A. W. N. Pugin

The Collected Letters of A. W. N. Pugin, Vol. 3: 1846–1848

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To LORD DUNRAVEN?1 Ramsgate, Monday, 18 May 1846

Text: MS UL D/3196/J/5/2   Address: none   Postmark: none

pg 66✠ Ramsgate May 18. 1846

My Lord

I herewith beg to forward the working drawings for the

hall ceiling

great staircase.

I have set out all the moulds &c full size and

gallery end of hall.

I think your Lordsip will perfectly understand

fire place.

what is intended.

Doors.

I would advise your Lordsip however to have a model made of the staircase in wood about 1″. to afoot. I am sure it repay the expence by the increased facility the joiners will have in executing the real work after they have done it.2

I have taken copies of the drawings I have sent & am preparing the patterns for pannels carvings &c which I will send as soon as possible—these are indispensable—& your Lordsip will find them of infinite service.

as regards the hinges of the doors in hall I have sent full sized drawings of them & I am certain that your Lordsip will find smith in the neighbourhood fully competent to make them—as they are easy.3 In the hall I purpose that the doors should open on different hands & the drawing represents the inside of one door & the outside of the other. [Sketch: doors opening on different hands]

with this I send your Lordsip an estimate of the all the fittings models &c. that will have to be done in England and I have included the grates stained glass &c. I have also made a calculation respecting the drawings and—I will undertake to make the whole of the detail drawings including—those required for fittings—tiles

locks hinges Carvings &c.
for the Entrance hall—organ &c
for the Dining room
for the Library
for The terrace.

plans sections & Elevations Detail drawings of all Mouldings full size & necessary instructions

The whole for

£158.

0.

0

time & expenses going to adare

20.

0

0

To Lord Dunraven? Ramsgate, Monday, 18 May 1846

£178.

0.

0

To Lord Dunraven? Ramsgate, Monday, 18 May 1846

any future Journeys will be an additional expense.

The cartoons for stained glass are in the other estimate.4

as I am proceeding with the patterns for the hall & must of course incur imediate expense I shall feel obliged by your Lordsip Sending me an order for £50 which I will place to your credit.

  • I remain with great respect
  • your Lordsips devoted Sert
  • ✠A Welby Pugin           

pg 67Estimate of Stained glass, grates, Iron & brass work patterns for carvings &c. for furnishing the hall Dining room Library Terrace &c. at adare

Great Entrance hall | grate

20

0

0

tiles to line the fire place

3

0

0

patterns in wood for carving &c of gallery

5

0

0

patterns for carvings of staircase & pannels round hall

5

0

0

an aminal for one of the newells of staircase

6

0

0

patters for carvings of fire place

3

10

0

5 ennameled sheilds for fire place

5

0

0

stained glass for staircase window

40

0

0

Cartoons for D°

5

Stained glass for all the windows on west side of hall

260

0

0

cartoons for D°

25

0

0

Dining room | grate

25

0

0

tiles for the fire place

10

0

0

patterns for Carving woodwork of screen fire place ceiling pannelling round room

37

0

0

stained glass for the upper lights of great window

60

0

0

stained glass for the upper lights of side windows

40

0

0

Cartoons for D°

15

0

0

Library | grate

10

0

0

patterns for ceiling panels &c.

15

0

0

Locks hinges & handles for Doors. per Door average £6.

