sin will be more destructive than being hindered from it.
Editor’s Note
A324/B323 venery sexual pleasure
Editor’s Note
A331/B330 to purpose to the point
Critical Apparatus
A1.2.331.1 —Exiunt
Critical Apparatus
B1.2.8–9 Dominions … jailer] smudged pencil cross, left margin BUC (?) may indicate a possible cut
Critical Apparatus
B1.2.15 spirits] followed by all honest Courtiers! scribe, deleted by reviser
Critical Apparatus
B 1.2.165 brazen] reviser, interlined; Courtiers scribe
Critical Apparatus
B 1.2.225 I] preceded by heart, scribe, deleted by reviser
Critical Apparatus
B1.2.253 I'm] preceded by heart scribe, deleted by reviser
Critical Apparatus
B1.2.254 her!] A1.2.254–5 in scribe ('sin's … pieces') deleted by reviser
Critical Apparatus
B1.2.280 has] reviser (?); his scribe
Critical Apparatus
B1.2.286 Have] preceded by life scribe, deleted by reviser
Critical Apparatus
B1.2.313 I'm … news,] 'swer' or 'swor', written in faint ink, right margin
logo-footer Copyright © 2019. All rights reserved.
Access is brought to you by Log out