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Editor’s Note30

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Editor’s Note
These reproaches, plaintive rather than angry, addressed to a friend who has broken his word—Catullus' conception of amicitia as a foedus, a contract, which others regard more lightly than himself, appears again and again both in relation to his friends and in relation to Lesbia: cf. 76. 3, 87. 3, 109. 6—are conveyed in terms so general as to give no clue to their occasion. We do not even know who the offender was. He may have been Catullus' fellow countryman P.(?) Alfenus Varus, who rose from humble origins at Cremona to be a distinguished jurist, served as one of the three commissioners who supervised the confiscations of land in his native province in 41 b.c., and was the first Cisalpine to hold the consulship (Porph. ad Hor. Sat. i. 3. 130; Donatus, Vita Verg. 19; Gellius vii. 5. 1; Digest i. 2. 2. 44). If so, the Varus of poems 10 and 22 may be the same person.
  The stiffness of the language, as compared with that of the other personal poems, and the awkward contortion of line 12, may be due in part to the difficulties of an exacting metre, the greater asclepiadean. Sappho and Alcaeus had written in it and it was used for Athenian skolia (e.g. that quoted in Arist. Wasps 1239, Ἀδμήτου λόγον, ὦταῖρε, μαθὼν τοὺς ἀγαθοὺς φίλει‎). We have nothing in it from the Alexandrian epigrammatist Asclepiades from whom it received its name, but we have examples of its Alexandrian use from Callimachus (fr. 400 Pf.) and Theocritus (28 and 30). The basis, which is free in Greek, is always spondaic in Catullus, as it is in Horace's asclepiadeans (Od. i. 11 and 18, iv. 10); but Catullus knows nothing of the restriction which in Horace makes the end of both the first and the second choriamb coincide with the end of a word.
Critical Apparatus
30. 1 alphene V false δ‎: salse V
Editor’s Note
1. immemor : as often, implies not mere forgetfulness but indifference or treachery: cf. 64. 58, 123, 248.
Editor’s Note
unanimis : see on 9. 4. The dative with falsus is not found again till Seneca (Medea 654 'omnibus uerax, sibi falsus uni').
Critical Apparatus
2 nil 1472: nichil V
Critical Apparatus
3 non codex Antenoris Balbi: non me V
Critical Apparatus
Post hunc uersum duos excidisse credidit Ellis
Editor’s Note
3. iam : 'is it come to this, that you do not hesitate …?'
Editor’s Note
4. nec … placent : the reflection is Homeric: Od. xiv. 83.
Editor’s Note
caelicolis : a solemn epic word, as in 64. 386, 68. 138.
Editor’s Note
4 f. nec … quae : both connexions are difficult. Munro was certainly wrong in explaining nec as equivalent to simple non. nec was used as a simple negative in early Latin: that use appears in the Twelve Tables (e.g. cui suus heres nec escit, i.e. non erit) and it survives in a series of compounds (necopinatus, neglego, negotium) and in a few fixed formulae—neque satis factum (twice in Cato), nec recte (common in Plautus), nec bene (Virg. Ecl. 9. 6 nec uertat bene), nec di sinant (Plin. Ep. ii. 2. 3), and the legal phrases res nec mancipi, furtum nec manifestum and nec oboediens (Cic. Leg. iii. 6). (For a full account of these uses see Löfstedt, Syntactica, i2. 338.) But in literary Latin it is confined to these survivals, in all of which nec negatives a single word or phrase. The emendations num (Schwabe) and nunc (Baehrens) are unconvincing. If the text is sound, nec can only be taken as the weak connective which is often found strengthened by enim, uero, or tamen and sometimes appears by itself, usually in elliptical phrases of the type of nec mirum, neque iniuria, neque invitus, but also in independent sentences in which it has the function, so to speak, of a negative autem (see Kroll, Glotta xxi [1932], 103 ff.); but that use seems hardly possible after a question.
Editor’s Note
quae cannot refer to facta impia: there is no evidence that facta impia neglegere could mean 'heedlessly commit unnatural acts'. If it is right, it must be taken to refer generally to the idea conveyed in the preceding line—the displeasure of heaven at impia facta; but in that case there is no obvious explanation of the plural. Hence Guarinus and Auantius suggested quos (referring to caelicolis: 'you pay no heed to the gods'), Munro quom (making me the object of neglegis and punctuating with a comma after malis).
  In view of the double difficulty Ellis may be right in thinking that between 3 and 4 two lines have been lost which contained another nec, corresponding to that in 4, and a plural antecedent for quae.
Critical Apparatus
5 quae] que V: quos B. Guarinus, quod L. Mueller
Critical Apparatus
6 eheu Pall.: o heu V
Critical Apparatus
dic Auantius3, dice Ellis: dico V
Critical Apparatus
cuiue rmg: cuine V
Critical Apparatus
7 me add. B. Guarinus et Auantius
Editor’s Note
7. certe tute iubebas : 'you kept telling me, you know': for certe introducing a reminder which justifies a grievance cf. 64. 149, Virg. Aen. i. 234.
Editor’s Note
animam tradere : 'to surrender my soul': cf. Plaut. Asin. 141 'amans ego animum meum isti dedi'.
Editor’s Note
tuta omnia : for the phrase cf. Virg. Aen. i. 583 'omnia tuta uides', iv. 298 'omnia tuta timens', Prop. ii. 19. 16 'omnia ab externo sint modo tuta uiro', Ov. F. v. 134 'quod (lares) praestant oculis omnia tuta suis'.
Critical Apparatus
8 tuta omnia β‎: omnia O, omnia tuta X
Critical Apparatus
9 idem O, inde G, inde al. idem R
Editor’s Note
9. idem emphasizes the contrast: see on 22. 14.
Editor’s Note
retrahis te, 'you back away'; cf. Hor. Ep. i. 18. 58 'ne te retrahas et inexcusabilis absis'.
Critical Apparatus
10 uento V: corr. δ‎
Editor’s Note
10. uentos … sinis : the cliché in various forms has a long history in Greek: cf. Homer, Od. viii. 408, Eur. Tro. 419, Apoll. i. 1334, Theoc. 22. 168, 29. 35. Catullus uses it again of broken promises in 64. 59, 142, 65. 17: for other examples in Latin cf. Virg. Aen. ix. 312 (of idle prayers) 'aurae / omnia discerpunt et nubibus irrita donant', Lygd. 6. 27 'uenti temeraria uota / aeriae et nubes diripienda ferant', Culex 380, 383.
Critical Apparatus
11 at ζ‎η‎: ut V
Critical Apparatus
meminerunt] meminere, at e codice nescio quo Muretus
Editor’s Note
11. at : for at emphasizing the apodosis of a conditional sentence cf. 64. 158–60, Virg. Aen. i. 543 'si genus humanum et mortalia temnitis arma, / at sperate deos memores fandi atque nefandi'.
Editor’s Note
Fides : the cult of Fides was very old-established in Rome, where Numa was its legendary founder: whatever the original meaning of the cult, Fides was in later times the presiding spirit of good faith, the quality that makes men keep their word. So it is here, as it is in Cicero (Off. iii. 104 'qui ius iurandum uiolat, is Fidem uiolat') and in Virgil (Aen. i. 292) and Horace (Od. i. 35. 21, C.S. 57), for whom Fides presides over the new age of Augustus.
Editor’s Note
12. The order is quae faciet ut te paeniteat facti tui: for the position of faciet see on 44. 9, 66. 18.
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