tiles for Laying the cloister next to terrace including patterns

53

0

0

pg 68pg 69

Notes Settings

Notes

Editor’s Note
1 Windham Henry Quin (1782–1850), educated at Eton and Magdalen College, Oxford, married Caroline, daughter of Thomas Wyndham of Dunraven Castle, Glamorganshire, in 1810, and changed his surname to Wyndham-Quin; he became second Earl of Dunraven and Mount-Earl in 1824. Henry and Caroline lived at Adare, County Limerick. Approached initially, it seems, by their son, Lord Adare, Pugin was consulted about alterations to the house, and began work in 1846, for the countess's diary, MS UL D/3196/E/2/49, notes that, when she returned home on 7 October 1846 after a visit, the 'house seemed progressing which was a great pleasure to us, & we begin making the hall airtight for the winter' (fol. 59r). Not all Pugin's proposals were carried out by him, however. Exactly what happened is unclear, and he was certainly still retained in April 1848, for under a date of 28 April of that year Myers sends Pugin an estimate, MS UL D/3196/J/5/10, of £506.14s. for 'the Oak screen Joist & flooring for the Dining Room of Lord Dunraven (Without carriage or Cases'. Later still, in a notebook in which Lord Adare records his expenditure on building work, MS UL D/3196/J/11/2, an entry of £8. 6s. to 'Pugin for carved Pann' (fol. 7) is dated May 1851; another notebook, MS UL D/3196/J/11/3, reveals that the panel displays a raven. Nevertheless, by October 1850 the architect P. C. Hardwick is in charge. On 24 October from 60 Russell Square, London, Hardwick writes to the former Lord Adare, now the third earl as his father died on 6 August 1850, informing him that, as he has had no success in finding a carpenter to work at Adare, he is 'now going to write to Pugin about it—he may know a Houses of Parliament man who would be accustomed to that kind of work'; Hardwick's letter is MS UL D/3196/J/6/1. On 23 November 1850 Hardwick writes again to the third earl; good furniture is 'not easy to design'; perhaps he recommends waiting for twelve months for he believes 'Pugin will send a quantity to the /51 Exhibition'; this letter is MS UL D/3196/J/6/2. His letter of 11 June 1851, MS UL D/3196/J/6/14, written from 21 Cavendish Square, London, gives further proof of Hardwick's dependence on Pugin: 'The door between the Library and dining room, which will go also by this post is mainly copied from Pugins design for the screen, as he agreed to use the same arrangement for the woodwork all through that suite of Rooms.' He writes again on the following day, MS UL D/3196/J/6/15, about a fireplace in a bedroom: 'You know the Shelf is a crux, which Pugin generally gets over by omitting altogether—it is however very necessary and I want to try the brackets that I have designed for this.' On 15 December in a year that is probably 1851 but may possibly be 1852, Hardwick informs the third earl that he 'will send a drawing for the door from the Hall into the Dining room—it should of course correspond with those designed for the Dining room &c, the drawings (Pugin's) of which I have'; this letter is MS UL D/3196/J/6/25. Hardwick continues to be employed until at least 1870, but the deposit also contains a letter of 15 September 1853 from Birmingham, MS UL D/3196/J/5/11, about a wardrobe and a looking-glass, which was written to the third earl by Edward Pugin, and extensive evidence that Pugin's regular collaborators were providing details for some years after his death, Myers till 1857, Herbert Minton in 1859, and Hardman till 1862.
Work executed to Pugin's design at Adare includes the staircase, with its newel posts terminating in carved ravens, the hall ceiling, several chimney-pieces, and other interior details. Firedogs are illustrated in GP, p. 197. The design for a heraldic bird 'to be cut of the solid Newell' which is catalogued and illustrated in Wedgwood 1985, pp. 200–1, and there said to be for Horsted Place, may well be for Adare. Pugin is known to have designed an organ case for the house: in a letter written on 21 February from Adare and kept in ML 1849 Lord Adare asks Hardman about 'brass candle holders, for an Organ case which has been erected here, designed by Mr Pugin' when he writes from London in March Lord Adare requests Hardman 'to ask Mr Pugin, if he can give me 10 minutes on his way through Town; I will meet him any where he chooses to appoint.' Pugin's diary records no visit to London in March 1849 until he goes up on 27 March, returning the next day. Adare may be the subject of a drawing, described in Wedgwood 1977, p. 85, of a great hall, which is stated to have 'an organ at 1st floor level'. MWDB enters to Lord Adare at 12 March 1849 '2 Large Brass Branches to revolve with Cusp Ornaments &c for Organ', at a price of £2. 14s., and '2 Brass Branches to hold 7 Lights to fit into above Branches', costing £6. 10s. The following month, at 16 April 1849, Lord Adare is charged eight shillings for '2 Brass Sawpierced Escutcheons with pins'; an invoice survives from George Cadby in Birmingham, a polisher of metal employed by Hardman, dated 27 April in 1849 and charging twopence for work on two 'Small Scutcheons' which Hardman's firm notes are for 'adare'. MWDB records an order of two pairs of candlesticks, a key 'with Leaf Bow', a flower vase, and an alms dish, from Lord Dunraven at 5 July 1850, at a total cost of £4. 13s., but these articles may all have an ecclesiastical destination; the entry to the earl at 15 January 1851 seems more likely to be for the house: '3 Iron Shields painted with Arms polished' and with what looks like 'Crows feet at back', at a price of £1. 17s. 6d. In a letter filed in ML, Dunraven informs Hardman from Adare on 12 February 1851 that the shields 'look very well'. Sets of andirons for Adare are illustrated in Bard, p. 366. The MFT papers include a drawing of a cross for the Earl of Dunraven, and there is reference in the same deposit to William Monsell. The house was sold out of the family in 1982 and became a luxury hotel in 1988.
Philip Charles Hardwick (1820–90), son of an architect, designed St John's Cathedral and another Catholic church in Limerick, as well as many buildings in England, most notably the demolished Euston Station in London, built from 1846 to 1848. Pugin writes the name 'Hardwicke' in his diary at 29 July 1848, and at 4 August 1848 notes 'Went to Lincoln's Inn. Hardwicke at 10'; there was no man of law by that name in the Inn at that time but neither is it recorded that the architect had an office there; the two parts of Pugin's entry may not belong together but refer to two separate engagements; nevertheless it may perhaps be speculated that this was a meeting about the change-over at Adare.
Pugin visited Adare while he was in Ireland in April. According to the diary of the Countess of Dunraven, he was expected to meet Lord Adare there on 1 April 1846. On that day Lady Dunraven and others at home 'were much disappointed at Mr Pugin the Architect not meeting Adare as we had expected. however we all walked to the Abbey & enjoyed having dear Adare very much' (fol. 16r). Matters were different on 28 April when 'We were much surprised after breakfast by the arrival of Mr Pugin who came quite unexpectedly & Adare not being at home we all seemed puzzled—however after a few hours had elapsed we all understood each other much better & found him very clever & agreeable—. . . William Monsell returned to us' (fol. 21v). The following day 'Adare arrived by Mail to our great joy so he & Mr Pugin & Ld Dunraven had great talks and planning about the building—After lunch they all drove over to Tervoe and were busy there till dinner' (fol. 22r). On Thursday 30 April 'Mr Pugin went away early in the Morning'.
The ruins of the medieval Augustinian abbey stand in the park which surrounds the house at Adare. In the town of Adare another abbey, founded by Trinitarians in 1230 but falling into ruin after the monks were persecuted in the sixteenth century, was rebuilt in 1811 as Holy Trinity Abbey church by Richard Quin, who became the first Earl of Dunraven.
William Monsell (1812–94), created Baron Emly in 1874, married in 1836 Anna Maria Charlotte Wyndham-Quin (1814–55), the only daughter of Lord and Lady Dunraven. They lived at Tervoe, situated on the south bank of the river Shannon, about five miles west of Limerick and seven or eight miles north-east of Adare. Educated at Winchester School before he went up to Oriel College, Oxford, in 1831, William Monsell came of an old family in that part of Ireland and was MP for the county of Limerick from 1847 until 1874. Rather than the reading in Wedgwood 1985, the entry in Pugin's diary for 20 May 1848 may be 'Lord Dunraven Lord Adare Mr Monsell came', with a corresponding adjustment to the entry for 22 May.
In April 1845 Adare and Monsell called at Grace Dieu; Pawley comments that 'the visit had profound consequences: both men eventually became Roman Catholics' (p. 156), Monsell being received at Grace Dieu in December 1850. Phillipps gave his opinion that 'Two more delightful or interesting men' (p. 167) he had not yet seen. Whatever other objects the brothers-in-law had in view, they appear to have been making a tour of sites where Pugin's work could be seen. They went on from Leicestershire to Alton and to Oscott, according to Pawley. They called on Hardman too: writing from Grace Dieu on 25 September 1845 Laura Phillipps reminds Hardman of their visit in the preceding May, when she asks him to send prices of chalices, patens, and flagons to Monsell who wants to acquire something 'very handsome' and is willing to pay up to £150.
Lord Dunraven visited Alton Towers, too, in March 1840 and wrote an account of his impressions to his wife.

As to Alton Towers, Lord Shrewsbury's place, [it] is inconceivable. It is difficult to judge which he favours most, young fir-trees or Chinese pagodas. The grounds seem very extensive, and the gardens and pleasure-grounds immense. But I was so horrified with the very outset that I would not go any further. The house may well be called Towers; there are plenty of them, in the very worst style of modern Gothic. But the inside is well worth going a long way to see. There is an immense collection of armour, marbles and pictures, in gallerys lighted from above, and very badly managed, and too low. Another gallery is now building, and may be better. But many of the rooms are delightful, with their pillars, arches, Oriels, stained glass, beautiful flock papers, curious ceilings, and I know not what—all done by Willement, whose taste is admirable. You know Lord Shrewsbury is a Roman Catholic. The chapel is admirable—very large and immensely high, with beautiful windows executed by Willement, and a gorgeous altar. I could hardly get myself away from it, and then to go outside and look about, was sickening.

The MS is UL D/3196/E/3/123; this transcript is taken from the calendar of the Dunraven papers compiled by Anthony Malcomson. The earliest mention of Thomas Willement in Pugin's correspondence occurs in a letter to Lord Shrewsbury of 28 August 1841.
Editor’s Note
2 Another hand inserts 'will' between 'it' and 'repay'.
Editor’s Note
3 Another hand adds an 's' to the word 'smith'.
Editor’s Note
4 The 'other estimate' is part of the same MS as this letter. No stained glass for Adare is entered in SGDB in Pugin's lifetime.
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